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BULLETIN OF 

ARMSTRONG JUNIOR 



COLLEGE 



1946-1947 



A City Supported Junior College of Savannah, Georgia 



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1$S 




Volume XI Number 1 



1946-1947 



Sl'MMKK — FALL — WINTER — SPRING 



BULLETIN OF 

Armstrong Junior College 



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A City Supported Junior College 
of Savannah, ( reorgia 






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20631 



MEMBERSHIP IN 

American Association of Junior Colleges 

Southern Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools 

A--ociation of Georgia Colleges 



Volume XI • Number 1 



ARMSTRONG COLLEGE 

LIBRARY 



"Education is a companion which no misfor- 
tune can depress — no crime destroy — no en- 
emy alienate — no despotism enslave. At home, 
a friend: abroad, an introduction ; in soli- 
tude, a solace: and in society, an ornament.' 










I 1 

IB 
I 1 6 

! I. 



HERSCHEL V. JENKINS HALL 



ARMSTRONG JUNIOR COLLEGE 

ACADEMIC CALENDAR 
L9461947 



Summer Session 

Registration Wednesday, June 12 

Classes Begin Thursday, June 13 

Examinations Tuesday, Jul> 23 

Fall Quarter 

Freshman Counselling and Registration 

Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday September 17-20 

Upperclassman Registration Friday, September 20 

Classes Begin Monday, September 23 

Test Friday, October 18 

Test Wednesday, November 20 

Thanksgiving Holidays Thursday-Saturday, November 28 30 

Examinations Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, December 16, 17. 18 

Homecoming Friday, December 20 

Christmas Holidays December 19-30 

Winter Quarter 

Registration Thursday. January 2 

Classes Begin Friday. January 3 

Test Friday. January 

Test Friday. February 21 

Examinations Monday-Wednesday, March 17-19 

Spring Quarter 

Registration Friday. March 21 

( lasses Begin Monday, March 21 

Open House Wednesday, April 16 

Tesl Friday. April 25 

Examinations Wednesday-Friday, June 4-6 

President's Reception Friday, June 6 

Sophomore- Alumni Luncheon Saturday, June 7 

( rraduation Exercises Monday, June 9 



OF SAVANNAH, GEORGIA 

THE COLLEGE COMMISSION 

Herschel \. .1 1 \ kins Chairman 

William Minnm Vice-Chairman 

Oi.in I". Fi i m ik. Ex Officio Ormond I!. Strong, Ex Officio 

James P. Hoi lihan, Ex Officio Fred Wessels 

Gi nn \ix \\ . E. \i< holson Rev. John S. \\ ilder, D.I).. 

Hon. Peter R. \i gent, Ex officio Ex Officio 

Mrs. Jt u\\ K. Qi ittlebai m Edgar L. Wortsman 

THE FACULTY 

Poreman M. Hawes, A.B., M.S President 

Arthur M. Gignilliat, A.B., M.\ Registrar 

W. Orson Beecher, A.B., M.A Dean of Students 

W. Orson Beecher. A.B. and M.A., Emory University; M.A.. Uni- 
versity of Georgia. 

Instructor in Social Sciences and Director of 
Armstrong Forum. 
Everett L. Bishop, Jr., A.B. and M.S.. Emory University: Ph.D.. State 
University of Iowa. 

Instructor in Biology and Meteorology. 
Helen Woodward Brandriff, A.B.. Maryville College; B.S. in Library 
Science. Peabody College: M.A., Vanderbilt University. 

Librarian. 
Mona Robinson Chivington. Ph.B.. University of Chicago. 

Instructor in English. 
\\ illiam M. Dabney, A.B. and M. \.. I niversity of Virginia. 

Instructor in History and Political Science. 
Eleanor Joyce Doyle. B.S.. Immaculata College; M.A., Catholic Uni- 
versity of America. 

Instructor in Spanish and Latin American History. 
Martha Bozeman Fay. B.S.. Rockford College; M.S. and Ph.D.. Uni- 
versity of Illinois. 

Instructor in Biology 
Mildred Gladys Feagin. B.S.. University of Georgia. 
Instructor in Mathematics and Physics. 



6 A R M SI RONG J L MO K COLL E G E 

Vrthi i; M. Gignilliat, \.l). and M.A., I niversity of Georgia. 

Instructor in English, 

Noma Lee Goodwin, \.l>.. Duke University; Graduate Study. Duke 
I niversity. 

Instructor in English. 

Main E. Jenkins, A.B., I niversity of Georgia; Graduate Study, 1 ni- 
versity of ( Georgia. 

Instructor in English 

Margaret Spencer Li bs, B. Mus.. Converse College; \.I5.. I niversity 

of Georgia; M.A., Columbia University. 

Instructor in French. 

HARRY B. MlLLER, B.S. in Ch.E.. University of North Carolina: Gradu- 
ate Study. University of North Carolina. 
Instructor in Chemistry. 

Marjorie A. Mosley, Associate in Finance and Commerce, Armstrong 

Junior College. 

Secretary. 

Ik\ Lee Nichols, B.S. in General Engineering. Georgia School of 
Technology. 

Instructor in Engineering Drawing 

Jeanne Patterson Olson. B.S.. University of Georgia; M.S.. Uni- 
versity of \\ isconsin. 

Instructor in Home Economics. 

M \ko\ki;t Persee, Associate in Liberal Arts. Armstrong Junior College. 
Assistant Registrar and Treasurer. 

Dorothy Thompson, A.B., Monmouth College: Social Work. Milwau- 
kee School of Social Work, M.A., Northwestern University. Cer- 
tificate of Psychiatric Social Work. Western Reserve University. 
Instructor in Psychology. 

James Holmes Scarborough, B.S.E.E., Emory University; Graduate 

Study. Emory and Harvard Universities. 

Instructor in Physics and Mathematics 

GLADYS Zilch. Special Courses in Typewriting and Shorthand. I ni- 
versity of Michigan and University of Elorida. 

Instructor in Typewriting and Shorthand. 



OF SA\ \ N N \ li . GEORGIA 

1 \ ENING S< HOOL 

\\ . ORSON III ! ( II I K. 

Film Classics 

Miss Ele \mu; |)<^ i i . 

Introductory Spanish, Intermediate Spanish 

Mrs. Ed* \ki> I\. Grey, 

Creative Handicraft 

Robert Heriot, 

Photography 

II \!;m I). Miller, 

Physical Science 

Lawrence \V. Ross, 

Applied Psychology 

Mrs. Ch \ki.ton Thei s, 

Furniture and Ceramics 

0. E. Wynn 

Bookkeeping <m<i Accounting 

Mrs. Gladys Zilch, 

Shorthand and Typing 



\ R MSTRONG JI'MOK i'OI.I.K G K 




ARMSTRONG BUILDING 



HISTORY. ORGANIZATION AND AIMS 

Realizing that there was an increasing number of young men and 
women who found it inconvenient or inadvisable to continue their edu- 
cation at out-of-town colleges. Mayor Thomas Gamble and a group 
of leading citizens conceived the idea of establishing a junior college 
in Savannah. These men. working tirelessly over a period of months, 
finally saw their hopes become an actuality when on May 27. 1935. 
the Board of Aldermen authorized the establishment of a municipally 
supported junior college to be governed temporarily by a commission 
of fourteen members appointed by the mayor. The first commission 
was composed of the following leading Savannah citizens: Chairman. 
A. Pratt Adams: Vice-Chairman, Thomas Gamble: Henrv Blun. 
H. L. Fulton. H. M. Garwes, H. F. Gibbons. H. V. Jenkins, H.'l. Kay- 
ton, Mrs. Mills B. Lane. A. B. Lovett. Frank W. Spencer. 0. B. Strong, 
Mrs. Lucy B. Trosdal, Miss Ola M. Wyeth. By an act of the 1937 



OF SAVANNAH, GEORGIA 9 

General Assembly the size of the commission was reduced to eight, 
including the Mayor and Chairman ol the Chatham County Hoard 
ol Education as ex-officio members. In 1944, the chairman of Chatham 
County Commissioners, the Superintendent of the Hoard ol' Education, 
and the President ol the Savannah Chamber of Commerce were added 

a- ex-officio members of the commi>inn. The day before the ordinance 
creating the college was passed, Mayor Gamble announced that the 
problem of housing the new school was solved by Mrs. Lucy M. C. 
Molt/ and her daughter, Mr-. Lucy A. Johnson, who had generously 
presented their beautiful house as a memorial to George F. Armstrong, 
their husband and father, respectively. Because of the many spacious 
rooms, remarkably few changes were necessary to fit the huilding for 
college purposes. The Armstrong Huilding. of Italian Renaissance arch- 
itecture, is one of the most beautiful and expensive college buildings in 
the South. 

In February. 1936. Mayor Thomas Gamble was awarded the Lucas 
Trophy for the conspicuous part he played in founding the Junior Col- 
lege. In his speech of acceptance. Mr. Gamble announced that he had 
receiyed the gift of a building from Mr. Mills B. Lane to house classes 
in finance and commerce, the building to be named in honor of the 
donor. 

Situated between the Armstrong and the Lane buildings is the 
Herschel V. Jenkins Hall, erected and equipped by the city of Savannah 
and the federal government at a cost of $70,000. All three buildings, 
standing side by side, face on Forsyth Park, the most beautiful park 
in the city, which consists of forty acres and is used by Armstrong 
students for recreational purposes. The Georgia Historical Society 
Library, to which the students have access, faces the park and lies just 
across Whitaker street from the college buildings. 

Under the will of the late Carrie Colding. one-half of the sale price 
of the Colding residence on Jones Street was conveyed to the College. 

A $100,000 science building to house biology, chemistry and physics 
was constructed by the city in 1941. This building, the Thomas Gamble 
Hall, is equipped with excellent laboratories and lecture rooms. 

In 1945 the handsome building on the southwest corner of Bull and 
Gordon Street was presented to the college in memory of John W. Hu:.t. 
It is known as Hunt Memorial Huilding. In December of that year 
the basement floor was constructed into offices and occupied by the 
Armstrong Junior College Veterans Administration Guidance Center. 



lo ARMSTRONG JUNIOR COLLEC I. 

In September, L946, the Home Economics Department will occupy 
this building. 

Armstrong Junior College seeks to serve Savannah and the adja- 
cent community b) giving to the young men and women who attend its 
classes an und< rstanding of the world in which they live and an appre- 
ciation of tlic besl that has been achieved by western civilization. Its 
graduates arc equipped to continue their studies in the junior class 
of a senior college; hut for those who do not desire to pursue their work 
elsewhere, terminal work is offered. The college attempt- to provide 
its student- with a keener realization of the duties and responsibilities 
of citizenship and a broader conception of the world and it- problems. 

Library 

The college library, occupying the first two floors of the Lane 
Building, include- two beautiful and well-lighted reading room- or 
the main floor of the building, with additional space for study and 
reading provided in the stack room on the second floor. The library 
houses at present over 6.000 volumes, with frequent and carefully 
chosen additions to its resources. Emphasis i- being placed currently 
on securing hooks dealing with adult education and with the rehabili- 
tation of returning service men and women, as well as on obtaining 
materials to meet the resular academic demands of a junior college. 
Standard reference works are contained in the library, and some 80 
periodicals are subscribed to. or otherwise currently leceived. Sub- 
scription to -ix new -papers, four of them daily, is maintained. The 
library is fortunate in being the recipient of a large and outstanding 
collection of history books, the gift of the late Mr. Thomas Gamble. 

Students are encouraged to read widely in the fields of fiction and 
non-fiction, and in particular to keep up with current periodical 
materials. In addition to the resources of the college library, students 
are invited to use the Savannah Public Library and the Library of 
the Georgia Historical Society, the latter only one-half block from the 
Junior College 1 . \n orientation course, dealing in part with training 
m the use of the library, is offered in the fall quarter of each year. 

1 lie library, which is under the supervision of a trained librarian and 
five students assistants, Is open each week-day from 8:30 until <>:<><>. 
and on Saturdays from 9:00 until 1:00. 

Laboratory s 

I he college ha- completely equipped laboratories in physics, chem- 




MILLS B. LANE MEMORIAL BUILDING 



istry, biology, and home economics. 

Scholarships 
The following scholarships are available for deserving students: 
4 Arthur Lucas scholarships. $100.00 each 

1 John Helm Maclean Memorial scholarship. $100.00 

2 Savannah Gas Company Home Economics scholarships. SI 00.00 
each 

3 Junior Chamber of Commerce scholarships. $100.00 each. 

2 Savannah Gas Company Engineering scholarships 8100.00 each 

8 Commission work scholarships. $100.00 each 

(Students who bold these Commission scholarships are assigned 
work as library, laboratory, or clerical assistants.) 

1 Pilot Club Loan. $100.00 

In addition to the above, the Savannah Gas Company gives a 



\ R M STRONG JUNIOR < oil. E G E 



hi 




THOMAS GAMBLE BUILDING 



scholarship of $300.00 to the Georgia School of Technology. This is 
open to any male student who completes three quarters of freshman 
engineering at Armstrong Junior College. One will be awarded at the 
graduation exercises in June. 1947. 

Armstrong Guidance Center 

In Decemher 1915 the Veterans Guidance Center began operation. A 
joint undertaking between the I nited States Government and the Col- 
lege, it employs a large staff of trained personnel to advise and help 
returned service men and women. The Armstrong Guidance Center is 
one of four similar psychological clinics in the Slate of Georgia and 
serves a territory including 38 counties. By the middle of May. 1946, 
approximately five hundred and fifty veterans had taken advantage of 



OF SAVANNAH, GEORGIA L3 



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VETERANS GUIDANCE CENTER 

its comprehensive testing and counseling program. The services of 
the guidance center are available, without expense, to all veterans 
who desire assistance with their educational or vocational planning. 
During 1946 the Center occupied quarters on the ground floor of 
the Hunt Memorial Building, in addition to a large room in the Arm- 
strong Building for Veterans Administration Training Officers. The 
following is a list of the Armstrong Staff employed in this service: 

L. Ross Cummins. Director 

Norman Kaplan, Counselor 

Mary Garrard, Counselor 

David Middleton, Counselor 

Jane McRae. Psychometrist 

Ethelyn U. Stults, Assistant Psychometrist 

Eleanor M. Salter, Secretary 

Margaret Holt, Secretarial Assistant and Psychometric Clerk 

Endowment 

Inaugurated in 1941 with contributions from some fifty members of 
the Alumni Association. Armstrong's Endowment Fund was greatly in- 
creased by a gift from the Morning News. The College hereby expresses 
sincere appreciation for these contributions. 



II ARMSTRONG JUNIOR COLLEGE 

Student Actix iiU \ 

Willi a fit in belief in the developmental function of individual or 
concerted group expression, Armstrong Junior College has made student 
activities an integral part of its program, with participation in one or 

more of it- organizations expected <»1 every student. At the end of each 
college year, at the Alumni Luncheon in June, those students who have 
taken part to an outstanding extent in college activities throughout the 
year are awarded a silver "A." A point system, gauging leader-hip 
activity and ability, determines who shall he the recipients of these 
award-. 

STL DENT SENATE 

The Student Senate is composed of the following representatives: the 

president of the sophomore and freshman classes: the editor of the 
Inkwell: the editor of the Geechee; one representative from each or- 
ganization recognized by the Senate: and two freshman representatives 
to be elected by the class one week after election of class officers. This 
group, which meets from time to time throughout the year, serves as 
the official student agency for coordinating college activities and for 
expressing student opinion. 

THE STIDENT FORI M 

The Student Forum meets twice each month for consideration of 
national, international and college topics which are of interest to the 
student membership. Discussions, debate- and guest speakers make up 
it- programs. The Student Forum usually sponsors a dance and a party 
during the year. The members of the Student Forum assist in many 
ways in making the Armstrong Forum a success. Membership is 
open to any student who wishes to join. An invitation is not necessary. 

BETA LAMBDA 

The Nome Economics Department maintain- a club which meets 
bi-monthly lor discussion ol current problem-. In addition to it- reg- 
ular scheduled nieeti;-. s, this club i- frequently responsible for the 
preparation and serving of refreshments at tea-, dances, and receptions. 
In the decoration of student lounge rooms and a home econ >m:cs 
class-room for art courses, practical experience is obtained in the pur- 



OF SAVANNAH, GEORGIA 15 

chase ol furnishings, and In their effective arrangement and use. 

ill sic < i.i B 

The Music ( lub meets twice each month for programs ol classical 
recorded music. Varied and well-balanced programs of symphony and 
chamber music are arranged, and occasionally music of a lightei 
Is included. Before each concert in the city, the Music Club presents 
the outstanding work announced for the concert, and in this manner 
serves to build up In it- members a familiarity with classical music. 

K\l>!<) CLUB 

The Armstrong Radio Club, youngest organization in the student 
activities program, exists for the purpose of giving students the oppor- 
tunity to participate in the preparation and presentation of various 
3 of programs over the air. Students who belong to thi> club receive 

a sreat deal of enjoyment in presenting entertainment, as well as 
valuable training which may be useful to them later in life. 

At present, the activities of this organization are somewhat limited. 
since it is impossible to secure radio equipment. Nevertheless, the 
Radio Club has, in addition to presenting assembly programs at the 
school, broadcast over the air through the facilities of a local radio 
station. A weekly panel discussion of topic- of current interest has 
been inaugurated this spring. 

The college plans to establish it- own studio, with complete broad- 
casting equipment, as soon as the necessary material- are available. 

HIDING CLUB 

The Riding (dub meets each Saturday morning for rides through the 
beautiful wooded bridle paths of the Ranch Riding School. Expert in- 
struction in riding is given to all beginner.-, and supervision is provide^ 
at all times if desired. Membership in this club ma\ serve as a part of 
the student".- physical education requirements. \ -mall monthly fee 



is charged. 



ATHLETIC TEAMS 



Basketball. Softball, and bowling team- are supervised by the Physi- 
cal Education Department. These teams play in the city tournaments. 



16 \ R M ST RON G .1 I N 1 <> R < <> II. E <; E 

SORORITIl S 

There are two social sororities recognized by the college: Alpha Tau 
Beta and Delta Chi. Membership in these groups is by invitation. 

PI BUCATIONS 

Students have complete responsibility for the two Armstrong publica- 
tions: the Inkwell, a monthly newspaper; and the Geechee, the college 
annual. Work on the Inkwell provides opportunity for news reporting, 
feature writing, and other expression of student opinion and talent, as 
well as for actual experience in the business management of the news- 
paper. Participation in the preparation of the Geechee furnishes excel- 
lent experience in photography, lay-out. and in organization generally. 
Here. too. facility in handling and financing a publication is acquired 
or increased. 

The Geechee Report is published by the Alumni Association. Its pur- 
pose is to keep the alumni informed of activities at the college and to 
help them keep in touch with other alumni. 

SW \NNAH PLAYHOUSE 

The Savannah Playhouse, a community theater sponsored and di- 
rected by the college, gives the students actual experience in acting, 
make-up. and the techniques of production. Discontinued for the dura- 
tion, the Playhouse will be re-opened as soon as practicable. 

Armstrong Junior College Forum 

Beginning in 1944 the Armstrong Junior College Forum arranged 
to bring to the college students and to the people of Savannah a num- 
ber of lecturers recognized as men and women of outstanding accom- 
plishment in national and international affairs. A group of citizens 
from the community, known as the Advisory Committee, cooperated 
with the Director in selecting the subjects and personalities to make 
up the programs for the year. 

The College bel r eves that such a series of lecture-forums is of great 
value to the student body and to the community at large, in that it 
provides an opportunity for hearing and discussing the opinions of 
recognized authorities on matters of public concern. 

The Armstrong Junior College Forum presented the following pro- 



OF SAVANNAH, GEORGIA 17 

mams during the L945-1946 series: 

Toni Sender, former member of the German Reichstag, "The Future 

of Germany." 
Waldemar Kaempffert, Science Editor of the New York Times, "Science 

Points the \\ ay to World Unity." 

Anna Louise Strong, the author of / Change \\ orlds and Other hook- 
on Russia. "Postwar Russia". 

Bishop G. Bromley Oxnam. President of the Federal Council d! 
Churches of Christ in America, "Religion and World Peace". 

Dr. Henry Pratt Fairchild. Professor of Sociology at New York Uni- 
versity. "The Future of Democracy". 

Dr. Hervey Cleckley. Professor of Neuropsychiatry at the University 
of Georgia School of Medicine, "The Psychopathic Personality". 

Stuart Chase, one of our country's leading and most popular econo- 
mists. "Where Do We Go from Here?" 

HOME-COMING 

Early in the Christmas holiday season the College holds the annual 
Home-Coming Reception to which all students and Alumni are invited. 

OPEN HOUSE 

Each Spring the College holds an Open House, to which all students, 
parents, prospective students, and townspeople in general are invited. 
At this time exhibits are held, the work of the students displayed, and 
typical scientific experiments demonstrated. Tours are arranged 
throughout the college buildings, and refreshments are served to all 
visitors by the Home Economics Department. 

Evening Classes for Adults 

To adults interested in advancing their education and information. 
Armstrong Junior College offers evening classes in varied subjects. 
Most of the classes carry full college credit to those students properly 
qualified, but require no specific entrance qualifications other than an 
interest in learning. The classes meet twice a week in one and one- 
half hour periods at times arranged to suit the convenience of the stu- 
dents. 



18 ARMSTRONG J UNIO/R COLL EG E 

Below are listed courses which have proved particularly popular it 

the pasl : in addition to those listed, courses will be organized in an\ 
subject for which sufficient demand exists. 

Biology 11-12. Human Biology. 

English 11. The Use of the English Language, Spoken and \\ ritten. 

History 10. World Problems Since 191 1. 

Mathematics 1. A Survey Course in Principle- of Mathematics. 

Psychology 32. Applied Psychology. 

Psychology 33. Social Psychology. 

Spanish 1-2. Introductory Spanish. 

Architecture 1. Home Design and Planning Homes for the Future. 

Art 12. Art in Everyday Life. 

Bacteriology 1. A Laboratory Course in Practical Bacteriology. 

History 11. Know Your Allies. 

Mathematics 11. Engineering Mathematics. 

Psychology 34. Major Theories of Personality Development. 

Radio 1. Management and Broadcasting. 

Sociology 61. Family Relations. 

Bookkeeping and Accounting. 
Shorthand and Typing. 
Physical Science. 
Photography. 
Creative Handicraft. 
Furniture and Ceramics. 
Film Classics. 



OF SAVANNAH, GEORGIA 19 

REGISTR \TK)\ 

Registration for the Summer Session will be conducted on June 12 
from 9:00 to 1:00 and 3:00 to 5:00. For other registration dates see 

the academic calendar. \ll students will register on the firsl floor of 
the Vrmstrong Building In the registrar's office. 

Registration is not complete until fees are paid. 
Requirements J<>r Idmission 

IDUISSION BY CERTIFICATE 

1. A candidate for admission to Armstrong Junior College must be 

a graduate of an accredited high school with sixteen units of credit 

2. A general average of all high school credits amounting to five 
points ahove the passing grade, when figures are used, or one step above 
passing when letters are used, will be required. 

3. The following specific requirements must also be met: 

\. Eight constants — 3 units in English, 2 units in social studies. 
2 units in mathematics (1 must be in algebra and 1 should be 
in plane geometry), and 1 unit in science. 

B. Eight electives — 1 of these electives must be from the follow- 
ing subjects: English, social studies, mathematics, science, and 
foreign language. Four units may be from the vocational and 
avocational groups. 

A record of high school credits earned by the applicant shouid be 
made out on the proper forms by an official of the high school and 
mailed directly to the office of the registrar. This certificate becomes 
the property of the Junior College and cannot be returned to the 
applicant. 

ADMISSION BY EXAMINATION 

Students who do not meet the above requirement^ for admission b) 
certificate may take entrance examinations prescribed by the College. 
A fee of two dollars is charged for each examination taken. Entrance 
examinations must be completed at least one week before registration. 
Additional information may be secured from the Registrar. 



20 ARMSTRONG JUNIOR COLLEGE 

[dmission of Veterans of li orld War II 

In accordance with the recommendation of the State Department of 
Education that local high schools give diplomas to veterans who 
have completed four or more units of high school work in the local 
high schools and who make standard scores of 35 or more on each 
section of the G.E.D. test, or average standard scores of 45 or more 
on the whole test, Armstrong Junior College will accept veterans whose 
official test records show scores in excess of the above minimum and 
who are otherwise qualified. 

Fees and Refunds 

Fees will be charged according to the student load in quarter hours. 
A normal load is 16 to 17 quarter hours each term or quarter. 

5 quarter hours . . . $17.50 

10 quarter hours . . . 28.50 

15-17 quarter hours . . . 40.00 

A student who maintains a dean's list average will be permitted to 
take 20 quarter hours a term for $45.00. If for any reason other stu- 
dents are permitted to take 20 hours of work the charge will be $50.00. 

Students taking laboratory work will be required to pay a small fee 
for materials and equipment. This fee is indicated in the description 
of the courses found under "Courses of Instruction"* elsewhere in this 
bulletin. 

Each student is required to pay $2.00 once each year for a physical 
examination. 

A late registration fee of $2.00 will be charged any students who 
fail to register and pay fees on the day designated for registration at 
the beginning of each quarter, unless excused because 'of sickno-. 

Anyone withdrawing during the first thirty days of a quarter will 
receive a refund of one-half of the registration fee. No refunds will 
be made after the first thirty days of a term, and no refunds will be 
made to those dismissed from the college. 

Courses Dropped and Transfers 
Special permission from the Registrar is necessary to drop a subject 



OF SAVANNAH, GEORGIA 21 

or to transfer frona one subject to another. 

Explanation oj Course Credit 

\ course running five hours a week for our quarter carries 5 quartei 
hours, or 3 1 3 semester hours, credit. One quarter hour credit is 
allowed lor each laboratory period. 

// ithdrawals 

A formal withdrawal, presented in writing, is a prerequisite to hon- 
orable dismissal or re-entrance to this institution. Any student planning 
to withdraw should immediately make such intentions known to the 
administration of the school. 

Dismissals and Permission to Re-Register 

All students failing (except in cases excused before examinations on 
account of sickness) to pass at least one course other than physical 
education in any one quarter will be dropped from the rolls of the 
college. All students who fail to make an average of at least four honor 
points during the first three quarters' work at the Junior College will 
not be allowed to re-register. Withdrawal is recommended to all stu- 
dents with less than a "C" average at the end of the fourth quarter of 
college work, and at the end of the sixth quarter of college work a stu- 
dent must have an average of three-fourths an honor point per course 
in order to re-register. 

Reports and Grades 

Reports for every student will be sent to the parent or guardian at 
the end of every quarter. The reports are based upon the following 
system of marking: 

A plus (95-100) 4 honor points per course 

A (90-95) 3 honor points per course 

B (80-95) 2 honor points per course 

C (70-80) 1 honor point per course 

D (65-70) No honor points per course 

E (Incomplete) . . . Minus one honor point per course 

F (Failure) Minus one honor point per course 



22 ARMSTRONG JUNIOR COLL E G E 

An E J incomplete i may be removed I>y mean- stipulated by the in- 
struptor of the course in which the student received the grade K. An 
E not removed in the succeeding quarter automatically becomes an 1*. 

In order to graduate, a student must receive as many honor point-. 
based on the above grading system, as the number of courses required 
for graduation. 

Honors 

Students who maintain a grade of B or above in each course dur- 
ing a quarter's work will be placed on the Deans Scholastic Attain- 
ment List. 

The 20 r /c of (1) advanced students and (2 I students with less than 
six quarters' work who have the highest averages, provided this average 
is "B" or better, and have failed no courses, will have their names re- 
corded on a permanent Dean's List in a book for that purpose kept 
in the office of the President. 

Summa Cum Laude (with highest distinction I will be bestowed upon 
those receiving an average of 3 honor points per course. 

A valedictorian will be elected by the graduating class from among 
the five students with the highest scholastic average in the work com- 
pleted before the term in which the students graduate. 

Freshman }\ eek 

Tuesday. September 17. throughout Friday. September 20. 1946, 
will be designated Freshman W eek. All Freshman students will report 
in the Auditorium of Jenkins Hall at nine o'clock Tuesday morning. 
September 17. for the orientation and placement program. 

During this period' all freshman students will (a) be informed of 
the new problems facing them as college students and of the type of 
study needed to use their advantages wisely, (hi be given physical 
examinations at the Savannah Health Center for a fee of $2.00. (c) 
be given a series of tests to help them and their advisers plan their 
curriculum wisely, and id) be shown the rules and told of the extra- 
curricular activities of Armstrong Junior College. Each student will, 
at this time, be introduced to one of the faculty members who will act 
as his counsellor. The physical examinations given at this time are 
required of all students. Dr. Helen Sharplev will examine the women, 



OF SA> \ \ \ \ ll . GEORGIA 

ami another doctor, to be announced later, will examine the men. 

ibsence from (hiss mul Tardiness 

\n\ student who i- absent From a class in excess of three times 
during one quarter must present a satisfactory written explanation 

to Hit" instructor in Order l<> recehe credit lor that course. A student 
who misses an announced test must, within a week, present to the 

instructor a written explanation of his absence, and a written request 
that lie he permitted to make it up. It is the responsibility of the >tu- 
dent. not the instructor, to make arrangements lor this make-up. A 
student who enters a class after the roll has been checked will he 
marked absent 

(curse Requirements for Graduation 
A student must maintain an average of "C" to graduate. 

Liberal Arts Quarter Houn 

f Biology 1-2. or Chemistry 1-2 ^"" 

or Physics 21-22 10 

All students who plan to major in a natural science 

are required to take Chemistry 21, 22. 23. 

^ Economics 21 l Introductory) K . . . ' ^ \ 

Englis'h 11-12 (Freshman) KH 

World Literature 1-2 .. [^ loj 

Foreign Language . . . \ 10 *A 

History la and 11) <££/) LO 

Mathematics 1 (Introductory) or 

Mathematics 2 (CoHege Ugebra) 5 

Ten hours from the following: 

Psychology 31 . 32. 33 

Political Science wf 

Sociology 60 

Lahoratory Scien 

Foreign Language 10 

Physical Education 1-2 required 

. . . 



Stives 20 

Total 90 

/r s- 



24 \ I; MSTRONG .1 UNIO R < OLL EG E 

Home E< onomh s 

Biology 1-2 or 

Biology 11-12 (Human Biology) 10 

Chemistry 1-2 (Inorganic) 10 

English 1 1-12 (Freshman) 10 

English 23-24 or World Literature 1-2 10 

Art 11 5 , 

Home Economics 1 (Clothing! 5 

Home Economics 2-3 (Foods) 10 

Home Economics 5 (Home Furnishing) 5 

Home Economics 6 (Nutrition) 5 

History 2-3 or la-lb K) 

Mathematics 1 5 

Sociology 60 5 

Physical Education 1-2 required 

Totals 90 

Freshman Engineering 
Fall Quarter 

Course Quarter Hours 

Chemistry 21 5 

English 11 5 

Mathematics 2 5 

Engineering Drawing 1 2 

17 

Winter Quarter 

Chemistry 22 5 

English 12 5 

Mathematies 3 5 



OF S \ \ INN AH, GEORGIA 

Engineering Drawing - - 

French Or Spanish OF Social Science 5 

Spring Quarter 

Chemistry 2\ 5 

Mathematics 1 5 

Engineering Drawing 3 2 

French or Spanish or Social Science 5 

17 

Suggestions to Students in 

Regard to Courses 

In general, students who expect to continue their college work to- 
ward the degree of Bachelor of Arts. Bachelor of Science. Bachelor 
of Commerce, etc.. will take the Liberal Arts course at Armstrong 
Junior College. Students are urged to consult the catalog of the 
senior college or university which they expect to attend and plan their 
courses at Armstrong accordingly. 

Pre-Medical Students are advised to schedule all their electiyes 
(20 hours) as well as the last group requirements of 10 hours in the 
laboratory sciences (biology, chemistry, physics I in order that the) 
may be able to complete requirements for admission to medical school 
within one year after graduation from Armstrong. 

Program for Student Nurses 

Armstrong Junior College, in cooperation with the Candler Hospital. 
ofTers the following program for student nurses: 

Anatomy In and Physiology In 6 

English In 3 

Sociology 61n 3 

Microbiology In 3 

Chemistry 13n 4 



26 ARMSTRONG JUNIOR COLL K G E 

Nursing In 1 

*Nursing 2n and 3n 

•Nursing \rts 4n 4 

Psychology In 3 

Home Economics 2n 3 

"Home Economics 5n 2 

"Physical Education In 1 

"Physical Education 2n 1 

Total 11 

* Courses given by Candler Hospital 



OF SA> VNNAH, GEORGIA 

( 01 RSE DESCRIPTIONS FOR M RSES I 01 RSI - 

Anatomy In Two lecture or recitation periods and one hhree- 
hour laboratory period. The course runs through two quarters, or ma) 
be conducted in one quarter. Fee, $2.50 cadi quarter. 

This course is conducted concurrently with the course in physiology, 
thus integrating the subject matter. The course includes both gross and 
microscopical anatomy. Lecture-, demonstrations and some dissection. 

Physiology In I his course is conducted concurrently with the course 
in anatomy. In the integration of the two courses, a basic understanding 
of the functions of the normal human body is presented so as to enable 
the student better to understand health, nutrition, and the pathological 
changes due to disease. The blood group of each student is ascertained 
and recorded. The methods of instruction are the same as in anatomy. 

Microbiology In — Two lecture or recitation periods and one three- 
hour laboratory period. Fee, $2.00. 

The title "microbiology" is used because it is that branch of biology 
that deals with plant and animal forms, while bacteriology includes 
only the micro-organisms of vegetable origin. The characteristics and 
activities of micro-organisms and their relation to health and disease 
are studied; also the sources, modes, and prevention of infection and 
isolation; disinfection and asepsis; tissue changes in the healing process, 
infections and neoplasms. Explorations of scientists in the field of 
microbiology and new discoveries applicable to health conservation are 
noted. Lectures, recitations, demonstrations and laboratory work. 

Chemistry I3n — Three lecture or recitation periods and one three- 
hour laboratory period. Fee, $2.50. 

The purpose of this course is to acquaint students with the principles 
of inorganic, organic and physiological chemistry with special applica- 
tions to nursing practice. General composition of blood and urine is 
studied: the students volunteering to eat certain diet- which show rela- 
tionship of utilization of foods, and kidney function through urinalysis. 

Sociology 2n — This course considers ( 1 ) the principles of sociology; 
(2) the nurse as a citizen of the community and as a professional 
worker: (3) the importance of the hospital among the social agencies 
in the community; (4) the patient in the hospital coming from the 



ARMSTRONG COLLEGE 



28 \ R M ST RONG .11 M <» R ( oil. K G E 

family and returning to the family. Three hours. 

Home Economics 2n Nutrition and Pood Preparation, three hours. 

The fundamental principles of nutrition and food preparation are 
considered. The nutrition requirements of children and of adults are 
compared. Special attention is given to the nutrition requirements of 
childhood and pregnancy. 

Psychology In — Three hours. This course is an introduction to the 
study of human hehavior with emphasis on the underlying principles 
of mental adjustments. The importance of the nurses own personality 
is stressed. 

English In — Three hours. A hasic course in the fundamental- of 
reading, writing, and speaking English. 



OF SAVANNAH, GEORGIA 2 9 

i 01 RSE DESCRIPTIONS 

Vrt 

Art II. \rt Principles mid Design. Two lectures and eight hours 
laboratory work each week for one quarter. Laboratory Fee, $2. .">(). 

\ study of the principles of art as seen in familiar works of art and 
as applied in problems of everyday life. Laboratory periods involve 
illustration of art principle-, textile design, and work with crafts. 

Biology 

Biology I . General Zoology. Three hours of lecture and four hours of 
laboratory work a week for one quarter. Laboratory fee, $2.50. De- 
posit $2.50. 

An introduction to the structure and functions of animals. Laboratory 
work emphasizes vertebrate anatomy. 

Biology 2. General Zoology. Three hours of lecture and four hours of 
laboratory work a week for one quarter. Laboratory fee, $2.50. De- 
posit, $2.50. 

A continuation of Biology 1 with emphasis on biological principles. 
The Invertebrate Phyla are studied in the laboratory. 

Biology 3. Invertebrate Zoology. Prerequisite. Biology 1 & 2. Three 
hours of lecture and six hours of laboratory work a week for one quar- 
ter. Laboratory fee, $3.50. 

A study of the structure and relationships of Invertebrates. Local 
forms in their natural habitat are emphasized. 

Biology 4. Vertebrate Zoology. Prerequisite, Biology 1 & 2. Three 
hours of lecture and six hours of laboratory work a week for one quar- 
ter. Laboratory fee, $5.00. 

A comparative study of vertebrate classes. 

Biology 21. Laboratory Technic. Prerequisites Biology 1-2. Three 
hours lecture and six hours laboratory a week for one quarter. Lab- 
oratory fee, $3.00. 

A course in methods of preparing microscope slides, preservation 



10 \ II \1 STRONG I I N [OR ( oil. EG E 

of tissues, and blood analysis. Methods <»l preparing tissues, staining, 
mounting, blood counting, blood typing and introductory work in 

clinical and laboratory chemistry are practiced. 

Chemistry 

Chemistry I and 2. Introductory General Chemistry. Four hours 
lecture and five hours laborator) a week for two quarters. Laboratory 
fee $5.00. Breakage Deposit $2.50. 

This is an introductory course designed to met the needs of non- 
science students. The preparation, properties, and uses of a number 
of the elements and their compounds are studied. 

Chemistry 21. 22. 23. General Chemistry. Three hours lecture ami 
four hours laboratory a week for three quarters. Laboratory fee S7.5d. 
Breakage deposit $5.00. 

This is a course in general descriptiye chemistry designed to meet 
the needs of those students who plan to major in the sciences. The 
fundamental laws are stressed. 

Chemistry 31. Qualitative Analysis. Prerequisite Chemistry 21. 22. 23. 

Three hours lecture and six hours laboratory a week for one quarter. 
Laboratory fee $5.00. Breakage deposit $5.00. 

The classroom work covers the theoretical background of the re- 
actions involved in the laboratory procedure-. A semi-micro scheme 

of analysis for both the cations and anions is used. 

Chemistry II. Quantitative Analysis-Gravimetric. Prerequisite Chem- 
istry 31. Three lectures and six laboratory hours a week for one quar- 
ter. Laboratory fee $5.00. Breakage deposit $5.00. 

This is an elementary course in quantitative analysis using gravi- 
metric procedure-. 

Chemistry 12. Quantitative Analysis -Volumetric. Prerequisite 
( hemistry 31. Three lecture and six laboratory hours a week for one 
quarter. Laboratory fee $5.00. Breakage deposit $5.00. 

This is an elementary course in quantitative analysis using volu- 
metric procedures. 



OF SAVANNAH, GEORGIA 31 

( OMMl R4 I 

( ommerce 51'. Beginning Typing, Five hours a week for one quarter. 
i Iwo quarter hours credit.) Laboratory fee, $3.50. 

I hi- course consists of introductory instruction in the technical fea- 
tures and care of the machine, position, fingering, proper technique and 
mastery oi the keyboard. \n average speed of thirty words a minute 
is attained. 

Commerce 52. Intermediate Typing. Five hours a week for one quar- 
ter. (Two quarter hour- credit.) Prerequisite Commerce 51 or equiva- 
lent. Laboratory fee, $3.50. 

Special emphasis is placed on business letters, carbon copies, manu- 
script typing, rough drafts, legal documents and tabulations. \n aver- 
age speed of forty words a minute is attained. 

Commerce 53. Advanced Typing. Five hours a week for one quarter. 
(Two quarter hours credit. I Prerequisite Commerce 51-52 or equiva- 
lent. This course offers the student special opportunity to perfect his 
typing technique. Special emphasis is given to speed building and 
practical application. 

Commerce 61. Beginning Shorthand. Five hours a week for one quar- 
ter. I Three quarter hours credit.) Theory of Gregg Shorthand. 

Commerce 62. Intermediate Shorthand. Five hours a week for one 
quarter. (Three quarter hours credit.) Prerequisite Commerce 61 or 
equivalent. 

Continuation of theory of shorthand and beginning dictation. 

Commerce 63. Advanced Shorthand. Five hour- a week for one quar- 
ter. (Three quarter hours credit.) Prerequisite Commerce 61-62 or 
equivalent. 

Dictation and Transcription. Student is required to take dictation at 
the rate of eighty words a minute. 

Commerce 2-3. Introductory Accounting. Three hours lectures and 
four hours laboratory a week for two quarters. 

Commerce 4. Accounting Problems. Three lectures and four hours 
laboratory a week. 



32 A R M ST R N G J UNIOR I OLL E G E 

Commerce 5. Marketing, Five hours a week for one quarter. 
Commerce 7. Money and Banking. Five hours a week for one quarter. 

Commerce 10. Insurance. Five hours a week for one quarter. 

Commerce II. Elements of Statistics. Prerequisite Mathematics 1. 
Five hours a week for one quarter. 

Commerce 31-32. Field // ork. Fifteen hour- per week for two quar- 
ter. Ten quarter hours credit. 

Economics 

Economics 21. Introduction to Economic Theory and Problems. Five 
hours a week for one quarter. 

This course presents a survey of economic thought of the past and 
present, makes an analysis of the economic institutions of today and 
examines some of the major economic problems in the modern world. 

Engineering Drawing 

Engineering Drawing 1. Six laboratory hours per week. Credit, two 
hours per quarter. Class limited to 25 students. Rent fc^ drawing in- 
struments and equipment per quarter. S2.50. 

Topics of study include lettering, the use of instruments, orthographic 
projection, auxiliary views, sections. 

Engineering Drawing 2. Six laboratory hours per week. Credit, two 
hours per quarter. Class limited to 25 students. Kent for drawing 
instruments and equipment per quarter. S2.50. 

Prerequisite: Engineering Drawing 1. 

Topics of study include sections, dimensions, limit dimensions, pic- 
torial representation, threads and fastenings, shop processes, technical 
sketching, working drawings, pencil tracing on paper, reproduction 
processes. 

Engineering Drawing 3. Six laboratory hours per week. Credit, two 

hours per quarter. Class limited to 25 students. Kent for drawing 
instruments and equipment per quarter. $2.50. 

Prerequisite. Engineering Drawing 2. 

Topics of study include technical sketching, piping and fittings, 



OF SAVANNAH, GEORGIA 33 

working drawings, ink tracing on cloth, working drawings from assem- 
blies, assemblies from working drawings, 

English \m> Joi rn \i.ism 

Journalism I. Three hours a week tor one quarter. Recommended for 
all stall members of college publications. 

This course i- designed to be of practical help to those students 
who wish to work on the college publications. The clas> meets two 
hours per week lor lectures on the theory of Journalism and two hours 
for laboratory practice. Students working on the staffs of one of the 
college publications will he allowed one hour lab credit for such work 
in place of the regularly scheduled Journalism laboratory. 

English 11. 12. Required Course for Freshmen. Five hours a week 
for two quarters. 

The first half of the course is devoted to a review of punctuation 
and the fundamentals of grammar, theme writing and vocabulary 
building. The second half of the course continues written composition 
and introduces the student to various types of literature. 

W orld Literature 1. 2. Required Course for Sophomores. Five hours 
a week for two quarters. 

A general survey of trends in literature from Homer to Hemingway. 
Students read and discuss selections from the works of the most 
prominent literary figures with particular emphasis on the cultural 
achievements of the West. In addition to the classwork each stu- 
dent is asked to select for further investigation an author or subjei I 
of especial interest to himself. 

English 4. An Introduction to Poetry. Elective. Five hours a week 
for one quarter. 

A study of the various types and forms of poetry with especial 
emphasis on the works of the more recent British and American 
poets. 

English 5 (formerly English 25). American Literature. Elective. 
Five hours a week for one quarter. 

A survey of American literature and culture. In this course the 
student reads somewhat fully from the works of a comparatively small 
numher of notable and representative American writers. The course 



34 \ R M ST RO NG JUNIOR (Oil. E G E 

is primarily devoted t»> reading and discussion, but each student i- 
asked also to selecl one particular period or author for concentra- 
tion, making reports and writing paper- in that phase of the work. 

English /.'). Advanced Composition. Elective. Five hour- a week for 
one quarter. 

Advanced writing practice. The course i- designed to equip the -in- 
dent to express his ideas in clear, well-organized, and interesting 
prose. Various techniques of composition are considered, hut the main 
portion of the course is devoted to the writing and re-writing of 
exposition. 

French 

French 1-2. Elementary French. Five hours a week for two quarters. 

A course for beginners. Grammar, oral and written practice, early 
reading of selected material in French. In the second quarter, the read- 
ing objective will be emphasized along with continued practice in con- 
versation and composition. 

French 3. Intermediate French. Five hours a week for one quarter. 
A course in review grammar. Oral and written practice: reading of 
selected texts. 

French 7. Introduction to Literature. Five hours a week for one 
quarter. 

A survey course with particular emphasis on the nineteenth century 
Written and oral reports on collateral readings. 

French 8. French Classical Drama. Five hours a week for one quarter. 
Selected plays of Corneille. Moliere and Racine are studied. Four 
plays are read in class and four plays read as collateral. 

French 9. French Short Stories. Five hour- a week for one quarter. 
\ study of the short story in France with varied reading and dis 
cussion of selected authors. 

History 

History la. History oj // estern Civilization from the Beginning to 

the Reformation. Required course. Five hours a week for one quarter. 
A survey of the political and cultural history of the .Near Fastern 



I 



OF S \ \ INN AH, GEORGIA 

and European civilization from the earliest times through the Ref- 
ormation. Attention is focused on political, philosophical, social, and 
religious doctrine- and developments. 

History lb. History oj Western Civilization from the End oj the 
Reformation to the /'resent. Required course. Five hours a week foi 
one quarter. 

This Is a continuation of History la. Special emphasis is given to 
the Commercial and Industrial Revolutions, the rise of political 
democracy in Europe and America, the extension of European culture 
to Vsia and Africa, the conflict- of European states, and the recent 
and contemporary developments in Europe and America. 

History 5. English History. History of England and the British Em- 
pire. Five hours a week for one quarter. 

A study of English political and social institutions from early time- 
to the present with special emphasis given to developments since the 
Tudor period. 

History 6. Latin America. Five hours a week for one quarter. 
This course deals with the colonial, revolutionary and recent develop- 
ments in the countries of Hispanic America. 

Home Economics 

Home Economics I. Clothing. Three lectures and six hours laboratory 
each week for one quarter. 

This course is designed to establish appreciation, interests, habits, 
and attitudes as guides in selection, purchase, design, construction, and 
care of clothing. Problems are provided so that students gain exper- 
ience in application of these principles. A study of good grooming 
habits is included. 

Home Economics 2. Foods. Three lectures and six hour- laboratory 
each week for one quarter. Laboratory fee. $7.50. 

A study of the basic facts underlying food selection and preparation. 
The laboratory periods provide opportunity for practical experience 
in cookery. 

Home Economics 3. Foods. Three lecture and six hours laboratory 
each week for one quarter. Laboratory fee. S7.50. 

A continuation of the study in foods including different types of 



36 \ R \1 ST RONG I I M <> R < OLL E G E 

dishes used for specific purposes, food -election, meal planning, and 
table service. Students gain actual experience in all forms of family 
entertaining such as family meal.-, buffets, teas, receptions, etc. 

Home Economics /. Foods. For Men Only. 1 hour credit. 

\ practical course in cooking for men. Especially recommended for 
those interested in forestry or engineering. One unit will he devoted 
to the techniques of outdoor cookery. Class meets one afternoon each 
week. Laboratory fee, $5.00. 

Home Economics 5. Home Planning and Furnishing. Four lectures 
and one laboratory period each week for one quarter. 

A study of planning and furnishing the home from the standpoint 
of family needs; modern tendencies in housing and application of prin- 
ciples of art to home furnishings; a short history of architecture and 
furniture: study of furnishing various rooms emphasizing heating, 
lighting, and treatment of walls, floors, windows, together with selection 
and arrangement of furnishings. 

Home Economics 6. .\utrition. Five hours a week for one quarter. 
A study of nutritive requirements of individuals and family group-: 
relative costs of foods; dietary calculations. Emphasis is placed on 
nutritive properties of foods, and on the requirements for energy, 
proteins, mineral elements and vitamins. 

Mathematics 

Mathematics 1. Intermediate Algebra for College Students. Five 
hours a week for one quarter. 

A study of the fundamental operations of algebra together with 
factoring, fractions, linear equations, exponents and radicals, quad- 
ratic equations, graphical methods, progressions, and the binomial 

theorem. % J 

> 

Mathematics 2. College Algebra. Five hours a week for one quarter. 

This course begins with a review of factoring, fractions, exponents 
and radicals, linear and quadratic equations, and includes a study of 
progressions, the binomial theorem, and theory oi equations. 

Mathematics .')'. Trigonometry. Five hours a week for one quarter. 
A course covering the solution of the right and general triangle, the 



OF SAVANNAH, GEORGIA 

general solutions of trigonometric equations, and polar coordinates. 

Mathematics I. tnalytic Geometry. Five hour- a week for one quar- 
ter. Prerequisite Mathematics >. 

This course includes the analytic geometry of point, line and circle, 
conic sections, transformation of coordinates, polar ami rectangular 
graphs, ami parametric equations. 

Mathematics <S\ Spherical Trigonometry and Mathematics of Aviation. 
Five hour- a week for one quarter. Prerequisite Plane Trigonometry. 

This course is designed to give the student some of the practical 
aspects of spherical trigonometry a- applied to navigation and aviation. 

Meteorology 

Meteorology 1 . Introductory Meteorology. Five hours lecture a week 
for one quarter. 

An introductory course in the elements of the weather, including 
practical work with weather instruments, reading and preparation of 
weather maps, and the development of an understanding of the prob- 
lems involved in weather analysis. 

Physical Education 

Each student is required to take three hours of physical education a 
week throughout the year. The following program is provided: 

During the Fall and Winter Quarters emphasis is placed on basket- 
hall, calisthenics, games, relays, posture and corrective exercises. 

During the Spring the program includes softball. swimming and 
tennis. 

Physics and Physical Science 

Physical Science 11-12. A Surrey of the Physical Sciences. Five 
hours lecture a week for two quarters. 

A two-quarter course covering the general principles of the physical 
sciences. The first quarter is a survey of physics and astronomy: the 
second quarter covers chemistry, geography, geology, palaeontologv. 

Physics 21. Mechanics. Four hours lecture, two hours laboratory 
work a week for one quarter. Laboratory fee. S2.50 per quarter. 






ARMSTRONG II Moll < OLLEGE 



Deposit, $2.50. 

\ course dealing with the fundamental laws of mechanics. Emphasis 
is placed upon the solution of problems. 

Physics 22. Heat. Light and Sound. Four hours lecture, two hours 
laboratory work a week for one quarter. Laboratory fee, $2.50 per 
quarter. Deposit. $2.50. 

A study of wave motion and sound, heat, and light. 

Physics 23. Electricity. Four hours lecture, two hours laboratory 

work a week for one quarter. Laboratory fee. $2.50 per quarter. 
Deposit. $2.50. 

This course deals primarily with the principles of electricity and 
magnetism. Some of the newer concepts in the field of electronics, 

radiation, and atomic structure are also included. 



Psychology 

Psychology 31. Introductory Psych logy. Four hours lecture and 
two hours laboratory a week for one quarter. 

An introductory course in psychology, including discussions of 
learning, memory, behavior, psycho-biological relationships, morale, 
and motivation. 

Psychology 32. Applied Psychology. Five hours lecture a week for 
one quarter. 

A course in the applications of psychological principles in everyday 
life. Work includes personality and its improvement, public speaking. 
salesmanship, advertising, child psychology, psychology of music and 
art. personnel management, and other phases. 

Psychology 33. Social Psychology. Five hours a week for one quarter. 

'I his course is an introduction to the psychology of groups. An 
analysis is made of the physiological and socio-cultural motivation of 
the individual from infancy to adulthood from the standpoint of his 
group relation-hip-. Special attention is given to a study of leadership. 
the development ^A' radical and conservative qualities, propaganda, war, 
fascism, communism, delinquency and public opinion. 



o I SA\ INN AH, GEORGIA 



Pol I ! i< M. >« II N( i 

Political Science 12. Theories of Political Science and Ipplicati m 
of these Theories. Five hours a week For one quarter. 

\ study i- made of the theory and practice of governmenl an I 
politic- in the United Stale-. Great Britain, France, Switzerland, Rus- 
sia, and the pre-war Fascisl nations, [n addition, the workings of the 
United Nations Organization is observed. Each student concentrates 
on some aspect of the course thai particularly interests him, and re- 
ports his findings to the class. 

Political Science 13. Government in the United States. Five hours a 
week for one quarter. 

\ study is made of national, stale, and local government in OUT 
country in actual practice. 

Six i \i. Sciences 

Social Science !. Contemporary Georgia. Five hours a week lor one 
quarter. 

The purpose of this course is to familiarize the student with the 
problems of the state of Georgia and to make him more aware of its 
government, economic-, social and cultural activities. 

(Contemporarv Georgia is required for graduation from the I di- 
versity of Georgia. ) 

Sociology 

Sociology 60. Marriage and the Family. Five hours each week for 
one quarter. 

A study of family backgrounds, preparation for marriage, marriage 
interaction and family administration, family economics, problems of 
parenthood, family disorganization. A study of the family in the post- 
war period and present day trends in family life is included. 

Spanish 

Spanish 1-2. Elementary Spanish. Five hours a week for two quarters 
These courses are for the purpose of providing the student with the 
elements of Spanish by reading, composition and speaking. 



10 ARMSTRONG JUNIOR CO LLEG K 

Spanish 3. Intermediate Spanish. Five hour- a week for one quarter. 
Grammar review, composition and selected prose readings. 

Spanish 4. Advanced Spanish. Five hours a week for one quarter. 

The purpose of this course is to increase the student-' facility in 
writing and speaking Spanish. Selected masterpieces of Spanish litera- 
ture are read. 

Spanish 5. Commercial Spanish. Five hours a week for one quarter. 
A study of business letters and forms used by the Spanish-speaking 
world and of the vocabulary of trade, travel and communication. 

Spanish 6. Modern /'rose Readings. Five hours a week for one 
quarter. 

This course provides intensive reading of novels, plays and short 
stories of Nineteenth and Twentieth century Spanish and Latin-Ameri- 
can authors. 



SUMMER QUARTER. 1946, COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 

French 1. Elementary French. 10 hours a week for six week-. \ 
course for beginners. 

English 11. 10 hours a week for six weeks. Review of grammar and 
theme-writing. 

English 12. 10 hours a week for six weeks. Written composition 
and introduction to literature. 

History la. 10 hours a week for six weeks. Western world from 
ancient times through Reformation. 

History lb. 10 hours a week for six week-. Western world from 
Reformation to Summer of 191(>. 

Home Economics 5. 8 hours class plus one laboratory period a week 
for six weeks. Home Planning and burnishing. 

Home Economics 6. 10 hour- a week for six weeks. Nutrition. 

Mathematics I. Intermediate Algebra for, College Students. 10 hours 
a week for six w eeks. 

Mathematics 3. Trigonometry. 10 hours a week for >ix week-. 



OF SAVANNAH, GEORGIA »l 

Mathematics 5. Differential (olenitis, lo hours a week for six 
weeks. Prerequisite: Mathematics 2. 3, and I- or the equivalent. 

tf>[)li<(l Psychology. lo hours a week for six week-. The application 
of psychological principles in everyday life. 

Spanish I. Elementary Spanish. 10 hours a week for six week-. 



VSSEMBU \)\\ SCHEDULE REGULAR DAILY SCHEDULE 

8:30- 9:15 8:30- 9:20 

9:25- 10:10 9:30-10:20 

10:20- 11:05 10:30- 11:20 

11:15- 11:15 11:30-12:20 

(Assembly Period) 12:30- 1:20 

U:55- 12:40 1:30 . 2: 30 (Lunch) 

12:50- 1:35 2:30- 3:30 



3:30- 1:30 



Afternoon: 

Follow regular 

schedule 4:30- 5:30 



12 \ R M STRON G JUNIOR ( oil. E G E 

OFFICERS OF \I.l MM \>S<)( 1 VTION 

Mr-. Elise W. Shapiro /'resident 

Miss Marian Nelson Vice- President 

Mrs. Blanton \Y. Haskell s r <rct'ir\ 

Miss Celeste Norris Treasurer 



GRADUATES 01 1945 

issociate in Liberal Arts 

< . u — i<* Jim Moselej 
Mardette Neel 
Lillian Nichols 

Mary Lilla Palin 
Eloise Penn 
June Poindexter 
Willie Kate Purvis 
I harlotte Rosenthal 
Rose Scoville 
Marguerite Storer 
Sarah Maude Thorpe 
Janie Olene Waites 
Ruth R. Weiss 
Miriam B. Wills 
Geraldine Worth 
Anne Yarbrough 



I. ilia Claire Baker 
Lisette ( atherine Black 
Laura Carolyn Byrd 
Marina Capitan 
\nna Tallulah Cone 
Thomas Ed^ar Cone 
Beverly Fay Culbertson 
Virginia Danklefs 
W illiam Dismer 
Mary Foy 
("atherine Heyman 
Pauline Jones 
Louise Kaufmann 
Fifi Lamas 
Alice Matthews 
Mary Joy McGinn 
Mary McMillan 



issociate ifi Home Economics 



Ray Lucille Burton 
Elizabeth Hubert 



Comer Hymes 
Mariiuerite Smith 



PERMANENT DEAN'S LIST OF DISTINGUISHED STUDENTS 



Graduates 

Summa Cum Lnude 
"A' Average 

Lisette ( atherine Black 

Beverly Fay Culbertson 

( russie Jim Moseley 

"B Average 

Anna Tallulah ('one 

Virginia Helen Danklefs 

Grace Mardette Neel 

Lillian Nichols 

June Poindexter 

Willie Kate Purvis 

Marguerite Storer 



Non-Graduates 

" /" Average 
Everett S. Lee (2 quarters) 
■'/)"" Average 

Mrs. Sybil Woodward Bazuin 
Marie Bright 
Marjorie Chapman 

Patricia Felton 

Mrs. Edria Knapp Keeter 
Henrietta Kicklighter 
Mrs. Elsie Gibson Lawing 
Dorothy Mather 
Rose Marie Huffman 
Virginia I <ee Schaupp 
Janet Spillane 
Helene Ungar 
James Williams 



OF S \ \ \ \ \ \ 1 1 



GEORG1 \ 

Ml DENT DIRECTOR! 



13 



~\ll.n. Edythe 
Antonopolo, Georgia 
Baggs, Ruth 
- — Barnes, Mar) \ni.e 

Bli>». ( latherine 
— Boykin, Winwood 
—ttriiiht, Marie 

— Brown, Evel) n 

Browne, .Iran 

— Buckner, Emily 

^fiurnside, Betty 

« hapman, Marjorie 

< Saghorn, Margaret 

— (lark. Mar\ 
- — Crawford, Marv 
Danklefs, \ irginia 
DeFrank, Marion 
DuBois, Joseph 
Dupree, Gwen 
Fawcett, Sara 
Gaudry, Leolene 
Gilchrist, Mary 
Glynn, Jeannette 
Goldberg, Harold B. 
Googe, Joseph 
Gracen, Lillian 
( rross, Dolores 
Haile, Frances 

— Harris. Cecile 

— Hewett, Nelle 

—ileyman. Catherine 
c- -Hornstein, Helen 

, Johnson, Dorothy J. 

Kapner, Maxine 
Keeter, Mrs. Edward 

-. Kuhlke, Edith 



SOPHOMOR] s 

Laird, Mian S. 
I aw ing, Elsie 
_-l<,. i . S. 

Maguire, Elizabeth 
Malphrus, Florrie 
Mather, l>«>iuil.\ 
Meadows, Betsye 
fcliddlebrooks, Jane 
Mullis, Ruth 

— Munden, Billie Sue 
Myers, Robert 
Nash, Dearing 
Nielsen, Marv 

( Irsini, Marino 
Pali... Marv l.illa 
Parrott, Delores 
Roffman, Gloria 

^ — Roffman, Rose 
Ryan, Angela 

. , Saul. Semon 

Scha. ipp, \ irginia 
Schwitz, Isadore 
Shaw, Annie 
Simon, Nick 
Smith, Elsie 
Smith. Joyce 
Smithberg, Leon 

— Spillane, Janet 
Thompson, Eugene 

Ungar, Helene 
-- — " Waters. Elizabeth 
T ~- \\ ernicke, Anne 
\\ illiams, Davant 
Williams, James 
Woodward, Rupert C 
Yarley, Julie 



Freshmen 



Allen. Lawrence 
Allred, Marian 
Austin. Donald 
Bacot, Jules 
Bailey. Miriam 
Baker, Allie 
Barker. Lynn 
Beacham. Beve.lv 
Beall, Allen 
Beebe, Anne 
Birnbaum. Harriet 
Blackburn. Nellwyn 
Blumberg, Helen C. 



Branch. Irene 

Brewer, Elizabeth 

Brown. Jane 
Brunner, William 
Buchanan. Robert 
Buntyn, Betty 
Burch. Barbara 
Burke, William L. 
Burt. Robert 
Byers, Margaret 
Capetanakis, Grace 
Carter. Lourdine 
Clark, Grace 



II 



ARMSTRONG .11 NIOR COLLEGE 



< lark, Juanita 
Collier, Martha 
( olquitt, Ufred 
I olson, Mm \ 
( look, ( lharles M. 

ook, Pattie 
( lordes, I ois 
( lordra) . Bobbijane 
I orry, Jack 
• owan, Barbara 
I ox, Barbara 
Cox, Sue 
( Iraig, Stephen 
I rews, Vrcb 
( irovatt, Lorraine 
DeLoach, Daniel 
DeMars.John 
He Mars. Jean 
I >i\ ere, Helen 
Dillon. Frederick 
Dimmick, Robert 
Doerner, George 
DuPont, Mary Ann 
Durrence, Jack 
Durrence, Joanne 
Elmore, Tanner 
Evans, Allton R. 
Evans, Reginald 
Fitzsimons, Theodore 
Flanders. Beverly 
Foard, Helen 
Forman. Betty 
Foster, Ruth 
Freeman, Betty Ann 
Galin, Akin 
Goolsby, Sarah 
Gould. Robert 
Greene, Harold 
Hale, Charlotte 
Hall. Colleen 
Hamilton. Phillips 
I [ancock, Faye 
Harmon. Douglas 
I [elmey, Edgar 
1 [endrix, John L. 
1 lolTman. Mai ye Louise 
Hutchins, Edna Mm 
II vines, Natalie 
llvrne. George 
Jarrott, George 
Johnson. Dorothy Mae 

Johnson, Howard 

Kandel, Phillippa 

Kearney. Arthur 
Kenline, Patricia 
Kessler, Wiley 
Kiley, Robert 
Konter. Irvin 



Lebey, Mrs. ( lifford 

Lebe\ . Naomi 

Leigh, ( lharles F. 
I eon, Sarah 
Leonard, Elizabeth 
I niton. Doroth] 
Lippman, Ingrid 
Lipsitz Herbert 
Little. Wilbert N. 
I i\ ingston, Harry 
Lucas, ( Jarence 
L\ 1 1 ah. Savage 
Lynah, Wallace H. 
McGhee, Jerry 
Met -inn. Thomas I. 
McGraw, George, Jr. 
Mc'J :r, Samuel 
Mallory. James 
Mallory, Lois 
Mark-. Dixie 
Marks. Lvman 
Matthews. Ashbv. Jr. 
Meeks. Mary Alice 
Mitcluun. ( arolyn 

Montague, Mary 
Montgomery, Mary Ellen 
Mooney. Thomas 
Moore. Rette A. 
Moore, Lida 
Moore, Alan 
Morgan. Harve] 
Morris. ( Jinton 
Murphy. Carolyn 
Nease, Leila Ann 
Neher, Roy 
Nelson, Nancy 
New man. Derman J. 
Newman, John T.. Jr. 
\od\ in, Marvin 
Paine. Hampton F. 
Patterson, Joseph 
Petris. Pan! 
Platock, Koslvn 
Porterrield, Annette 
Pratt. Joan 
Prendergast, Mary 
Prince, I h \\< rj 
Halm. Henry 0. 

Redmond. Robert 
Reed. William 

Reisman, Louis 

Rice. Janice 
Rosenthal, Morris 
Rosolio, Man 

Ruble. Lenore 
Saseen, Barbara 
Scott, Gloria 
Scott. Joseph F. 



() I 



\ \ \ \ \ \ II . GE0RG1 \ 



i. 



Nvkin 


tier, Barbara 


See, Joyce 




Siee, 1 


idwai 


.1 (han 


Sigman, Fn 


d 


Sitler, 


Willi 


am 


Slotin, 


Han 


i- 


Smith, 


ML. 


ita 


Smith. 


Fred 


erick 


Smith, 


Jack 11. 


Smith, 


May 


Ann 


Smith 


Jose 


>hS.,Jr. 


Snead 


Leal 


e 



Solomon-. ( harles E. 



opeir 



Ih 



Stokes, Thomas A. 
Stroble, James I . 



Sullivan, Ruth 

I pchurch, ( -<'"i "•■ 

Walk,'.. Bettj 

Walk,-,. Mrs, Margue 

Vaughndori, Susanne 

Walsh, Belt] 

W al ion. I dwin 

W aters, Helen 

W heeler. Jane 

W illiams, \im 

\\ illiamson, ( harles 

W ood, James 

W oodward, \nne 

Yarbrough, Jesse 

^ ates, lame- i;. 



CANDLER HOSPITAL CADET NURSES 



\l II-. lot 11". W illie Mae 

Blocker, Jacqueline 
Brinson, Dorothy 
Bryant. Lorene 
( lothran, Marianne 
Dahlamer, Louise 
Da\ i-. Barbara 
Knight, Grace 
Lynn, Imogene 
Langford, Maurice 
Marsh, Annie Ruth 
Nutter, Sarah 
Olliff, Willette 
Pearson, Mary L. 



Purvis, Bettj Jean 
Robey, [ma Jean 
Ruble, l.cnore 
Sapp, Laura 
Shelnutt, Myrtle 
Siena. Georgina 
Sikes, Frances 
Smith, Florence 
Smith, Helen 
Stokes, Frances 
Warnock, Estelle 
West, Sue Nell 
W eston, Bertha 



KVKM\(i SCHOOL STl DENTS 



Alderman, Mrs, H. 0. 
Uexander, Leopold 
Alexander, Louis 
Allen. Harriette 
Anderson, Mrs. J. R. 
Armstrong, Mrs. J. J. 
Artley. Mrs. W. H. Jr. 
Asher, Mrs. Julius 
Austin, Donald 
Vxley, Mrs. Lowry 
Badenhoop, A. G. 
Bailey, Margaret L. 
Bazuin, Mrs. Sybil 
Beacham, Beverly 
Beasley, Mrs. M. J. 
Beckmann, Mrs. G. C. 
Beecher, Mrs. W. 0. 
Bernstein, Mrs. M. H. 
Belsinger, Miss Esther R. 
Berrier, Mrs. Florence 
Berry. Mary 



Berry, Peggy 

I5i -eh off, Frances C. 
Bradley. W. H. 
Braithwaite, Richard 
Brown, Jane 
Brown, Mrs. Louise 
Brown, Norwood 

Brown. Mrs. Wallace E. 

( larellas, ( George B. 

( arter. Mrs. Elizabeth 
Chaplin, Marjorie L. 
( hapman, Marjorie 
Charbonier, H. Y. 

Charlton, Mrs. T. J. 

• iure\ ieh. Julie 
Claghorn, Margaret 
(lark. Grace 
Collier. Martha 
( olson. Mary 
( lonnell, Kathryn A. 
Cook, Pattie 



If. 



ARMSTRONG JUNIOR COLLEGE 



( opeland, Mrs. Hoke 
1 01 liraj . ( rladys 
i owan, Barbara 

< ox, Barbara 

< ox, Sue 

( iraig, Mrs. Bessie 
( !ubbedge, Dorothy 
( ummins, L R. 
( iummins, Mrs. L K. 
Daniels, Gertrude 
Daniels, Mrs. Mildred 
Davids. Werner \. 
Davis, Mrs. A. S. 
Da\ is, Harriet 
Deegan, (Catherine 
DeHaven, ('lark 
Dixon, Edna 
Donnan, \\ ilia 
Doty, Dorothy 
Downing, John M. 
Drane, Mrs. N. 
Dunham, Edna F. 
Dunham. William F. 
Dunn. Miss Helen 
Dunn, Miss Mary 
Eason, Wynelle 
Ehrenreich, 11. S. 
Elfland, Josephine II. 
Ellis, Mrs. M. E. 
Fay, Captain R. W. 
Fay, Mrs. R. W. 
Fine. Mrs. Cda 
Flanders, Beverly 
Flanders, Mrs. I). E. 
Fowler, Miss Kathleen 
Friedman. Mrs. Pearl 
Friedman. \Y. Leon 
Fussell, Miss Fleeta 
Garlington, Henry F. 
Garrard. William 
Gibson, Louise 

Gibson, Ruth 
Gillikin, Sidney J. 
Gins, Walter Jr. 
Glynn, Jeanette 
Gnann, Dorothy 
( rOnska, Mrs. Leila 

( rracen, Lillian 
Greyson, Martha 
Groover, \nna 
I Liar. George F. 
1 [ancock, Faye 
Hand. Rudolph 
Hawes, Mrs. Foreman 
Hohenstein, Mrs. Rudolph 
Holloway, Mrs. W. G. 
Holt. Frank 
Holt. Mrs. Frank 



IL.lt. Mrs. R. W. 
I [ornstein, Helen 
Hussey, Mrs, I. J. 
Ivey, Joseph S.. J r. 
Jarrett, Elizabeth 
Jenkins, h. L. 
Johnson, Mrs. 1 [ugo 
Jordan, Miriam \Y. 
Jordan. Robert F. 

Kapner, Maxine 
Keeter, Mrs. Edria 
Kenline, Patricia 
Kenned] . M iss Rutli 
Kt'iuj--<lv. Sarah 
Kohler, Michael F. 
Kraft. Rose Marie 
Kramer, \lr>. Sam 
Lanier. Lois 
Langford, Mrs, W . \. 
Leacv, Miss Glad) s 
Lee, "E. S. 
Lennox. John L. 
Lennox. Mrs. J. C. 
Lenoir. Peggy 
Lewi-. Edna 
Litton, Virginia 
Lobrano, Joe T. 
Mallory. Lois 
Martin. Ruth 
Meadow-. Betsye 
Meeks, Donald 
Middleton, David 
Middleton, Mrs. Edwin J. 
M ixson, Ouida 
Montgomery, Mary Ellen 
Mooney. Thomas 
Mopper, Mrs. Valmore 
Morris. Alex 
Morris, Eugenia L. 
Morrison, Mrs. William 
Morton. F. C. 
Mulligan, Rebecca 
Munster, Ralph 
Met all. May 
Mr( alia, Miss Elvira 
McGee, Mrs. H. H. 

Mc( rreevy, Leonard F. 

McMillan, Marx 
Nichols, Ira L. 
O'Neal, Charles 
Parrott, Delores 
Leak. Mrs. W. G 
Persse, Margaret 
Persse, Winnifred 
Peterson, Mrs. J. R. 
Pincknej . Mrs. Miles 
Pipkin. Mrs. E. C. 
PortnofT. Sidnev 






or SA> VNNAII. GEORGIA 



17 



Pratt, Lois 

i 'rendei (cast, M n \ 

Proctor, Doi i- I . 

Prosser, Arthur 

Quattlebaum, Dr, Julian 

Quattlebaum, Mrs. Julian 

Ravenel, Elizabeth 

Ray, Ma... I . 

Ka\ mond, Miss Dorothy 

Richman, 1 lai rj 

Rips, Mr-. Lillian 

Rips, Merle Y 
Risley, Mrs. Ernest 
Rislei . King 
Robertson, Siegvart 
Rossignol, Margarel 
Rom an. M rs. 1.. \. 
Russell, Marie M. 
Russell, Mrs, R. II.. Jr. 
Russell, Richard W. 
K\ berg, Mary Lou 
Sandefur, Thelma 
Saxon, Susan 
Schafer, Helen 
Scheider, IVin'.'le 
Schwitz. Isadore 
Seckinger, David \\ . 
Shewmaker, Marian 
Sledge, H. A. 
Smith, May Ann 
Stephens, Judge \Y. Ilu-li 
Stephens, Mrs. W. Hugh 
Stephenson, Bobbie 
S'ri kland. (',. \. 
Taylor, Brantley 



I ew, Hattie 
Thigoen, Mrs. Jack 
l<»i i ance, lack 

I I .it ,-. t Had) b 
Trosdal, Mrs, I .. S. 
Tuck, Kntli 

I pchurch, ( reoi ge 
I aher, Mrs. ( harles 
\ aden, Maude 
\ann. Mi- Delia 
\ ining, Billy 
\ < > 1 1 » i 1 1 . Joseph 
\\ alker, I ouise 
Walk.-,. Lucille 
Ware, Mrs. ll<>\t 
\\ are, V irginia 
\\ aters, Nitton 
\\ eeks, Marguerite 
\\ nut/. Eleanor 
Wheeler, Elinor 
Wilburn, James 
Wilkin-. Miss EmmaC 
Williams, Mrs. Marian 
Williams, M rs. Sarah 
Williamson, A. K. 
Williamson, ( harles M. 
Willis, Mildred 
Wood, Mrs. Oscar B. 
\\ oodward, Anne 
Brandriff, Mrs. Robert 
Woodward, Mrs. G. D. 
Yellin, Harry 
Zahler, lr~~i.- 
Zoiifks, Rav 



BULLETIN OF 

ARMSTRONG JUNIOR 

COLLEGE 19471948 

A City Supported Junior College of Savannah, Georgia 




For Reference 

ot to be taken from this room 



^Jjolume XII Number 1 

is 



L947-1948 



MM MLR 



I ALL WINTLR SI'KI\(, 



BULLETIN OF 



Armstrong Junior College 



A City Supported Junior College 
of Savannah, Georgia 




I!i8i6 



MEMBERSHIP IN 

American Association of Junior Colleges 

Southern Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools 

Association of Georgia Colleges 



Volume XII 



Number 1 



ARMSTRONG COLLEGE 

LIBRARY 



"Education ts a companion which no misfortune 
can depress — no crim: destroy — no enemy alienate-^ 
no despotism enslave. At home, a friend; abroad , 
an introduction; in solitude, a solace; and in 
society, an ornament." 



i\ni \ 

Page 

ea 
Accounting 

Administration 3 

Admission Procedure 19, 21 

Alumni Officers 51 

Armstrong Guidance Center 1 1 

Art 42 

Athletics 16, 17, 44, 45 

Attendance Regulations . 25 

Biolog) 32 

Board and Lodging 15 

Calendar. L947-48 I 

Certificates Granted 16 

Chemistn 32, 33 

Clubs 13-15 

College Commission 1 3 

Commencement 16 

Commerce . 28, 29, 3 3-35 

Commerce, Associate in 

Course Descriptions 32-50 

Curriculum 24, 27-31 

Dean's List. 23, 51, 52 

Dismissal 23 

Drama 15, 38, 39 

Economics 36 

Education 3S 

Employment Opportunities 15, 16, 25 

Endowment 12 

Engineering. . 29, 36, 37 

Engineering, Associate in IS 

English . . 37, 38 

Enrollment 19, 20, 51-59 

Evening College 17, 57-59 

Examinations .1, 20, 21 

Extra-Curricula Acti\ ltics . 12-18 

Faculty 3, 4, 5 

Fees. ' 20, 21 

Foreign Languages 38-40 

French ' 39 

Freshman Week 23, 24 

Freshmen, 1946-1947 53-57 

Freshmen, Procedure for 19-25 

Geechee 14, 15 

German . 39, 40 

Gifts to the College.. 7-9,12 

Grades 21,22 

Graduation KS 

Graduates, 1946 51 

Guidance Center 11 

Historv 40, 41 

History of the College .7-9 

Holidays . 1 

Honor Points 22, 23 

Homecoming 17 






CO 



INDEX (Coin 

Page 



Home Economics 

Home Economics, Associate in 


28, 41, 42 
28 
42 


Hvgiene 

Index 

Inkwell 


42 

60 

14, 15 




3-5 




16, 17 




.43 


Laboratories 


8, 9 


Liberal Arts 


.27 


Liberal Arts, Associate In 


2~ 

.7-9 


Loans 


10, 11 


Mathematics 


43, 44 

42 


New Students 


19-25 


Nurses, Courses for. . 


48, 49 


Nurses, List of Student 


.57 


Opening Exercises. . . 


23, 24 


Organizations, Student 


13-15 




20, 21 




30, 44 45 


Physical Education, Associate in 

Phvsics 


30 

45, 46 




15 


Political Science 


46 




47 


Publications, Student 


14, 15 




23 


Refunds 


20, 21 




19-26 


Regulations, Student 

Reports 

Requirements for Graduation 


17, 18 


21, 22 


27-31 


Savannah Playhouse 


15 


Scholarships 

Science, Associate in 


10, 11 

30, 31 
32, 33, 45, 46 




13 




14, 15 




48 




52, 53 


Student Conduct 
Students, 1946-1947 
Summer Term 
Tests 


40 
17. 18 

52-59 

1 

1 




19, 20 


Transfers To Other Institutions 


20 


Veterans, Admission of 


20 


Veterans Club 


15 


Veterans Guidance Center 


11 


Withdrawals 


23 



oo 






ARMSTRONG JUNIOR ( oi.u (Jl 



ACADEMIC CALENDAR 
1947 1948 



SUMMER QUARTER 

/ irst Session 



Registration 
I Begin 
Examinations 



Registration. . 
Classes Begin 
Examinations 



Second Session 



FALL QUARTER 



Friday, June 13 
Monday, June 16 
Monday, lulv 21 



Wednesday, July 23 

Thursday, July 24 

Thursdav, August 28 



Freshman Counselling and Registration 
Upperclassman Registration 

Classes Begin 

Test 

Test 

Thanksgiving Holidays 
Examinations 

Homecoming 

Christmas Holidays 



September 23-26 
September 2527 

Monday, September 29 

Friday, October 24 

Wednesday, November 26 

Thursday-Saturday, November 27-29 

Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, December 1517 
Monday, December 22 
December 18-January 1 



WINTER QUARTER 

Registration Friday, January 2 

Classes Begin Monday, January 5 

Test Friday, February 6 

Examinations Monday-Wednesday, March 15-17 

SPRING QUARTER 

Registration Friday, March 19 

Classes Begin Monday, March 22 

Open House Wednesday, April 14 

Test Friday, April 23 

Examinations Wednesday-Friday, June 2-4 

President's Reception Friday, June 4 

Sophomore-Alumni Luncheon Saturday, June 5 

Graduation Exercises Monday, June 7 



r*-Jf 



I: 














THE COLLEGE COMMISSION 

Hbrschbl V. Jenkins Chairman 

William Murphby Vice-Chairman 

Gordon ( c ulson, Ex Officio Ormond IV Strong, Ex Officio 

H. Hansel Hillyi r, Ex Officio Fred Wessels 

Judge James P. Houlihan, Ex Officio Edgar L. Wortsman 
Hon. John G. Kennedy, Ex Officio Gunnar W. E. Nicholson 
Mrs. Julian K. Quattlebaum 

THE FACULTY 

Foreman M. Hawes, A.B., M.S President 

Arthur M. Gignilliat, A.B., M.A Registrar 

W. Orson Beecher, A.B., M.A Dean of Students 

William B. Baker, A.B., Emory University; Member American 
Guild of Organists. 

Instructor in English and Music 

W. Orson Beecher, A.B., and M.A., Emory University; M.A., 
University of Georgia. 

Instructor in Social Sciences 

Francis M. Brannen, B.S. in Chemical Engineering, Georgia School 
of Technology; Graduate study in Ch. E., Georgia School of 
Technology. 

Instructor in Engineering 

Elizabeth Colson, A.B., Georgia State College for Women; Graduate 
Study, Emory University Library School. 

Librarian 

FretwellG. Crider, B.S. in Chemistry, University of North Carolina. 
Instructor in Chemistry 

William M. Dabney, A.B. and M.A., University of Virginia. 
Instructor in History and Political Science 



ARMSTRONG fUNIOR COLLEGE 



Eleanor J. Doyle, B.S., Immaculata College; M.A., Catholic Uni- 
versity of America. 

Instructor in Spanish and Latin American Hi 

Mar i ha Bozbman Fay, B.S., Rockford College; M.S. and Ph.D., 
University of Illinois. 

Instructor in Biolog\ 

Mildred Gladys Feagin, B.S., LTniversity of Georgia. 

Instructor in Mathematics 

Arthur M. Gignilliat, A.B. and M.A., University of Georgia. 

Instructor in English 

Noma Lee Goodwin-, A.B., Duke University; Graduate Study, Duke 
University. 

Instructor in English 

Margaret Spencer Lubs, B. Mus., Converse College; A.B., Uni- 
versity of Georgia; M.A., Columbia University. 

Instructor in French 

Marie Lyons, B.A., Yanderbilt University. 

Assistant Registrar 
Harry B. Miller, B.S. in Ch. E., University oi North Carolina; 
Ph. D., University of North Carolina. 

Instructor in Chemistry 

Christine Wilson Minnix, A.B., University of Chattanooga, Gradu- 
ate Study, University of Tennessee. 

Instructor in Physical Education 

Marjorie A. Mosley, Associate in Finance and Commerce, Armstrong 
Junior College. 

Sect : 

Hinckley Murphy, IV A , \ anderhilt University; Graduate Study, 
Peahodv College and University of Georgia. 
Instructor in English 

Ira Lee Nichols, B.S. in General Engineering, Georgia School of 

Technolo^v 

Instructor in Engineering Drawing 






111! I U I I IV 



Margarbi Perssb, Associate in Liberal ^rts, Armstrong Junior College. 

Treasurer 
Julia Kbndau Russell, B.S. in Home I :onomics, Winthrop ( ollege; 

Graduate Study, Woman's College oi the University ol North 

Carolina. 

Instructor in Home Econonti 

James Holmes Scarborough, B.S.E.E., Emory University; Graduate 
Study, Emor) and Harvard Universities. 

Instructor in Physics and Mathematics 

Margaret Fortson Stephens, A.B., University of Georgia; LL. B., 

University of Georgia; M.A., University of Georgia; Certificate 
from the Sorbonne in Paris. 

Instructor in English 

Dorothy Thompson, A.B., Monmouth College; Social Work, Mil- 
waukee School of Social Work; M.A., Northwestern University; 
Certificate of Psychiatric Social Work, Western Reserve Uni- 
versity. 

Instructor in Psychology and Sociology 

Carmen Torrie, B.S. in P.E., Concord College; Graduate Study, 
University of Tennessee. 

Director of Athletics and Instructor in Physical Education 

Rachel Conrad Wahlberg, A.B., Lenoir Rhyne College; M.A., Uni- 
versity of Virginia. 

Instructor in German and English 

Helen C. Wolfe, B.S., Columbia University; Graduate Work, Teachers 

College, Columbia University. 

Instructor in Home Economics 

Gladys Nichols Zilch, Special Courses in Typewriting and Shorthand; 
University of Michigan and University of Florida. Diploma 
fiom the Gregg College (Normal School) in Chicago. 

Instructor in Commerce 



(jranii ._ 

solved by Mrs. i^.. . .. . & 

Johnson, who had generously presented their beautiful house as a 
memorial to George F. Armstrong, their husband and father, re- 
spectively. Because of the many spacious rooms, remarkably few 
changes were necessary to fit the building for college purposes. The 
Armstrong Building, of Italian Renaissance architecture, is one oi the 
most beautiful and expensive college buildings in the South. 

In February, 1936, Mayor Thomas Gamble was awarded the Lucas 
Trophy for the conspicuous part he played in founding the Junior 
College. In his speech of acceptance, Mr. Gamble announced that he 
had received the gift of a building from Mr. Mills B. Lane to house 
classes in finance and commerce, the building to be named in honor of 
the donor. 

Situated between the \rmstrong and the Lane Buildings is the 
Herschel V.Jenkins Hall, erected and equipped by the city of Savannah 
and the federal government at a cost of $70,000. All three buildings, 
standing side by side, face Forsyth Park, the most beautiful park in 
the city, which consists of forty acres and is used bv Armstrong 
students for recreational purposes. The Georgia Historical Society 
Library, to which the students have access, faces the park and lies 
just across Whitaker Street from the college buildings. 



Under the will of the late Carrie Colding, one-half of the sale price 
of the Colding residence on Jones Street was conveyed to the College. 

A $100,000 science building to house biology, chemistry, and 
physics was constructed by the city in 1941. This building, the 
Thomas Gamble Hall, is equipped with excellent laboratories and 
lecture rooms. 

In 1945 the handsome building on the southwest corner of Bull and 
Gordon street was presented to the college in memory o{ John W. 
Hunt. It is known as the Hunt Memorial Building. In December of 
that year the basement floor was constructed into offices and occupied 
by the Armstrong Junior College Veterans Administration Guidance 
Center. In September, 1946, the Home Economics Department oc- 
cupied the upper floors of this building. 

Armstrong Junior College seeks to serve Savannah and the ad- 
jacent community by giving to the young men and women who at- 
tend its classes an understanding of the world in which they live and 
an appreciation of the best that has been achieved by western civili- 
zation. Its graduates are equipped to continue their studies in the 
junior class of a senior college; but for those who do not desire to 



well as other stuuents. 

In addition to the resources of the college library, students are in- 
vited to use the Savannah Public Library. The main building on Bull 
Street has a union catalog listing the holdings of its branches; namely, 
The Downtown Branch on Bay Street and The Georgia Historical 
Society, which is diagonally across the street from the Armstrong 
Library. 

The library is fortunate in being the recipient of a large and out- 
standing collection of history books, a gift of the late Thomas Gamble, 
Mayor of Savannah. 

Under the supervision of a trained librarian and seven student- 
assistant librarians, the library is open each school day from 8:30 
until 5:30 and Monday through Thursday nights from 7:00 until 
9:00 o'clock. 

Laboratories 

The college has completely equipped laboratories in physics, chem 
istry, biology, home economics, and engineering drawing. 



Under rhe will at Sua \<*+< < — - - -' »• • ■- 

Scholarships and Loans 

The following scholarships or loans are available for deserving 
students: 

1 John Helm Maclean Memorial scholarship, $100.00. 

2 Savannah Gas Company Home Economics scholarships, $100.00 

each. 

2 American Business Club scholarships (one boy, one girl) covering 

all expenses for two years. 

3 Junior Chamber of Commerce scholarships, $100.00 each. 

2 Savannah Gas Company Engineering scholarships, $100.00 each. 

8 Commission work scholarships, $100.00 each. 

(Students who hold these Commission scholarships are assigned 
work as library, Laboratory, or clerical assistants 

1 Pilot Club Loan, $100. a) 

1 Beta Sigma Phi loan, $100.00. 

In addition to the above, the income from the Arthur Lucas Scholar- 



GENERAL [\EOk\l \T1()\ 11 



hip fund ot $25,000 makes available two or more scholarships per 



\ ear. 



The Savannah c i .is c ompany gives a scholarship of $300.00 to the 
Georgia School of Technology. This is open to am- male student who 
completes three quarters of freshman engineering at Armstrong Junior 
College. Inquiry concerning scholarship and loan funds should be 
addressed to the President. 

Armstrong Guidance Center 

In December 1945 the Veterans Guidance Center began operation. 
A joint undertaking between the United States Government and the 
College, it employs a large staff of trained personnel to help veterans 
with their educational, vocational, and personal adjustment problems. 
The Armstrong Guidance Center is one of five similar psyschological 
clinics in the State of Georgia and serves a territory including 38 
counties. By the middle of May, 1947, over 2,100 veterans had 
taken advantage oi its comprehensive testing and counselling 
program. The services of the guidance center (which include testing 
of mental ability, special aptitudes, school achievement, interests, 
and personality adjustment) are available, without expense, to all ex- 
service men and women. 

Since September 1946 the Armstrong Guidance Center has devoted 
Saturday mornings to testing children and serving other non-veteran 
clients from the community-at-large on a private clinic, fee basis. 
This service is available to Armstrong students at a special rate. Arm- 
strong has also had its facilities approved as a Testing Center by the 
Georgia State Department of Education. The guidance center is 
fortunate in having a close working relationship with two psychia- 
trists, both of whom have their offices in the same block within two 
or three doors of the college. 

The Center occupies quarters on the ground floor of the Hunt Me- 
morial Building, with a main entrance on Bull Street. The following 
is a list of the Armstrong Staff employed in this service: 

L. Ross Cummins Director 

William E. Hopke Counselor 

Mary Garrard Counselor 

Harriet G. Davis Counselor 

Frances B. Settle Counselor 

Jane M. Schroder Chief Psychometrist 

Sarah M. Thorpe Psychometrist 

Dixie C. Marks Secretary 

Julia L. Yarley . . . Secretarial Assistant and Psychometric Clerk 



12 



ARMSTKONCi JUNIOR ( OLLEGE 




Aptitude Testixg 



Endowment 



Inaugurated in 1944 with contributions from some fifty members of 
the Alumni Association, Armstrong's Endowment Fund was greatlv 
increased by a gift from the Morning News. The College expresses 
sincere appreciation for these contributions. 

Student Activities 



With a rirm belief in the developmental function of individual or 
concerted group expression, Armstrong Junior College has made 
student activities an integral part of its program, with participation 
in one or more of its organizations expected of every student. At the 
end of each college year, at the Alumni Luncheon in June, those 
students who have taken part to an outstanding extent in college 
activities throughout the vear are awarded a silver "A." A point 
system gauging leadership, activity, and ability, determines who shall 
be the recipients of these awards. 



Gl \l R \l INFORM \ DON H 



Studeni Sen at] 



The Student Senate is composed ol the following representatives: 

the president oi the sophomore and Freshman classes; the editor of the 
Inkwell, the editor or the Geechee; one representative from each 
organization recognized by the Senate, And two freshman represent- 
atives to be elected by the class one week after election of class officers. 
This group, which meets from time to time throughout the year, 
serves as the official student agency for coordinating college activities 
And for expressing student opinion. 

Tm Si im \ i Forum 

The Student Forum meets twice each month for consideration of 
national, international and college topics which are of interest to the 
student membership. Discussions, debates and guest speakers make 
up its programs. The Student Forum usuallv sponsors a dance and a 
party during the vear. The members of the Student Forum assist in 
main ways in making the Armstrong Forum a success. Membership 
is open to any student who wishes to join. An invitation is not 
necessary. 

Beta Lambda 

The Home Economics Department maintains a club which meets 
monthly for discussion of current problems. In addition to its regular 
scheduled meetings, this club is frequently responsible for the prep- 
aration and serving of refreshments at teas, dances, and receptions. In 
the decoration of student lounge rooms and a home economics class- 
room for art courses, practical experience is obtained in the purchase 
of furnishings, and in their effective arrangement and use. 

Music Club 

The Music Club meets twice each month for programs of classical 
recorded music. Varied and well-balanced programs of svmphony and 
chamber music are arranged, and occasionally music of a lighter vein 
is included. Before each concert in the city, the Music Club presents 
the outstanding work announced for the concert, and in this manner 
serves to build up in its members a familiarity with classical music. 

Radio Club 

The Armstrong Radio Club exists for the purpose of giving students 
the opportunity to participate in the preparation and presentation of 
various types of programs over the air. Students who belong to this 
club receive a great deal of enjoyment in presenting entertainment, as 



14 



ARMSTRONG Jl'MOR COLU Gl 




Test Evaluation 



well as valuable training which may he useful to them later in life. 
The Radio Club has, in addition to presenting assembly programs at 
the school, broadcast over the air through the facilities of a local 
radio station. The club engages in weekly panel discussions of topics 
of current interest over local radio stations. 

Riding Club 

The Riding Club meets each Saturday morning for rides through the 
beautiful wooded bridle paths of local riding schools. Expert in- 
struction in riding is given to all beginners, and supervision is pro- 
vided at all times if desired. A small monthly fee is charged. 

Sororities 

There are two social sororities recognized by the college: Alpha 
Tau Beta and Delta Chi. Membership in these groups is by invitation. 

Publications 



Students have complete responsibility tor the two Armstrong pub- 
lications: The Inkwell, a college magazine, and the Geechee, the 



G] M R \l [NFORMATION IS 

college annual. Work on the Inkwell Bulletin, mimeographed weekly, 
provides opportunity tor news reporting, feature writing, and ex- 
pression v^ student opinion. Student editorial and business talent is 
developed on all publications. Participation in the preparation of the 
Geechee furnishes excellent experience in photography, lay-out, and in 
organization generally. Here facility in handling and financing a 
publication is acquired or increased' 

The Geechee Report is published by the Alumni Association. Its 
purpose is to keep the alumni informed of activities at the college and 
to help them keep in touch with other alumni. 

Savannah Playhouse 

The Savannah Playhouse, a community theater sponsored and di- 
rected bv the college, gives the students actual experience in acting, 
make-up, and the techniques of production. 

Armstrong Veterans' Social Club 

The youngest social club is the Veterans' Club, formed in April, 
1946, and having over sixty members in April, 1947. The purpose of 
this group is primarily social, but projects to promote the welfare of 
the college are planned. This club sponsors at least one formal and 
three informal dances each school year, and a banquet each June. 

Membership is open to all veterans of World War II who are enrolled 
as students at Armstrong Junior College. 

Board and Lodging 

There is no plan for group board and lodging. Individuals make 
their own arrangements; but a list of homes seeking student boarders 
is kept in the office of the Secretary to the President. 

Out-of-town students are referred to the local Young Men's and 
Young Women's Christian Associations, whose dormitories are con- 
veniently located to the college. Prices for room and board at these 
two organizations are typical of those in this region. 

Employment Opportunities 

In School: A student seeking temporary or part-time work while 
in attendance should register with the President or the Registrar, 
making a statement as to his experiences and abilities. At the same 
time, a student should indicate the type of employment most desired. 
The college in this way may help the student get the type of work- 
most helpful to him as work experience, in addition to assisting him 



16 ARMSTRONG J UNIOR COLLEGE 

with his current expenses. Records concerning each student and the 
quality of his work becomes a part of his permanent file, the in- 
formation to be used in determining recommendations for the student in 
cases of permanent employment both before and after leaving college. 

Out of School: The college maintains a Placement Service open to 
all registrants at Armstrong Junior College. Every student wishing 
assistance in finding a position is urged to register with the Instructor 
in Charge oi Commercial Subjects. While no guarantee of employ- 
ment can be made, the placement supervisor will help the qualified 
student find suitable work. At the present time, there is a demand for 
qualified workers. 

Commencement Exercises 

Commencement exercises are held once each year. At this time, the 
title of "Associate in Arts", "Associate in Home Economics", etc., 
is received bv those who have completed the requirements for gradu- 
ation. Recognition is given those who win scholarships and those 
qualifying for scholastic honors. The Faculty an J Students participate 
in full academic dress. 

Athletics 

The college stresses an athletic program to develop qualities of 
sportsmanship and to further the aims of the required Physical Ed- 
ucation curriculum. 

Inter-ColUpatt Sports 

The college engages in competitive sports with other Junior Colleges 
and comparable teams. Basketball is the major sport. Other inter- 
collegiate sports include golf, tennis, and swimming. 

The Intramural Program 

The intramural program provides a variety of activities that will 
appeal to the students and bring about their active participation, now 
and in later life, in games and sports that are physically wholesome, 
mentally stimulating, and socially sound. We expect our program to 
employ a part of the student's leisure time in physical activity and to 
be a contributing factor to the social success of his school life. The 
program also provides opportunity for every student to participate in 
competitive athletics. It is organized as a phase of the physical 
education program. 



GJ M R \\. INFORM \1U>\ 17 



The program is administered by an Intramural Board which is com- 
posed of tiie Director of Physical Education, student Manager, and a 
representative from each independent social club, o{ which at present 
there are tour: The Loafers, Gators, Terrapins and Eager Beavers. 

The organization earning the highest number of points during the 
school vear shall have its name placed on the Intramural Plaque, 
which is located in the lobbv of the Armstrong Building. 

Home-Coming 

Earlv in the Christmas holiday season, the College holds the annual 
Home-Coming Reception to which all students and Alumni are invited. 

The Evening College 

To adults interested in advancing their education and information, 
Armstrong Junior College offers classes in varied subjects. Most of 
the classes carry full college credit to those students properly qualified; 
but for others, require no specific entrance qualifications other than an 
interest in learning. 

Adult Students 

All regular day or credit classes are open to adults who wish to 
attend as SPECIAL students. If college credit is desired, such students 
must meet the entrance requirements for regular students. Exemption 
from physical education requirements may be secured by petitioning 
the faculty. 

Student Conduct 

Armstrong students conduct themselves as ladies and gentlemen. 
Personal honor and respect for the rights of others is our standard. 

The following is quoted from the minutes of the College Commission 
for the students' information: 

"Hazing in all forms is prohibited at Armstrong 
Junior College. 

Drinking alcoholic beverages and gambling on college 
property is prohibited. 

Violation of these or any other regulations will subject 
the students to disciplinary action by the faculty which ma\ 
mean the expulsion of the offender or offenders from the 
college." 



18 



ARMSTRONG JUNIOR COLLEGE 



Organizations and groups using the name of the college in their 
social and other functions arc identified with the college and become 
subject to the same high standards of conduct and of supervision 
whether on or off the campus. The reputation of Armstrong is in the 
hands of its students. 

The act of registration at Armstrong Junior College constitutes an 
agreement by the student to abide bv the regulations as outlined in 
this catalog, or promulgated by the college commission, the faculty, 
and the student body. 



Registration 

lor Dates Sec Calendar on Page 4 

\l \\ Si l 1)1 \ Is 

\ student planning to enter the College should request an application 
blank entitled "Application tor Admission Card." When this com- 
pleted form is received by the Registrar, a check is made of the student's 
high school transcript. In the case of a transfer student, a check is 
made of his college transcript. A STl DENT PLANNING TO ENTER 
ARMSTRONG SHOULD REQUEST HIS HIGH SCHOOL PRINCIPAL 
OR THE COLLEGE REGISTRAR (in the case of a transfer student) 
TO SEND A TRANSCRIPT OF HIS CREDITS to The Registrar, 
Armstrong Junior College, Savannah, Georgia. 

A student planning to enter on the basis of the General Educational 
Development tests should request the Registrar to arrange with the 
Guidance Center for the administration of the entrance examinations 

Having checked the student's records for compliance with the 
minimum requirements for admission, the Registrar will send a 
notice to the student that he has been admitted to the college. It will 
then be unnecessary for the prospective student to take any further 
action until the date indicated in the calendar. However, any member 
of the college faculty or administration will be glad to talk with anv 
person planning to continue his studies in college about any problem 
confronting him. 

Admission By Certificat] 

1. A candidate for admission to Armstrong Junior College must be 
a graduate of an accredited high school with sixteen units of 
credit. 

2. No subject-matter units are prescribed. The high school pro- 
gram should be of such nature as to give satisfactory preparation 
for beginning college studies. Subjects which may be expected 
to contribute to this end are English composition and literature, 
natural science, history and other social studies, foreign languages, 
and mathematics. The right is reserved to reject an) applicant 
whose high school program docs not indicate adequate pre- 
paration for college work. 

A record of high school credits earned by the applicant 
should be made out on the proper forms by an official of the 
high school and mailed directly to the office o( the registrar. 
This certificate becomes the propertv of the Junior College and 
cannot be returned to the applicant. 



20 ARMSTRONG JUNIOR COLLEGE 



3. Three units in Mathematics and one unit in Physics or its 
equivalent is a prerequisite for admission to the freshman class 

in engineering. 

Admission By Examination 

Students who do not meet the above requirements for admission by 
certificate may take entrance examinations prescribed bv the College. 
A fee of two dollars is charged for each examination taken. Entrance 
examinations must be completed at least one week before registration. 
Additional information mav be secured from the Registrar. 

Admission To Advanced Standing 

Advanced credit will be allowed for work done in other institutions 
of proper rank and standing and for schools and experiences in the 
Armed Services. All work presented for advanced standing will be 
evaluated by the Registrar. To receive a diploma from Armstrong 
College a student must be in attendance the last two quarters taking 
a normal load, and in addition, must satisfv all the requirements of a 
particular course of study. 

Admission Of Veterans Of World War II 

In accordance with the recommendation of the State Department of 
Education that local high schools give diplomas to veterans who have 
completed four or more units of high school work in the local high 
schools and who make certain scores on each of the G. E. D. tests, 
Armstrong Junior College will accept veterans whose official test 
records show scores that indicate the applicant's capability to do 
college work. 

Transcripts Of Credits 

Each student is entitled to one official transcript of his college work. 
The charge for additional copies is $1.00 each. Requests for transcripts 
are complied with promptly. 

Library Fines 

Fines are assessed for failure to comply with library regulations. 
Students who are delinquent in their financial obligations to the college 
may not receive grades, reports, or other records of their work until 
such delinquencies have been adjusted. 

Fees And Refunds 

Fees will be charged according to the student's load in quarter hours. 
A normal load is 16 to 17 quarter hours each term or quarter. 



REGISTRATION 21 

/ ees for n tidents of Fees for other rest- Fees for non-\ 
itham County dents fGi rgia dents of Georgia 

5 quarter hours $22.00 $26.00 S^.oo 

10 quarter hours V^OO 43.00 54.00 

15-18 quarter hours 50.00 . 60.00 75.00 

\ student who was on the Dean's List the preceding quarter ma) 

take in excess of the norma! load upon payment of $1.00 per quarter 
hour for flic extra course. If for any reason other students are per- 
mitted to take work in excess of the normal load, the charge will be 
$2.00 for each quarter hour of the extra course. 

Students taking laboratory work will be required to pay a small fee 
for materials and equipment. This fee is indicated in the description 
of courses found under "Course Descriptions" elsewhere in this 
bulletin. 

Anyone wishing to audit a course (but not to receive college credit) 
may do so with permission of the instructor by paying a fee of $10.00 
for each five-hour course. 

A late registration fee of $2.00 will be charged any student who 
fails to register and pay fees on the day designated for registration at 
the beginning of each quarter unless he presents a doctor's excuse. 

Fees will be returned to students withdrawing during the first three 
days of any quarters. Anyone withdrawing thereafter during 
the first thirty days of a quarter will receive a refund of one-half of the 
registration fee. No refunds will be made afrer the first thirty days of 
a term, and no refunds will be made to those dismissed from the college. 

A fee of $500 will be collected from each candidate for graduation 
to cover cost of invitation, diploma, and rental of cap and gown. 

Reports And Grades 

It is felt by Armstrong Junior College that students in college who 
are old enough to vote should be held accountable for their own 
scholarship. Accordingly, report cards, warnings of deficient scholar- 
ship, and other such notices are not sent out to parents or guardians 
by the college except by request. Instead, the students themselves 
receive these reports and are expected to contact their advisers when- 
ever their school work is unsatisfactory. Report cards are issued at 
the end of each quarter. Warnings are issued in the middle of each 
quarter. Each student is assigned one especial member of the faculty 
to advise him or her; and in addition, the Registrar, Dean of Students, 
and all instructors are ever ready to help and advise any student seeking 
counsel. 



22 



ARMSTRONG JUNIOR COLLEGE 



Reports are based on the following system of marking 



A plus (95-100) 
A (90-95) 
B (80-90) 
C (70-80) 
D (65-70) 
E (Incomplete) 

F (Failure) . 



4 honor points per quarter hour 

3 honor points per quarter hour 

2 honor points per quarter hour 

1 honor point per quarter hour 

No honor points per quarter hour 

Condition must be removed 

during following quarter 

Course must be repeated 



An E (Incomplete) may be removed by means stipulated by the in- 
structor of the course in which the student received the grade E. An 
E not removed in the succeeding quarter automatically becomes an F. 

In order to graduate a student must complete one of the programs 
of study outlined in the catalog with an average of one honor point 
for each hour scheduled. 

Normal Schedule 

The unit of work for the regular student is 15-18 quarter hours per 
quarter. A normal schedule of sixteen quarter hours pre-supposes 
that the average student will devote approximately forty-eight hours 
per week to his college classes and to his preparation therefor. 

Permission to enroll for more than 17 quarter hours is granted when 
curricula requirements make such action necessary, or when evidence 
as to the capacity of the student seems to justify that the privilege be 
granted. 

Should a student's work load fall below the normal schedule, the 
student's parent or guardian (in the case of veterans attending school 
under Public Laws 16 or 346, the Veterans Administration) will be 
notified. 

A student may drop a course at any time during the first five week s 
of the quarter without incurring the penalty of a grade of "F" — Failed. 
If for a legitimate reason he is allowed to drop a course after that, a 
w/d (withdrawn) will be entered on his permanent record. Other- 
wise, the grade of F is entered. 

Explanation Of Course Credit 

A lecture course carries with it a credit of one quarter hour for each 
hour it meets during the week throughout one quarter. A course 
running five hours a week for one quarter carries 5 quarter hours, or 
3}^ semester hours, credit. Laboratory courses, as a rule, allow one- 
half quarter-hour credit for each hour of lab during the week. 



ki GISTR \ iu)\ 2^ 



Withdrawals 

A formal withdrawal, presented in writing, is a prerequisite for 
honorable dismissal from, or re-entrance into, this institution. Am 
student planning to withdraw should immediately make sue h intentions 
known to the administration of the school. 

Dismiss ULS \vn PERMISSION To Ri.-Ri (.ivit.r 

Am student failing except in cases excused before examinations on 
account of illness) to pass at least one course other than physical 
education in any one quarter will be dropped from the rolls of the 
college. Any students who rail to make an average of at least twenty 
honor points during the first three quarters' work at the Junior College 
will not be allowed to re-register. Withdrawal is recommended to all 
students with less than a *C" average at the end of the fourth quarter 
of college work, and at the end of the sixth quarter's work a student 
must have sixty honor points in order to re-register. 

Honors 

Students who have been in attendance for three consecutive quarters 
and who have achieved an average of "B" or better, and who have 
no grades below that of "C" will be placed on a Permanent Dean's 
List in a book for that purpose kept in the office of the President. 
The College will publish a Permanent Dean's List at the end of each 
academic year. 

Students who maintain a grade of "B" or above in each course 
during a quarter will be placed on the Dean's Scholastic Attainment 
List. 

The designation Summa Cum Laude (with highest distinction) will 
be bestowed upon those graduating with an average of 3 honor points 
per quarter hour. 

The designation Cum Laude (with distinction) will be bestowed 
upon those graduating with an average of 2 honor points per quarter 
hour. 

A Valedictorian will be elected by the graduating class from among 
the five students with the highest scholastic average in the work 
completed before the term in which the students graduate. 

Freshman Week 

Tuesday, September 23, through Friday, September 26, 1947, will be 
designated Freshman Week. All Freshman students will report to the 
Auditorium of Jenkins Hall at nine o'clock Tuesday morning, Septem- 
ber 23, for the orientation and placement program. 

During this period all Freshman students will (a) be informed of 
the new problems facing them as college students and of the type of 
study needed to use their advantages wisely, (b) be given physical 



24 \RMSTRONG JUNIOR COLLEGE 



examinations, (c) he given a series of tests to help them and their 
advisers plan their curriculum wisely, (d) he told of the extra-cur- 
ricular activities of Armstrong Junior College. Each student will, at 
this time, he introduced to the faculty memhers, one o{ whom will 
act as his counsellor. The physical examinations given at this time 
are required of all students. The women will he examined by a woman 
physician. 

How To Make Out A Program 

1. Decide what you are going to prepare for, after full discussion 
and consideration of your interests and qualifications with parents and 
friends who can help vou, and after interviews with one or more 
memhers o( the faculty, one of whom will be assigned as your adviser. 

If you can complete your training here, you and your adviser to 
whom vou have been assigned should make a tentative list of the 
subjects to be taken during each of the quarters you plan to be at 
Armstrong. Your adviser will keep a copy for future reference so that 
you may build your program each quarter with a definite goal in mind. 

2. If completion of your training involves going to another school 
after you leave Armstrong, the following steps are advisable: 

a. Secure the College's catalog and see what courses must be 
completed at Armstrong to meet the degree requirements at the 
senior college. 

b. Schedule the prerequisites for the courses vou wish to take 
later. 

c. Make a list of the subjects you will take at Armstrong 
Junior College for each of the quarters before you transfer, and be 
sure it includes all of the courses vou will be required to have for 
junior class standing. 

3. Faculty advisers will have work sheets to be rilled out in con- 
sultation with the student. 

Advisers Are Counselors And Friends 

No student should attempt to plan his course without consulting 
the bulletins of information issued bv the various state colleges, 
universities and departments of universities, Everv university, college 
or department has its own particular and specific requirements for 
entering regular third vear work; and unless the student is most careful 
in his selection of subjects during the first year, he will inevitably 
lose time, a feature which is entirely unnecessary if the student enters 
the Junior College with a full knowledge of University requirements. 



fcEGISTR \llo\ 25 



Likewise there are specific requirements for all sons of jobs and 

positions, and unless the student has satisfactorily fulfilled them, the 
jobs will not be Open to him. Do not try to Select pOUT courses with- 
out consultation with \ our adviser. It is not fair to you or to the 

College. 

Since the adviser is the individual to whom requests for personal 

recommendations are referred, the student is urged to acquaint the ad- 
viser with his whole program, including the entire SCOpe ot~ his activi- 
ties, hopes and aspirations, as well as his program of studies. Prac- 
tically all reliable enterprises now require personal recommendations as 
well as academic ratings. The officials of the school can assist man) 
to be placed in schools, industry, and in business when they can give 
a full and complete account of the student's personal as well as aca- 
demic qualifications. To this end all teachers are directed to file two- 
to-tivc word summary statements for each of their students to be used 
in the formulation of the recommendations which may later be re- 
quired. Such qualities as honesty, neatness, punctuality, loyaltv, in- 
dustry, dependability, ability to get along with others, etc., are of 
paramount importance. 

Recommendations 

The recommendations issued by the junior college are written in 
terms of the grades you earn and what your teachers think of vou as 
expressed by them at the close of your work in each class in a written 
report to the Registrar. These reports are a part of your permanent 
record. Thev correspond to employers' records of employees. 

Attendance 

Students are required to attend classes as scheduled. Any absence, 
whatsoever, from classwork entails a loss to the student. No absence 
is excused except for personal sickness, serious illness in the family, or 
other urgent reasons accepted bv the college faculty. FOR EACH UN- 
EXCUSED ABSENCE, IN EXCESS OF THE NUMBER OF CREDIT 
HOURS IN THE COURSE, the student will be penalized one honor 
point. It is the responsibility of the student to give to his instructor 
the excuse for each absence. Special departmental regulations may be 
applied for laboratory courses. It is the responsibility of the student 
further to arrange with his instructor to make up an announced quiz 
within a week of the date that quiz was given. At the discretion of the 
instructor a fee of $2.00, payable to the Treasurer prior to the make-up, 
will be charged. A student who arrives in class after the roll has been 
checked will be counted absent unless he presents the instructor with 
a satisfactory explanation of his tardiness. 



ARMSTRONG COLLEGE 

LIBRARY 



26 ARMSTRONG JUNIOR COLLEGE 



Students who make the Dean's list for two consecutive quarters 
shall be exempt during the ensuing quarter from the regulations 
governing absences and shall be exempt thereafter as long as the 
students maintain an honor roll average. To the foregoing regulation 
there are to be the following exceptions: (a) the privilege o{ absence 
does not apply to requirements of attendance relative to written or 
laboratory work or to quizzes and examinations; (b) the privilege 
earned by the student shall be forfeited if that student is absent with- 
out excuse immediately before or immediately after holidays; (c) it is 
understood that the instructor in any course has the right to consider 
participation by the student in class discussion as a necessary part of 
the work upon which he bases the final grade. Thus, a student having 
honor roll privilege w r ho absents himself more than the instructor 
thinks is reasonable for this purpose, may earn a lower grade, as a 
result of non-attendance, than would be shown by the examination 
grade alone. 



Course Requirements for Graduation 

Suggested Curricula 

All curricula suggested here are subject to modifications. Last- 
minute adjustments will be made. Check "Description of Courses" 
in this catalog and current schedule of classes for subjects to be offered. 

The curricula here outlined are suggestive only. They may be 
materially changed by the student in conference with his adviser, who 
will assist him to build a course of study upon his own interests, 
abilities, and previous training in the light of his chosen objective. 

The purpose of these courses is to accomplish a well rounded two- 
vear college program in preparation for some specific occupation, or to 
enter some higher technical course. 

Subjects are listed from 10 through 19, indicating work that is 
usually taken in the Freshman year and from 20 through 29 indicating 
subjects recommended for study in the Sophomore year. 

Associate In Liberal Arts 

This course, while cultural in content, also furnishes the first two 
years of the degree requirements for journalism, business adminis- 
tration, law, education, and majors in social studies, English, music, 
drama, or the foreign languages. Whether or not a student intends to 
continue his formal education, the liberal arts program of study in- 
creases his understanding of the world in which he lives and heightens 
his appreciation of it. 

First Year Second Year 

English 11-12-13 .... 9 English 21-22-23 .... 9 
History 11-12-13 or Mathematics 11-12-13' or 

Mathematics 11-12-13' . . 9 History 11-12-13 ... 9 



Foreign Language' 
Laboratory Science 
Social Studies* 

Electives 

Phvsical Education 11-12-13 



10 Social Studies* 10 

10 Electives 20 

5 Phvsical Education ... 3 

5 

3 51 



51 

1 If chemistry or physics is scheduled, mathematics should be taken in the first year and history in the second 
year. 

Students claiming credits for advanced algebra in high school will schedule mathematics 16-17. 

2 See "Foreign Languages" under course descriptions. 

3 Social studies include courses in history, political science, economics, psychology, and sociology. Advanced 
courses in foreign languages will also satisfy this requirement. 



:s 



ARMSTRONG JUNIOR COLLEGE 



Associate In Home Economics 

This course is preparatory for the junior class in a senior college 
offering a degree in home economics. Graduates End their services in 
demand both in teaching, government extension work, and in com- 
mercial fields. 

Students not intending to continue in college after leaving Arm- 
strong will find the courses invaluable in home-making and household 
management. 



First Year 




Second Year 




English 11-12-13 . . . 


9 


English 21-22-23 . . 


. 9 


Biology 11-12 .... 


10 


History 11-12-13 


. 9 


Home Economics 11 . 


5 


Home Economics 21 


. 5 


Home Economics 12-13 


10 


Home Economic 22 


. 5 


Mathematics 11 


3 


Chemistry 11-12 


. 10 


Physical Education 


3 


Sociology 21 


• 5 


Psychology 21 ... 


5 


Physical Education 


. 3 


Elective 


6 


Elective 


. 5 



51 



51 



Associate In Commerce 
(Secretarial Practice) 

Upon completion of this program of studv, the student should be 
able to fill competently the requirements of a secretary or book-keeper 
in the modern business office. This title is being added to the curricula 
as a result of the many requests received from employers for college 
students with secretarial training. 

A certificate (but not diploma) will be given students qualifying in 
the one vear stenographic course. A student who knows he has only 
one vear to attend college may herein master the tools that will better 
enable him to earn a livelihood. 

The following programs are terminal courses, not preparatory for the 
junior class of the Senior College. Students who plan to major in 
commerce in senior college should schedule the program of study out- 
lined under the associate in liberal arts course. 



Kl GISTR \llo\ 



29 



First Year 




Second Yen 




English 11-12-13 . . . 


9 


English 21-22-23 


. 9 


Commerce 




( ommerce L7 


. 5 


Typing 11 \-lU . . 


6 


Commerce 21 A.-B-C 


6 


Shorthand) 12 A-1U 


15 


( ommerce 22 A.-B-C 


. 15 


( omptometer L3 V.-B-< 


6 


t ommerce 24-25-26 


15 


History 11-12-13 . . . 


9 


Ph) sical Edu( at ion 


. 3 


Electives 


5 




— 


Ph) sicaJ Education 


3 




53 



53 
One-Year Stenographic Course 

English 11-12-13 . . . 9 

Commerce 11 A-B-C ... 6 

Commerce 12 A-B-C . 15 
Commerce 24-25-26 .15 

Commerce 17 5 

Physical Education ... 3 



53 



Associate In Engineering 



This program will satisfy degree requirements for the first two 
years of most types of engineering but should be varied for certain 
fields, such as chemical and electrical. The student should obtain a 
catalog from the senior college he plans to attend and have his adviser 
check his program with him against this catalog. 

Chemical Engineers should omit Engineering 21, 22, 23, 24, and 26 
and substitute one course in advanced chemistry. 

Architectural engineering students should plan to continue their 
second year elsewhere. 

The course requirements have been worked out in consultation with 
the Georgia School of Technology. 

First Year 
Mathematics 16-17-18 
English 11-12-13 . . . 
History 11-12-13 . . . 
Chemistry 16-17-18 . . 
Engineering 11-12-13 . 
Physical Education 11-12-13 





Second Year 




. 15 


Mathematics 21-22-23 


15 


9 


English 21-22-23 . . . 


9 


9 


Physics 21-22-23 


18 


. 15 


Engineering 21-22-23 . 


3 


9 


Engineering 26 . 


2 


3 


Economics 21 ... . 


5 


— 


Engineering 24 . 


3 


60 


Physical Education 21-22-23 


3 



58 



30 



ARMSTRONG JUNIOR COLLEGE 



Associate In Physical Education 

Service Courses 

All freshmen and sophomores will be given periodical examinations. 
On this basis, they will be divided into class one and class two. Stu- 
dents in class one will be given special exercises suited to their indi- 
vidual needs. Students in class two will be assigned regular required 
and elective activities. 

Services courses: 

Physical Education. 11-12-13 Required of all Freshmen. 
Physical Education. 21-22-23 1 Required of all Sophomores. 

The Physical Education Department is also designed to provide the 
first two years of preparation for a major in the field of Health and 
Physical Education for those students planning to enter the field of 
Education or Recreation. 

Each student planning to major in Health and Physical Education 
or Recreation is required to take the following courses: 

First Year Second Year 

English 11-12-13 .... 9 English 21-22-23 .... 9 

Biology 11-12 10 Nutrition (Home Econ. 23) . 5 

Psychology 21 (general) . 5 Mathematics 11-12-13 9 

History 11-12-13 .... 9 Child Psychology 24 . . .5 

Physical Education 11-12-13 5 Education 21 3 

Hygiene 11 3 Chemistry 11-12 ... 10 

Psychology 23 .... 5 Physical Education 21-22-23 ». 4 

Electives 5 Elective 6 

51 51 

1 Women will substitute P. E. 26 or 27. 

Associate In Sciences 

Students planning to major in science, medicine, dentistry, pharmacy, 
or veterinary medicine, or to be a Laboratory technician, or to go into 
any scientific field should select the following course of studies. 

This course is also recommended for students who wish to have 
deeper insight into the physical and natural world about them. Tech- 
nological advances require one to have a broad foundation in the 
sciences if he is to understand common, everyday occurrences. Since 
we live in a scientific age, this course is recommended as a terminal 
course. 



Rl tilSTR VTION 



M 



Firr/ y*tff 

English 11-12-13 . . 
Mathematics 16-17-18 1 
Chemistry 16-17-18 
Biology 11-12 . . . 
Physical Education 



52 



Second Year 



9 


English 21-22-23 . . . 


9 


15 


History 11-12-13 . . 


9 


15 


Foreign Language 2 


10 


. 10 


Physical or Natural Science 


15 


3 


Electives 


6 




Physical Education 


3 



52 



1 Laboratory technicians, pre-meds, ttt , should take Mathematics 11-12-13 or Mathematics 16-17, and elect 
another five hour course 

■us m a pre-meJual course should be from the laboratory sciences. 

2 See "Foreign Language' - under course descriptions. Pre-niedical students should ele<.t French or German. 



Course Descriptions 

(Each course carries five quarter hours credit unless 
otherwise indicated.) 

BIOLOGY 

BioloQ 11 General Zoology i. Three hours of lecture and four hours 
of laboratory work a week for one quarter. Laboratory fee, $2.50. 
Deposit $2.50. 

Biology 12 - General Zoology. Three hours of lecture and four hours of 
laboratory work a week for one quarter. Laboratory fee, $2.50. 

A continuation of Biology 11 w r ith emphasis on biological principles. 
The Invertebrate Phyla are studied in the laboratory. 

Bzolog} 1 21 - Laboratory Tecbnic. Prerequisites Biology 11-12. Three 
hours lecture and six hours laboratory a week for one quarter. Labo- 
ratory fee, $3.00. 

A course in methods of preparing microscope slides, preservation of 
tissues, and blood analysis. Methods of preparing tissues, staining, 
mounting, blood counting, blood typing and introductory work in 
clinical and laboratory chemistry are practiced. 

Biology 22 Invertebrate Zoology. Prerequisite, Biology 11-12. Three 
hours of lecture and six hours of laboratory work a week for one 
quarter. Laboratory fee, $3-50. 

A study of the structure and relationships of Invertebrates. Local 
forms in their natural habitat are emphasized. 

Biology 23 Vertebrate Zoology. Prerequisite, Biology 11-12. Three 
hours of lecture and six hours of laboratory work a week for one 
quarter. Laboratory fee, $5-00. 

A comparative study oi vertebrate classes. 
CHEMISTRY 

Chemistry II and 12 Introductory General Chemistry . Four hours lecture 
and three hours laboratory a week for two quarters. Laboratory fee, 
$2.50 per quarter; Breakage Deposit $2.50 per quarter. 

This is an introductory course designed to meet the needs of non- 
science students. The preparation, properties, and uses of a number of 
the elements and their compounds are studied. 



( OURS] Dl m FUPTIONS M 

Chemistry \6 % /", IS General Chemistry . Three hours lecture and foui 
hours laboratory .1 week for three quarters. Laboratory fee, $2.50 per 
quarter; Breakage Deposit $2 50 per quarter. 

This is .1 course in general descriptive chemistr) designed to tneei 
the needs o\ those students who plan to major in the sciences. The 

tuiul.uncnt.il laws are stressed. 

Chemistry 1A Qualitative Analysis. Prerequisite, ( hemistr) 16, 17, 
18. Three hours lecture and si\ hours laboratory .1 week for one 
quarter. Laboratory fee $5.00. Breakage deposit $5.00. 

The classroom work covers the theoretical background of the re- 
actions involved in the laboratory procedures. A semi-micro scheme 

ot analysis for both the cations and anions is used. 

Chemistry 25 Quantitative Analysis-Gravimetric. Prerequisite, Chem- 
istry 21. Three lectures and six laboratory hours a week for one 
quarter. Laboratory fee $5.00. Breakage Deposit $5.00. 

This is an elementary course in quantitative analysis using gravi- 
metric procedures. 

Chemistry 26 Quantitative Analysis-Volumetric. Prerequisite Chem- 
istry 21. Three lectures and six laboratory hours a week for one 
quarter. Laboratory fee $5-00. Breakage Deposit $5.00. 

This is an elementary course in quantitative analysis using volumetric 
procedures. 

COMMERc I 

Students who have had commercial training in high school mav 
schedule advanced courses involving skills by demonstrating then- 
abilities to meet the requirements of the beginning courses. 

Commerce 11A Beginning Typing. Five hours a week for one quarter. 
Two quarter hours credit. Laboratory fee $3-50. 

This course consists of introductory instruction in the technical 
features and care of the machine, position, fingering, proper technique 
and mastery of the keyboard. An average speed of thirty words a 
minute is attained. 

Commerce 11B Intermediate Typing. Five hours a week tor one 
quarter. Two quarter hours credit. Prerequisite: Commerce 11 A or 
equivalent. Laboratory fee $3-50. 

Special emphasis is placed on speed building, accuracy, business 
letters and carbon copies. An average speed of forty words a minute 
is attained. 



34 ARMSTRONG JUNIOR COLLEGE 



Commerce llC Intermediate Typing, continued. Five hours a week for 
one quarter. Two quarter hours credit. Prerequisite: Commerce 11A- 
1 1 B or equivalent. Laboratory fee S3. 50. 

Commerce 12A Beginning Shorthand. Five hours a week for one 
quarter. Theory of Gregg Shorthand. 

Commerce 12B Intermediate Shorthand. Five hours a week for one 
quarter. Prerequisite: Commerce 12A or equivalent. 

Continuation of theory of shorthand and beginning dictation. 

Commerce 12C Advanced Shorthand. Five hours a week for one 
quarter. Prerequisite: Commerce 12A-12B or equivalent. 

Dictation and Transcription. Student is required to take dictation 
at the rate of eightv words a minute. 

Commerce 1}A, 1}B, 13C - Burrough's Calculator and Comptometer. Five 
hours a week for three quarters. Two quarter hours credit per quarter. 
Laboratory fee $3-50 per quarter. 

The objective of this course is to build speed and accuracy in the 
operation of the Burrough's Calculator and Comptometer, and a 
thorough review of Business Mathematics. This is a two-year course. 
The first three quarters are devoted to the fundamental operations of 
the machine. 

Commerce 17 Office Practice. Five hours a week for one quarter. 
v Three quarter hours credit.) 

A course designed primarily to develop skill in office procedure, 
transcription, mimeograph machine, and a study of the various systems 

of riling. 

Commerce 18 - Business Organisation. Five hours a week for one 
quarter. 

Commerce 19 Modern Business Mathematics. Five hours a week tor 
one quarter. Prerequisite: Elementary Algebra. 

This course gives that background necessary for dealing with 
problems found in banking, real estate, financing, and accounting; the 
operation of the Compound Interest Law in business; simple problems 
concerning bonds, sinking funds, valuation of properties, annuities, 
and insurance. Practical problems in these fields will be emphasized. 
The necessarv aids and shortcuts with use of tables and logarithms 
will be studied. 



( OURS] 1)1 m RIP TIONS ^ 

wane 21.1, 21 B, _/(. Advanced Typing. Five hours a week for 
three quarters. Two quarter hours credit per quarter. Prerequisites 
c ommcrcc L1A-11B-1K . Laboratory fee $3.50 per quarter. 

A J\ anced T\ pine is .i course in the acquisition ol speed and accura< y 

including various legal forms and papers, manuscripts, and business 
papers. An average ol ( >; S words a minute is attained. 

22.1, 22I\ 22(^ Advanced Stenography. Five hours a week 
for three quarters. Prerequisite: ( ommercc 12A-12B-12( 

\ course in which the principles of Gregg Shorthand are applied in 
developing skill and accuracy in writing shorthand and in transcribing. 
The first halt year is devoted to dictation of general business material, 
the second half year, to dictation material applying to sixteen major 
vocations. A speed of 120 words a minute for rive minutes is required. 

Commerce 23/4, 23/3, 23C Advanced Calculator and Comptometer. Five 
hours a week for three quarters. Two quarter hours credit per quarter. 
Laboratory fee $3-50 per quarter. 

This course is devoted to practical business problems found in the 
various lines of business. Also speed building with accuracy in the use 
oi the machines is stressed. 

Commerce 24-25 Introductory Accounting. Five hours a week for two 
quarters. 

This is a course designed to familiarize students with accounting 
procedures that may come within the scope of their responsibilities. 
These two quarters are devoted to the development of the elements of 
the accounting cycle: personal accounting; accounting for proprietor- 
ship; purchases; sales; fixed assets and deferred charges. One work- 
book and one practice set is completed during this period. 

Commerce 26 - Accounting Problems. Five hours a week for one quarter. 

This course is devoted to accounting for notes; drafts and trade ac- 
ceptances; social security taxes; income, sales and property taxes; ad- 
justing and classifying accounts; preparing statements and closing the 
books. One workbook and one practice set is completed. 

Commerce 27 - Business Laic. Five hours a week for one quarter. 

Contracts: elements, required forms, avoidance of agreements, in- 
terpretation, enforcement. Negotiable instruments: elements of negoti 
ability, endorsements and transfer, liabilities of parties, discharge 
Sales: Vesting of title, warranties, enforcements, remedies. 



ARMSTRONG JUNIOR ( OLLEGE 



vmerci 2& Bmnn rj Law. 
icics, Partnerships, Corporations. 

I ( ONOMIC S 

/ 1 momics 21 . Introduction to Economic Theory and Problems. Five hours 
a week for one quarter. 

This course presents a survey of economic thought of the past and 
present, makes an analysis of the economic institutions of todav and 
examines some of the major economic problems in the modern world. 

ENGINEERING 

Engineering 11. Engineering Drawing. Six laboratory hours per week. 
Three quarter hours credit. Rent for drawing instruments and equip- 
ment, S2.50. 

Topics of study include lettering, the use of instruments, ortho- 
graphic projection, auxiliary views, section. 

Engineering 12. Engineering Drawing. Six Laboratory hours pet week. 
Three quarter hours credit. Prerequisite Engineering 11. Rent for 
drawing instruments and equipment, $2.50. 

Topics of study include sections, dimensions, limit dimensions, 
pictorial representation, threads and fastenings, shop processes, tech- 
nical sketching, working drawings, pencil tracing on paper, repro- 
duction processes. 

Engineering 73. Engineering Drawing. Six Laboratory hours per week. 
Three quarter hours credit. Prerequisite Engineering 12. Rent for 
drawing instruments and equipment, $2.50. 

Topics of study include technical sketching oi piping and fittings, 
working drawings, ink tracing on cloth, working drawings from as- 
semblies, and assemblies from working drawings. 

Engineering 21. Descriptive Geometry. Three Laboratory hours per 
week. One quarter hour credit. Prerequisite Engineering 13- 

Topics of study include the solution o( problems involving points, 
lines, and planes bv auxiliary view methods. Practical applications 
are emphasized. 

Engineering 22. Descriptive Geometry. Three Laboratory hours per 
week. One quarter hour credit. Prerequisite Engineering 21. 

\ continuation of subjects studied in Engineering 21 including 
solutions by rotation methods, simple intersections, the development 
of surfaces. 



< OURS! DJ m rum IONS r 

Engineering 23. Descriptive Geometry. Hiree laboratory hours per 
week. One quarter hour credit. Prerequisite Engineering 22. 

Topics studied include the intersection oi surfaces; warped surfaces 
Practical applications are emphasized. 

Engineering 24. Applied Mechanic/. Two hours lecture and three 
hours laborator) tor one quarter. Three quarter hours credit. Pre- 
requisite Mathematics 22 mk\ Physics 21. 

Topics of study include elements of statics, law of equilibrium ap- 
plied to machines and structures, law of friction applied to simple 
machines, and analysis of simple structures, trusses, and cranes. 
Problems will be solved both graphically and analytically. 

Engineering 26. Plane Surveying. One hour lecture and three hours 
Laboratory tor one quarter. Two quarter hours credit. Prerequisite 
Mathematics 17. 

Theory and practice in chaining, differential and profile leveling, 
traversing, topographic surveying, reduction and plotting o{ field 
notes, And mapping. 

ENGLISH 

English A. Five hours per week for one quarter. 

A non-credit course in the use of the English language. This course 
is a pre-requisite for English 11 for those students whose score on the 
English placement test is not sufficiently high. Attendance in this 
class may also be required of students in other courses whose use of 
English indicates their need for special work in language. 

English 11-12-1}. Freshman Composition. Three hours a week for 
three quarters. Three quarter hours credit per quarter. 

The first half of the course is devoted to punctuation And 
the fundamentals of grammar, theme writing and vocabulary 
building. The second half of the course continues written composition 
and introduces the student to various types of literature. 

English 21-22-23. Survey of World Literature. Three hours a week for 
three quarters. Three quarter hours credit per quarter. 

A general survey of trends in literature from Homer to Hemingway. 
Students read and discuss selections from the works of the most promi- 
nent literary figures with particular emphasis on the cultural achieve- 
ments of the West. In addition to the classwork each student is asked 
to select for further investigation an author or subject of especial in- 
terest to himself. 



->8 ARMSTRONG JUNIOR COLLEGE 



English 14. An Introduction to Poetry. Five hours a week tor one 
quarter 

A study of the various types and forms of poetn with special em- 
phasis on the works of the more recent British and American poets. 

English 25. American Literature. Five hours a week for one quarter. 

A survey oi American literature and culture. In this course the 
student reads somewhat fully from works oi a comparatively small 
number of notable and representative American writers. The course 
is primarily devoted to reading and discussion, but each student is 
asked also to select one particular period or author for concentration, 
making reports and writing papers in that phase of the work. 

English 26. Advanced Composition . Five hours a week for one quarter. 

Advanced writing practice. The course is designed to equip the 
student to express his ideas in clear, well-organized, and interesting 
prose. Various techniques of composition are considered, but the 
main portion of the course is devoted to the writing and re-writing oi 
exposition. 

English 27. Reading Modern Drama. Five hours a week tor one 
quarter. 

Students will participate in class reading and discussion of selected 
dramas. The plays will not be acted. The course is expected to im- 
prove the student's diction and reading. 

EDUCATION 

Education 21. Introduction to Education. Three hours a week for one 
quarter. Three quarter hours credit. 

A brief survey of the field of education, including the topics, aims, 
organization, methods of financing, curriculum, constructions, quali- 
fication of teachers, ethics of the profession, etc. 

FOREIGN LANGUAGES 

Students who have had two years of high school language recently 
should be prepared to enter either French or Spanish 21. Placement 

tests will be given students entering the 21-courses and thev will be 
assigned to the proper section accordingly. Students with one year o( 
credit may enroll in either an 11 or 20-course. Credit will not be given 
for both 11 or 12 and 20. 



(OIRSI 01 M RIPTIONS 59 



FREN( H 

French 11-12. Elementary French. Five hours a week for two quarters 

Five quarter hours credit per quarter. 

A course for beginners. Grammer, oral and written practice, early 

reading ot selected material in French. In the quarter, the reading 
objective will he emphasized along with continued practice in con- 
versation .ind composition. 

French 20. Five hours a week for one quarter. 

A review course in which French 11 and 12 will be covered in one 
quarter. It is designed for those students who have studied the 
language before but for any reason are not prepared to enter French, 
21. French 20 will be completed by them before they enter French 21. 

French 21-11 Intermediate French. Five hours a week for two quarters 

A course in review grammar. Oral and written practice; reading oi 
selected texts. 

French 2}. Introduction to Literature. Five hours a week for one 
quarter. 

A survey course with particular emphasis on the nineteenth centurv. 
Written and oral reports on collateral readings. 

French 24. French Classical Drama. Five hours a week for one 
quarter. 

Selected plays of Corneille, Moliere and Racine are studied. Four 
plays are read in class and four plays read as collateral. 

French 25. French Short Stories. Five hours a week for one quarter. 

A study of the short story in France with varied reading and dis- 
cussion of selected authors. 

GERMAN 

German 11-12. Flementary German. Five hours a week for two quarters 
Five quarter hours credit per quarter. 

Drill in fundamentals: Cases, principal parts of verbs, tenses, strong 
and weak verbs, adjectives. Vocabulary. Introduction to the noun 
declensions. Related reading. Second course devoted to additional 
grammar: the subjunctive, passive voice, pronoun types, declensions. 
Vocabulary building stressed in a graduated reading series. 



40 \KMSTRONG JUNIOR COLLEGE 



German 21. Review Grammar. Five hours a week for one quarter. 
Extensive rc\ ievt of all grammar. Advanced reading and writing. 

SPANISH 

Spanish 11-12. Elementary Spanish. Five hours a week for two 
quarters. Five quarter hours credit per quarter. 

These courses are for the purpose of providing the student with the 
elements of Spanish by reading, composition and speaking. 

Spanish 20. Five hours a week for one quarter. 

A review course in which Spanish 11 and 12 will be covered in one 
quarter. It is designed for those students who have studied the 
language before but for anv reason are not prepared to enter Spanish 
21. 

Spanish 21. Intermediate Spanish. Five hours a week for one quarter. 
Grammar review, composition and selected prose readings. 

Spanish 22. Advanced Spanish. Five hours a week for one quarter. 

The purpose of this course is to increase the students' facility in 
writing and speaking Spanish. Selected masterpieces of Spanish liter- 
ature are read. 

Spanish 23. Commercial Spanish. Five hours a week for one quarter. 

A study of business letters and forms used by the Spanish-speaking 
world and of the vocabulary of trade, travel and communication. 

Spanish 24. Modem Prose Readings. Five hours a week for one 
quarter. 

This course provides intensive reading of novels, plays and short 
stories of nineteenth and twentieth century Spanish and Latin-American 
authors. 

HISTORY 

History 1 1-12-1}. Historv of Western Civilization from the Beginning 
to the Present. Three hours a week for three quarters. Three quarter 
hours credit per quarter. 

\ survey of the political And cultural historv o{ the Near Eastern 
and European civilization from the earliest times through the Refor- 



( Ol RSI Dl m Kin IONS 41 

[nation. Special emphasis is given to the Commercial and Industrial 
Revolutions, the rise of political democracy in Europe and America, 
the extension oi European culture to Asia and Africa, the conflicts of 
European states, and the recent and contemporary developments in 
Europe and Amerk a. 

History 21. English History. History oi England and the British 
Empire. Five hours a week for one quarter. 

\ study of English political and social institutions from early tunes 
to the present with special emphasis given to developments since the 

Tudor period. 

History 22. Latin America. Five hours a week for one quarter. 

This course deals with the colonial, revolutionary and recent develop- 
ments in the countries of Hispanic America. 

History 23. Contemporary American History. Offered Spring quarter 
only. Five quarter hours a week for one quarter. 

The purpose of this course is to examine the major factors in the 
development of the U. S. from the Spanish-American War to the 
present time. Political, social, and cultural issues are examined and 
developments abroad which come into contact with the American 
scene are studied. 

HOME ECONOMICS 

Home Economics 11. Clothing. Three lectures and six hours laboratory 
each week for one quarter. 

This course is designed to establish appreciation, interests, habits, 
and attitudes as guides in selection, purchase, design, construction, 
and care of clothing. Problems are provided so that students gain ex- 
perience in application of these principles. A study of good grooming 
habits is included. 

Home Economics 12. loods. Three lectures and six hours Laboratory 
each week for one quarter. Laboratory fee, $7. 50. 

A study of the basic facts underlying food selection and preparation. 
The laboratory periods provide opportunity for practical experience in 
cookery. 

Home Economics 1}. Foods. Three lectures and six hours laboratory 
each week for one quarter. Laboratory fee, $7-50. 

A continuation of the study in foods including different types of 
dishes used for specific purposes, food selection, meal planning, and 



42 ARMSTRONG JUNIOR COLLEGE 



tabic service Students gain actual experience in all forms of familv 
entertaining such .is family meals, buffets, teas, receptions, etc. 

Home Economic* 21. \\<>wc Planning and Furnishing. Four lectures and 
on< laboratory period each week for one quarter. 

\ stud) of planning .\\^\ furnishing the home from the standpoint o( 
familv needs; modern tendencies in housing and application of prin- 
ciples of art to home furnishings; a short history of architecture and 
furniture; study of furnishing various rooms emphasizing heating, 
lighting, and treatment of walls, floors, windows, together with 
selection and arrangement of furnishing. 

Home Economics 22. Nutrition. Five hours a week for one quarter. 

A studv of nutritive requirements of individuals and family groups; 
relative costs of foods, dietary calculations. Emphasis is placed on 
nutritive properties of foods, and on the requirements for energy, 
proteins, mineral elements and vitamins. 

Home Economics 23. Art Principles and Design. Two lectures and 
eight hours laboratory work each week for one quarter. Five quarter 
hours credit. Laboratory fee, $2.50. 

A study of the principles of art as seen in familiar works of art and 
as applied in problems of everyday life. Laboratory periods involve 
illustration of art principles, textile design, and work with crafts. 

HUMANITIES 

Humanities 21 . Great Music. Three hours per week for two quarters. 
Three quarter hours credit per quarter. Laboratory fee, $2.50. 

A course designed to introduce the student to such varied musical 
forms as the fugue, the sonata, the symphony, the concerto, and the 
tone poem. The lives and general backgrounds of the major composers 
will be discussed. Lectures and class discussions will be supplemented 
by the playing of records. 

HYGIENE 

Hygiene 11. Three hours per week for one quarter. Three quarter 
hours credit. 

Freshman Hygiene should give the student an understanding oi the 
principle of mental and physical health. The aim is to educate the 
individual for sensible living in his environment. 



c OURS] DJ S( RIPTIONS 4} 



JOURNALISM 

journalism 11-12-1}. \\\ o hours pei \\uL foi thre< quarters Two 
quarter hours credit per quarter. One quarter required of .ill regular 
star! members ol college publications. 

I his class meets two hours per week for classes on the theory of 
Journalism. In lieu of one hour of lecture, two hours work on the 
st. itt of one of the college publications may he substituted. Students 
will gain practical experience in working out editorial, mechanical, 
and business problems dealing with a publication. 

MATHEMATICS 

Mathematics II . Three hours a week for one quarter. Three quarter 
hours credit. Prerequisite: Two years of high school mathematics, 
including at least one year in algebra. 

A review of some elementary algebra, including fundamental oper- 
ations, theory of numbers, equations, factoring, fractions, and systems 
of equations. Special emphasis is placed on the analysis and solution 
of statement problems. 

Mathematics 12. Three hours a week for one quarter. Three quarter 
hours credit. Prerequisite: Mathematics 11. 

A continuation of algebra including exponents and radicals, quad- 
ratic equations, systems of quadratic equations, the binomial theorem, 
progressions, and logarithms. Again, special emphasis is placed upon 
the solution of statement problems. 

Mathematics 73. Three hours a week for one quarter. Three quartet- 
hours credit. Prerequisite: Mathematics. 12 

A course in plane trigonometry, this course coxers the solution of 
right and general triangles, the general solutions of trigonometric 
equations, identities, and polar coordinates. 

Mathematics 16. College Algebra. Five hours a week for one quarter. 
Prerequisite: Two years of High School Algebra or Mathematics 11. 

A course in advanced algebra designed especially for mathematics or 
science majors. This course begins with a reyiew of theory of numbers, 
factoring, exponents and radicals, linear and quadratic equations, and 
includes a study of progressions, the binomial theorem, and theory of 
equations. 

Mathematics 17. Trigonometry. Five hours a week for one quarter. 
Prerequisite: Mathematics 16. 



44 \K\1M KONG JUNIOR ( OLLEGE 



This course begins with a review of logarithms and covers the sola- 
t ion of right triangles, the general solutions o\ trigonometric equations 

the solution of genera] triangles, identities, and polar coordinates. 

Mathematics 18. Analytic Geometry. Five hours a week for one 
quarter. Prerequisite: Mathematics 17. 

This course includes the analytic geometry of point, line and circle, 
conic sections, transformation of coordinates, polar and rectangular 
graphs, and parametric equations. 

Mathematics 21. Differential Calculus. Five hours a week for one 
quarter. Prerequisite: Mathematics 18. 

Theory of differentiation, with applications to tangents; maxima 
and minima; rates; curvature; velocity and acceleration; approxi- 
mations; and Newton's method. 

Mathematics 22. Interval Calculus. Five hours a week for one quarter. 
Prerequisite: Mathematics 21. 

Formulas and methods of integration; single integrations applied to 
areas and lengths; volumes and surfaces of revolution; centroids and 
moments of inertia; pressure and work. 

Mathematics 23. Differential and Integral Calculus. Five hours a week 

for one quarter. Prerequisite: Mathematics 22. 

The law of the mean and indeterminate forms; series, with appli- 
cations; partial and total derivatives, with applications; essentials of 
solid analytic geometrv; multiple integration, applied to areas, 
volumes, centroids and moments of inertia. 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

P. /:. 1 1M. Conditioning Course for Men. Three hours a week for one 
quarter. One quarter hour credit. Fall quarter. 

Consists of Calisthenics; stunts and tumbling; lifts and carries; 
roadwork, dual combat ives; and simple games. 

P. E. //If . Same Course for Women. Fall quarter. 

P. E. 12M. Team Sports for Men. Three hours a week for one quarter. 
One quarter hour credit. Winter quarter. 

Consists of elementary basketball, soccer, or speedball. 
P. /:. I2W Same Course for Women. Winter quarter. 



( 01 KM HI m RIPTIONS 45 



P / /v\l Elementary Swimming for Men. Four hours a week for 
one quarter. Two quarter hours credit. Spring quarter. 

P. /:. /)H'. Same Course for Women. Spring quarter. 

P. /:. 2/A1. Elemental} Tennis far Wen. Three hours a week tor one 
quarter. One quarter hour credit. Fall quarter. 

P. E. 211V. Same Course for Women. Fall quarter. 

P. E. 22. Elementary Boxing for Men. Four hours a week for one 
quarter. Two quarter hours credit. Elective. 

P. E. 23- Senior Life Saving and Instructors Course in Swimming. Five 
hours a week for one quarter. Two quarter hours credit. 

P. E. 24. Boxing for Teachers. Five hours a week for one quarter. 
Two quarter hours credit. 

P. E. 25. Eolk Rhythms. Mixed. Four hours a week for one quarter. 
Two quarter hours credit. 

P. E. 26. Modern Dance. Four hours a week for one quarter. Two 
quarter hours credit. Elective. 

P. E. 27. Tap Dance. Four hours a week for one quarter. Two 
quarter hours credit. Elective. 

P. E. 28. Adult Recreative Sports. Mixed. Three hours a week for 
one quarter. One quarter hour credit. 

Consists of passive, semi-active, and active games and sports which 
have carry-over value for later life. 

P. E. 29. Eolk Rhythms for Teachers. Five hours a week for one 
quarter. Two quarter hours credit. 

PHYSICS 

Physics 11. Freshman Physics. Three hours lecture and two hours 
laboratorv a wxek for one quarter. Four quarter hours credit. Labora- 
tory fee, $2.50. 

An elementary study of the fundamentals of Mechanics. Special 
emphasis will be placed on the solution of problems. 



46 ARMSTRONG JUNIOR COLLEGE 



Physics 12. Freshman Physics. Three hours lecture and two hours 
laboratory a week for one quarter. Four quarter hours credit. Pre- 
requisite: Physics 11 Laboratory fee, $2.50. 

An Introductory course in the study of electricity with special 
emphasis placed upon practical application and solution of problems. 

Physics 1}. Freshman Physics. Three hours lecture and two hours 
laboratory a week for one quarter. Four quarter hours credit. Pre- 
requisite: Physics 12. Laboratory fee, $2.50. 

An introductory course in that part of physics dealing with the 
fundamental laws of heat, light, and sound. 

Physics 21. General Physics. Mechanics. Fi\e hours lecture and 
three hours laboratory a week for one quarter. Six hours credit. Pre- 
requisite: Mathematics 18 and high school physics or Physics 11, 12, 
and 13. Laboratory fee, $2.50. 

A course dealing with the fundamental laws of mechanics designed 
especially for the engineering or science major. The solution of a 
large number of problems will be required. 

Physics 22. General Physics. Electricity and Magnetism. Five hours 
lecture and three hours laboratory for one quarter. Six quarter hours 
credit. Prerequisite: Mathematics 21 and Physics 21. Laboratory fee, 
$2.50. 

Electricity and related phenomena are taught in this course as a 
part of the basic General Physics course which includes Physics 21, 
22, and 23- The solution of a large number of problems will be re- 
quired, and the course includes application of the elements of dif- 
ferential calculus. 

Physics 23. General Physics. Heat, Sound, and Light. Fiye hours 
lecture and three hours laboratory for one quarter. Six quarter hours 
credit. Prerequisites: Mathematics 22 and Physics 22. Laboratory 
fee, $2.50. 

Heat, Sound, Light, and atomic physics are taught in this course as 
a part of the basic General Physics course. The solution of a large 
number of problems with application of differential and integral 
calculus are required. 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 

Political Science 12. Theories of Political Science and Application of these 
Theories. Five hours a week for one quarter. Five quarter hours credit. 



( OURS! HI m RIPTIONS 47 



\ stud) is ma !c oi the theor) >»ik! practice of govcrnmcni and politics 
in the United States, Great Britian, France, Switzerland, Russia, and 
the pre-war Fascist nations. In addition, the workings oi the United 
Nations Organization is observed Each student concentrates on some 
aspect of the course that particularl) interests him, and reports his 
findings to the class 

Political Science />. Government in the United States. Five hours a 
week for one quarter. Five quarter hours credit. 

A study is made of national, state, and local government in our 
country in actual practice. 

PSYCHOLOGY 

Psycbolog) 21. Introductory Psychology. Five hours a week for one 
quarter. 

An introductory course in psychology, including discussions of 
learning, memory, behavior, psycho-biological relationships, morale, 
and motivation. 

Psychology 22. Social Psychology . Five hours a week for one quarter. 
Prerequisite: Psychology 21. 

This course is an introduction to the psychology of groups. An 
analysis is made of the physiological and socio-cultural motivation of 
the individual from infancy to adulthood from the standpoint oi his 
group relationships. Special attention is given to a study of leadership, 
the development of radical and conservative qualities, propaganda, 
war, fascism, communism, delinquency and public opinion. 

Psychology 23. Child Psychology. Five hours a week for one quarter. 
Prerequisite: Psychology 21. 

A study of the developmental factors operating in a child's experience 
that make for, or interfere with, effective expression of his capacities 
and efficient adjustment to life situations. 

Psychology 24. Educational Psychology. Five hours a week for one 
quarter. 

A study of psychological theories of learning and of goals in learning 
as they are represented in various teaching methods used in schools, 
family life and in social changes. 



48 ARMSTRONG JUNIOR COLLEGE 



SOCIOLOGY 

Sociology 21. Marriage and the Family. Five hours a week for one 
quarter. 

A study of family backgrounds, preparation for marriage, marriage 
inter-action and family administration, family economics, problems of 
parenthood, family disorganization. A study of the family in the 
post-war period and present trends in familv life is included. 

SCHOOL OF NURSING 

Armstrong Junior College offers the following nurses' courses in 
cooperation with the Warren A. Candler Hospital School oi Nursing: 

Anatomy In. Two lecture or recitation periods and one three-hour 
laboratory period. The course runs through two quarters, or may be 
conducted in one quarter. Fee, $2.50 each quarter. 

This course is conducted concurrently with the course in phvsiologv, 
thus integrating the subject matter. The course includes both gross 
and microscopical anatomy. Lectures, demonstrations and some 
dissection. 

Physiology In. This course is conducted concurrently with the course 
in anatomy. In the integration of the two courses, a basic under- 
standing of the functions of the normal human body is presented so as 
to enable the student better to understand health, nutrition, and the 
pathological changes due to disease. The blood group of each student 
is ascertained and recorded. The methods of instruction are the same 
as in anatomy. 

Microbiology' In. Two lecture or recitation periods and one three- 
hour laboratory period. Fee, $2.00. 

The title "microbiology" is used because it is that branch of biology 
that deals with plant and animal forms, while bacteriology includes 
only the micro-organisms of vegetable origin. The characteristics 
and activities of micro-organisms and their relation to health and 
disease are studied; also the sources, modes, and prevention of in- 
fection and isolation; disinfection and asepsis; tissue changes in the 
healing process, infections and neoplasms. Explorations of scientists 
in the held of microbiology and new discoveries applicable to health 
conservation are noted. Lectures, recitations, demonstrations and 
laboratory work. 

Chemistry Dn. Three lecture or recitation periods and one three-hour 
laboratory period. Fee, $2.50. 



COURS1 Dl m RIPTIONS 49 



The purpose of this course is to acquaim students with the prin< iples 
oi inorganic, organic and physiological chemistr) with special appli- 
cations to nursing practice. General composition of blood and urine 
is studied; the students volunteering to eal certain diets which show 
relationship of utilization of foods, and kidne) function through 
urinalysis. 

Sociology l>i. This course considers (1) the principles of sociology; 
(2) the nurse as a citizen of the community and as a professional 

worker; (3) the importance oi the hospital among the social agencies 

in the community; (4) the patient in the hospital coming from the 
family and returning to the family. Three hours. 

Home Economics 2>i. Nutrition and Food Preparation, three hours. 
Fee, $4.00. 

The fundamental principles of nutrition and food preparation are 
considered. The nutrition requirements of children and of adults are 
compared. Special attention is given to the nutrition requirements of 
childhood and pregnancy. 

Psychology In. Three hours. This course is an introduction to the 
Study of human behavior with emphasis on the underlying principles 
of mental adjustments. The importance of the nurse's own personality 
is stressed. 

English In. Three hours. A basic course in the fundamentals of 
reading, writing, and speaking English. 

EVENING COLLEGE 

(Description of courses under separate cover will be furnished 
upon request) 

Courses appearing on students' transcripts numbered above 100 are 
the same as corresponding courses in the last two digits under "Course 
Descriptions." 

Art 22. - Painting with Water Colors and Pastels. 1J/2 quarter 
hours credit. 

Commerce 151-152 - Typewriting. 1^ quarter hours credit. 

Commerce 161-162 - Gregg Shorthand. 3 quarter hours credit. 

Commerce 171-172 - Comptometer. 1J^ quarter hours credit. 

Commerce 182 - Elementary Accounting. 3 quarter hours credit. 



50 ARMSTRONG JUNIOR COLLEGE 



Auditing Principles and Procedure. 3 quarter hours 
credit. 

Comment 18 ( i OSt Accounting. 3 quarter hours credit. 

Jish 111 Freshman English. S quarter hours credit. 

/ nglish 112 Freshman Englisli. 5 quarter hours credit. 

English 124 Public Speaking. 1J/2 quarter hours credit. 

Creative Handicraft. \]/o quarter hours credit. 

History 101 A History oi Western Civilization from the Beginning 
to the Reformation. 5 quarter hours credit. 

Humanities 102 - 200 Years of Music. 2 quarter hours credit. 

Mathematics 101 Freshman Mathematics. 5 quarter hours credit. 

Mathematics 10} Trigonometry. 5 quarter hours credit. 

Mathematics 99 - A Review Course. 3 quarter hours credit. 

Nat -i gat ion - Practical Celestial Navigation and Piloting. 2 quarter 
hours credit. 

Psychology 1M - Introductory Psychology. 5 quarter hours credit. 

Spanish 101 - Elementarv Spanish. 5 quarter hours credit. 

The above courses were offered in Evening School sessions during 
1946-47. 



OFFICERS OF \LIM\I ASSOCIATION 

Mr. John Iyri President 

Mr William Lloyd Via President 

Mi^s Margari i V] kssi Secretary 

M iss LoUISl KAUFMANM Treasurer 

GRADUATES OF 1946 

Associate In Liberal Arts 



Ruth Vera Baggs 
Catherine Delannoy Bliss 
Evelyn Bell Brown 
Emilv Bancroft Buckncr 
Betty Velma Burnsidc 
Marjorie Lee Chapman 
Margaret Hutchcson Claghorn 
Monique de Chezelle Davis 
Marion Collins DeFrank 
Gladys Elizabeth Denny 
Marguerite Emmalyn Downing 
Barbara Jean Gay 
Mary Hutcheson Gilchrist 
Jeannette Estelle Glynn 
Ava Dolores Gross 
Annie Nelle Hewett 
Margaret Streeter Holt 
Helen Doris Hornstein 
Maxine Kapner 



Edria Knapp Kectcr 
Henrietta kicklightcr 
Edith Moore Kuhlke 
Everett Spurgeon Lee 
Elizabeth Gene Maguirc 
BctS) C Jane Meadow S 
Dorothy Sugdcn Mather 
Martha Jane Middlebrooks 
Ruth Annette Mull is 
Rose Delores Parrott 
Gloria Roffman 
\"irginia Lee Schaupp 
Elsie Wayne Smith 
Joyce Elizabeth Smith 
Janet Teresa Spillane 
I. Joseph Switz 
Elizabeth Florence Waters 
Anne Virginia Wernicke 
Julia Lena Yarley 



Associate In Home Economics 



Margaret Jean Browne 
Marv Lvlete Crawford 
Gwendolyn Elizabeth Dupice 



Dorothy June Johnson 
Marv Elizabeth Nielsen 



PERMANENT DEANS LIST OF 
DISTINGUISHED STUDENTS 



Graduates 



A" At 



'era^e 



Summa Cum LauJe 
Everett S. Lee 
Elizabeth Waters 



Non-Graduates 

"A" Average 

Edna Ann Hutchins 
Mary Ellen Montgomerv 
Harvey Morgan 



52 



ARMSTRONG JUNIOR COLLEGE 



GRADUATES 

" B'' Average 

Marjorie Chapman 
Marion DeFrank 
Emmalyn Downing 
Gwendolyn Duprec 
Edria K. Kceter 
Henrietta Kicklighter 
Gloria Roffman 
Rose Roffman 
Virginia Schaupp 
I. Joseph Switz 
Elsie Smith 
Janet Spillane 



NON-GRADUATES 



B" A 



leray 



Donald Austin 
Miriam Bailey 
Beverly Beacham 

Mane Bright 
Betty Buntvn 
Grace Capetanakis 
Barbara Cowan 
Lorraine Crovatt 
Bettv Anne Freeman 
Frances Haile 
Faye Hancock 
Ruth Kenline 
Elsie Lawing 
Dorothy Linton 
Leslie Snead 
Helene Ungar 
Susanne Yaughndorf 
Davant Williams 
Ann Williams 
Charles Williamson 



STUDENT BODY 



SOPHOMORES 



Antonopolo, Georgia 
Armstrong, Gloria 
Austin, Donald 
Bagwell, Charles 
Bailey, Miriam 
Barker, Lynn 
Barnes, Mary Ann 
Beacham, Beverly 
Binns, William 
Birnbaum, Harriet 
Blair, Elsie Marion 
Blake, Robert 
Branch, Irene 
Brewer, Elizabeth 
Bright, Marie 
Brown, Howard B. 
Brown, Jane 
Brunner, William 
Byington, Betsy 
Byers, Margaret 
Capetanakis, Grace 
("lark, Grace 
Clark, Juanita 
Collier, Martha 
Colson, Mary 
Cook, Pattie 
Cordrav, Bobbijane 
Cowan, Barbara 
Cox, Barbara 



Cox, Sue 
Cranman, Mary 
Crovatt, Lorraine 
Curlin, Celeste 
DeLoach, Daniel 
DeVere, Helen 
Dickev, Sara 
Doerner, George 
DuBois, John 
DuPont, Mary Ann 
Durrence, Joanne 
Egan, Michael 
Exley, Mallette 
Fawcett, Sara 
FitzSimons, Theodore 
Flanders, Beverly 
Foard, Helen 
Forman, Bettv 
Foster, Ruth 
Freeman, Bettv Ann 
Gaddv, Carleen 
Gaudry, Leolene 
Goldberg, Harold 
Gracen, Lillian 
Greene, Harold 
Griner, Benjamin 
Hamilton, Phillips 
Hancock, Fave 
Harmon, Douglas 



STUDENT DIREC TORY 



53 



SOPHOMO&l S 



Harris, Cccile 

Haslam, Nelson 
Hogan, Ruth 
Hughes, How ard 
Hutchins, Edna Ann 
H\ ones, Natalie 
Isle) , George 
Kearnej , Arthur 
Kesslcr, Fred 
Kessler, Wiley 

kilrm , Elizabeth 
Lair J, Allan 
Law ing, Elsie 
Linton, Dorothy 
Little, Wilbert 
Lucas, Clarence 
Lynn, Cecil 
Lyons, John 
McGai \ c\ , Warren 
Mai lory, James 
Mallory, Lois 
Malphrus, Florrie 
Mamalakis, Chrys 
Marks, Dixie 
Mitchum, Carolyn 
Montague, Mary 
Montgomery, Mary Ellen 
Moore, Alan 
Moore, Bette 
Moore, Lida 
Munden, Billie Sue 
Murphv, Carolyn 
Nease, Leila Ann 
Orsini, Marino 
Porterfield, Annette 
Pratt, Joan 



Prcndcrg.ist, Mai \ 
Quattlebaum, Helen 

RatJifie, James 

Katnci , Bernard 

Raucrs, Mar \ 
Redmond, Robert 
Ryan, Angela 
Saseen, Barbara 
Sec, Jo\ i c 
Sigman, Fred 
Simon, Nick 
Smith, Fred 
Smith, Martha 
Smith, May Ann 
Snead, Leslie 
Sparkman, Charlie 
Stevens, Leita 
Stokes, Thomas 
Sullivan, Ruth 
Tarver, William 
Theus, Charlton 
Thompson, Eugene 
Toshach, Sally 
Ungar, Helenc 
Upchurch, George 
Vaughndorf, Susannc 
Walker, Betty 
Walker, Marguerite 
Walsh, Betty 
Wheeler, Jane 
Williams, Millard 
Williamson, Charles 
Williamson, Norman 
Wilson, Eugene 
Wood, James 
Woodward, Anne 



Freshmen 



Abbott, Laurie 
Adams, John 
Adams, Martha 
Aimar, Thomas 
Akins, John 
Alfieris, Costa 
Allen, Lawrence 
Altman, Frances 
Anchors, John 
Anderson, Charles 
Anderson, Waldo 
Andrews, Helen 
Armstrong, Claude 
Arnsdorff, Harold 
Asselanis, Stamatios 
Audesey, Joseph 



Bacot, Jules 
Bagwell, Eugene 
Bailev, Charlotte 
Baker, Allic 
Banks, Louie 
Barnes, Eugene 
Baron, Edwin 
Barragan, Patricia 
Beall, Allen 
Beck, William 
Beckwith, Betty 
Becton, Charles 
Bell, William 
Bergman, Jackson 
Berry, Mercer 
Berry, Thomas 



54 



ARMSTRONG JUNIOR COLLEGE 



F&ESHM1 N 



Bud, William 
Black, Hcnn 
Blackburn, Louise 
Bla< kburn, Ncllu \ n 
B1<X kcr, Norma Faye 
Blumberg, Helen 
Booker, Ann 
Bourne, Leon 
Brabham, Mo\ c 
Brannen, George 
Brew ton, James 
Brigham, Charles 
Brown, George 
Brown, Harriet 
Brown, Henry 
Brown, Hugh 
Brown, Jack 
Brown, Samuel 
Browne, Leonora 
Burch, Barbara 
Burgin, Arnold 
Burt, Robert 
Butler, William 
Buttimer, John 
Cannon, Anne 
Caphton, Warren 
Carpenter, Evelyn 
Carroll, William 
Carter, Lourdine 
Carter, Raymond 
Cartlidge, George 
Cason, Robert 
Chanel. t, Arthur 
Chastain, Jesse 
Chenggis, Andrew 
Clanton, Charles 
Clark, William 
Clements, Joseph 
Cobb, Lucious 
Cohen, Charlton 
Coleman, Frank 
Colley, William 
Collins, Charles 
Colquitt, Alfred 
Conwa) , Harvey 
Cook, Marian 
Coolev, Irwin 
Cooper, Bernice 
Corcoran, Frederick 
Cordell, Jcrr\ 
Corey, Joan 
Corle) , Harmon 
Co wart, Gordon 
Cox, William 
Crane, William 
Credle, Kenneth 



Crews, Arch 
Cubbcdgc, Robert 
Damcl, Emon 
Daugherty, Sidney 
Davis, Elizabeth 
I )a\ is, Donald 
Davis, Lawrence 
Dc Lett re, Dewc\ 
DeMars, Jean 
DeMars, John 
DcVere, Dorothy 
DeVere, George 
DeWayne, Buckleigh 
Dickey, Grady 
Dimmick, Robert 
Dismukes, James 
Dodd, Harrv 
Downs, John 
Dunn, Laurence 
Dupree, Gleaton 
Durden, Rose Marv 
Durkin, Francis 
Durrence, Jack 
Edwards, Adelia 
Elkins, Kertis 
Ellis, James 
Etherton, Phyllis 
Evans, Dexter 
Evans, Reginald 
Fahev, Thomas 
Falk,' Richard 
Farrior, William 
Ferguson, Reginald 
Filly aw, Lawrence 
Finocchiaro, Frank 
Fogarty, John 
Fogarty, Moira 
Fogarty, Thomas 
Fonts, Anthonv 
Fountain, Marv 
Frazier, Carolvn 
Fretwell, Anne 
Fritts, David 
Fulton, Mary 
Futrell, Hugh 
Gaines, Thomas 
Galin, Alvin 
Garis, (Catherine 
Gibbs, Herman 
Gilbert, Elizabeth 
Giles, Phyllis 
Gnann, Marv Elizabeth 
Gordon, Ravmond 
Graham, Bettv 
Gray, Francis 
Griffin, William 



STUD! VI DIRE( TORY 



5S 



Fri bhm) 



Groov a . Robert 

Haag, Baron 
Haddock, John 
Hale, Charlotte 
Hall. Colleen 
Hamle) , Robert 
Hardee, James 

Harmon, Carl 
Harmon, Robert 
Harncv, William 
Harp. Fred 
Harris, Jack 
Harrison, Carter 
Harty, Anthony 
Ha) man, Marguerite 
Hecker, Robert 
Heller, Haskell 
Heller, Rupert 
Helmey, Edgar 
Henderson, Kathleen 
Hendrix, John 
Hendrix, Paulette 
Hcrndon, Percy 
Hickox, Juanita 
Hindman, Benjamin 
Hodges, Cheatham 
Hodges, Eldred 
Hodgkins, Willis 
Holland, Robert 
Hoi ley, Ernest 
Hollingsworth, Joseph 
Holmen, Gustav 
Holton, William 
Hopkins, Emil 
Horton, Homer 
Horton, William 
Howkins, John 
Hvrne, George 
Hvrne, John 
Inhulsen, Bernard 
Jarrett, Elizabeth 
Jarrott, George 
Johnson, Cecil 
Johnson, Dorothy Mae 
Johnson, Howard 
Jones, Bert 
Jones, Georgette 
Jones, William 
Joselove, Joseph 
Joselove, Riette 
Kahn, Baldwin 
Kandel, Phillippa 
Kavanaugh, Mary Ann 
Keever, Linney 
Ketchum, Nelson 
Kicklighter, Grady 



Kile) , |.u k 
Kimberl) , James 
Kite hens, M.k k 
Kluber, Harold 

Knight, Stuart 
Knight, Troj 
Kraft, Ri>^ M i 
Kravitch, S IK 
Kuhlke, Bett) 
Lain, Annabel 
Laird, Donald 
L.urJ, Marguerite 
Laird, Matilda 
Laird, T. A. 
Lamas, Ted 
Lanier, Col an 
Lawson, Marjone 
Leaf, Hunter 
Leaf, Nancv 
Lee, Ed\\ aid 
Leonard, Elizabeth 
Lester, Robert 
Lewis, John 
Lilley, Charles 
Livingston, Harrv 
Logan, Joseph 
Lord, Caroline 
Lord, Iverson 
Love, Carroll 
Love, Yerdie 
Lowenkopf, Melvin 
Lynn, James 
Lyons, Charles 
Maclaunn, Robert 
McClure, Lee 
McCullough, Roy 
McDonald, Richard 
McDuffie, Robert 
McGhee, Jerry 
McGinty, John 
McGraw, George 
McKnight, Eugene 
McMillan, Jane 
McTeer, Joseph 
Mackey, Herbert 
Mallory, Paul 
Matthews, Ashb\ 
Maxwell, Josephine 
Mayer, Anne 
Meddin, Roger 
Melson, Robert 
Mikelljohn 
Miles, Frank 
Miller, Betty Anne 
Miller, Sara Anne 
Mingledorff, Arthur 



56 



ARMSTRONG JUNIOR COLLEGE 



Fresh nun 



Minis, Carolyn 
M ixOO, Cameron 
Munahan, William 
Mooncv, Thomas 
Morel, Jacob 
Morel, Mai | 
Morns, Clinton 
Murphy, Henry- 
Nathan, Irving 
Newman, John 
Newton, Benjamin 
Nichols, Stellgis 
Nichols, Van Nolan 
Nicholson, William 
Nightingale, Rufus 
Nix, Lillie Mae 
Nodvin, Marvin 
Nowell, Vernon 
Nowell, Walter 
Nutting, Sidney 
O'Connor, Daniel 
O'Donovan, John 
Olson, John 
Owens, Jimmie 
Oxenheld, Jean 
Pahno, Arthur 
Pahno, Leon 
Paine, Hampton 
Parrish, Jesse 
Patterson, Joseph 
Patterson, Mary 
Paulsen, Jacob 
Pearson, Thomas 
Perkins, Dennis 
Persse, Jefferson 
Peters, Hazel Mae 
Pctris, Paul 
Pierce, Robert 
Pitts, Elizabeth 
Pitts, Paul 
Porter, Robert 
Price, William 
Prince, Dewey 
Rahn, Henrv 
Ratcliffe, William 
Reed, William 
Reeves, George 
Register, Meta Price 
Rchm, Raymond 
Rcisman, Louis 
Rice, Janice 
Richard, John 
Richard, Robert 
Richards, Vernon 
Richards, Wallace 
Rizza, Frank 



Roane, Curtis 
Roberts, Emorv 
Robertson, Clinton 
Robinson, John 
Robinson, Robert 
Rockwell, Charles 
Rogers, James 
Rogers, Jesse 
Rosenthal, Morris 
Royce, Carolyn 
Rudofsky, Louise 
Ryan, Jo 
Ryan, Mary 
Ryder, Donald 
Saseen, Joseph 
Saxon, Martha 
Schroder, Oliver 
Scott, Franklin 
Seawright, Carolyn 
Seawright, Patricia 
Seckinger, Barbara 
Silver, Julian 
Simms, Evelyn 
Sims, Archibald 
Sineath, Fred 
Sitler, William 
Slotin, Harry 
Small, Thomas 
Smith, Corry 
Smith, Kulman 
Smith, Robert 
Smith, William 
Snipes, Harrv 
Solana, Joseph 
Solomons, Joseph 
Sowell, Robert 
Sparkman, John 
Speir, Henry- 
Stevens, James 
Stewart, Charles 
Stewart, John 
Strachan, Mary 
Street, Wayne 
Strickland, Paul 
Strickland, Sidney 
Strickland, William 
Ta\ lor, Louise 
Teuton, James 
Thomas, Reppard 
Thorpe, Benjamin 
Thorpe, Edwin 
Tienckcn, William 
Tootle, James 
Tranberg, Carl 
Turner, DeLamar 
Turner, Hubert 



STl Dl NT HIKK TORY 



57 



FRl sum i N 



Yarn. Ronald 

Veale, James 
Wade, Th< 
Walker. Herchel 
Wall, William 
Wallace, William 
Waller. Edgar 
Walsh, Verna 
Waters, Edscl 
Waters, Elizabeth 
Watts, William 
W a\ . Robert 
Weathers, Jean 
Webster, Charles 
Whitener, Nanc) 



Williams, Barbara 

Williams, James 
W ilson, Paul 
W ilson, Robert 
Winn, William 
W ise, Pauline 
Wolson, Freddie 
W oods, Wilbur 
Worrell, William 
W) man, Bern 
Yarber, William 
Yates, James 
Zalkow, Leon 
Zilch, Marian 



WARREN A. CANDLER NURSES 



Willie Mae Arnsdorf 
Aubrea Barrett 
Barbara Ann Burns 
Barbara Davis 
Betty Jean Dougherty 
Mclba Louise Flood 
Bobbie Allie Herring 
Edna Laveau Jones 
Anne Kicklighter 
\ lrginia Jane Little 
Margaret McKenzie 



Martha Susan Monk 
Yilma Neal 
Vera Newman 
Denta Faye Purcell 
Shirley Scruggs 
Geraldine Skipper 
Myrtle Shelnutt 
Eunice Solomons 
Daisy Belle Wilkerson 
Lucy Angela Woods 



EVENING SCHOOL STUDENTS 



Ambrose, Merritt 
Bacon, Dorsett 
Bagwell, Eugene 
Bailey, Charlotte 
Baker, Dorothy 
Beaujean, John 
Becton, Joseph 
Bell, Orell 
Brabham, Move 
Brabham, Mrs. Move 
Brown, Edith 
Brown, James 
Bryant, Ruth 
Buckshaw, Elizabeth 
Callendar, Francis 
Cater, Fletcher 
Chandler, Henry 
Christian, John, Jr. 
Christian, Mrs. John, Jr. 
Collins, Mrs. \V. Arthur 
Coolidge, Harold B. 
Cooper, Jacob. 



Copeland, Jean H. 
Cox, Walter M., Jr. 
Coyle, Betty 
Cummins, Mrs. L. Ross 
Daniels, Thomas, Jr. 
Deegan, Anthony 
Diamond, Sophie 
Dinerman, Pauline 
Doherty, Jane 
Donnan, Sarah 
Duke, Daniel F, Jr. 
Durrence, Elizabeth 
Dutton, Mrs. George 
Edenfield, William 
Elkan, Mabel 
Ellis, Fred 
Erickson, T. W. 
Ernst, H. Andrew, Jr. 
Ethercdge, Henry 
Floyd, Sarah 
Flythe, Thomas W". 
Fogarty, Richard 



ss 



ARMSTRONG JUNIOR COLLEGE 



Evening School Students 



Folgcr, Bernard 
Folgcr, John 
Foran, Juanitu 
Foss, Henrietta 
Fox, Bett) Lou 
Frazier, Lonniejanc 
Fntts, Jean Elizabeth 
Fulton, Day id 
Garfield, Ida 
Gcrber, Marx 
Gignilliat, Elizabeth K. 
Gill i kin, Sidney 
Gillis, Vera 
Gnann, Andrew 
Goette, Catherine 
Gresham, Marion 
Griffin, Juanita 
Groover, Charles 
Gruber, Doris 
Gruber, William 
Hagins, Frances 
Haile, George. Jr. 
Harlev, Dorothy 
Haynsworth, Mrs. E. H. 
Heath, Myrtice 
Henry, \\ 'igg 
Hickcy, Mary 
Hicks, Clyde C, Jr. 
Hodge, David 
Hogan, Daniel 
Hood, John, Jr. 
Hopkins. William, Jr. 
Hostetter, Elizabeth 
Jernigan, John 
Johnson, Alice 
Jones, Anne 
Jones, Georgette 
King, Basil 
Kreutter, H. R. 
Lang, Frank 
Lanier, Lois Mae 
Law ton, Spencer 
Lilis, E. A. 
McCarthy, June 
McClellan, Carolyn 
McCroan, T. A. 
McGinlcv, Joseph 
McLeskv. W.J. 
Madden, Dorothy 
Martin, Bruce 
Martin, Frank 
Mathews, Frank .Jr. 
Mathews, James 
Maulden, Barquell 
Maxwell. Mattie 
Meeks. Mrs W. T. 



Mendel, Dorothy 

Miles, Frank 

Miscally, Louise 

Mock, William 

Morgan. Nita 

M«>- ton, Frances 

Murphy, Henrv 

Nease, Ann 

Nease, Melville 

Nichols, LaYerne 

ODrezin, David 

O'Neal, Charles 

Paderewskv, Helen 

Parker, James, Jr. 

Parker. Robert, Jr. 

Patterson, Joseph 

Patrick, Lucile 

Persse, Jefferson D. 

Peth, David 

Pape, Henrv 

Pincknev, Catherine 

Porter, Robert 

Powers, Walter, Jr. 

Price, Marv 

Prosser. Arthur, Jr. 

Quattlebaum, Helen 

Quattlebaum, Mrs. Julian K. 

Rabhan, Leonard 

Ralston, John. Jr. 

Rianhard, Edell 

Richardson, Beulah 

Rizza. Robert 

Roberts, Louis 

Rockwell, Helen 

Ross, Sam 

Russell, C. R., )r. 

Sally, Hazel 

Salter, Jessie 

Schaupp, Virginia 

Schreck, Essie 

Schreck, Joseph 

Scordas, H. T. 

Scordas. Mrs. H. T. 

Scott, Joseph Franklin 

Sinclair, Dorothv 

Smith, Walter 

Southwell, Robert 



J>pi 



lane, Thomas 



Stafford, John, Jr. 
Stapleton, Walter D. 
Stephens, Dorothy 
Stephens, Jack 
Stewart, William 
Street. William 
Strozier, Bettv 
Swartz, Theda 



STl HI \l HIKK IOKV 



59 



I \ i \i 



& HOOl Si mi \ is 



Talli . James 
r.i\ toi . i o 
Thomas, Miriam 
Thompson, Henry 
l oocle, Betrj 

Tull.s. Lillian 

Turner, Gloria 

Turner, Morton, Jr. 
Usher, Rose 
Vaden, Maude 
Waite, George 
Warren, Elizabeth 
W ay, Laura 



\\ heeloi , Elinor 

\\ hite, John, Ji 

\\ k iters, Charles 

\\ illiams, Ernestine 

\\ illiams, Mrs R. P. 

\\ inter, Albert Charles 

W into , Donald 

W isiat kas, Justian 

W olfe, Mrs. John Saxton 

Worrill, Cornelia 

Wright, John 

Zahlcr, Jessie 



ARMSTRONG JUNIOR 
COLLEGE 

Municipal College of Savannah, Georgia 



BULLETIN 




For Reference 

Not to be taken from this room 



1948 - 1949 



SUMMER I ALL WINTER SPRING 



Bulletin of 



Armstrong Junior College 



The Municipal College 
of Savannah, Georgia 




18340 



Membership in 

American Association of Junior Colli 
Southern Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools 
.Wociation of Georgia Coll< s 



Volume XIII 



Number 1 



i 



ARMSTRONG COLLEGE 

LIBRARY 



"Education is a companion which no misfortune 
can depress — no crime destroy — no enemy alienatt 
no despotism enslave. At home, a friend; abroad, 
an introduction; in solitude, a solace; and in 
society, an ornament." 



ARMSTRONG JUNIOR COLLEGE 
ACADEMIC CALENDAR 

[948- 1949 

SUMMER QUAR I IK 

Registration June H 

plasses begin, Firsl Session June 14 

Holiday July 5 

Examinations July 23 

Classes begin, Second S< ssion July 26 

Kxaminations August 31 

FALL QUARTER 

Testing Program for Prospective Freshmen September 2, 3 

Individual Counseling September 13-17 

Upper Classmen Registration September 20 

Freshmen Registration September 21 

Classes begin September 22 

Mid-Term Reports Due November 5 

Thanksgiving Holidays November 25-28 

Registration for Winter Quarter December 8-10 

Examinations December 15-17 

Homecoming December 20 

Christmas Holidays December 18 — January 2 

WINTER QUARTER 

Registration of New Students ^December 31 

Classes begin January 3 

Mid-Term Reports Due February 11 

Registration for Spring Quarter March 7-9 

Examinations March 14-Hi 

SPRING QUARTER 

Registration for New Students March 18 

Classes begin March 21 

Mid-Term Reports Due April 29 

Examinations May 31 — June 2 

President's Reception June 3 

Sophomore-Alumni Luncheon __ . June 4 

Graduation Exercises June 6 



Administration 

THE COLLEGE COMMISSION 

Herschei V. Jenkins Chairman 

Wniiwi MuRPHE\ \"u c-Clidiniiaii 

Morris Bernstein John G. Kennedy, Ex Officio 

■ORDON C. CarsoNj Ex Officio Mrs. William F. Robertson 

II. Hwskll Hillyer, Ex Officio Fred L. Shearouse 
[ames P. Hon in an. Ex Officio Ormond B. Strong, Ex Officio 

Fred Wessels 
THE FACULTY 

Fori man M. Hawks, A.B.. M.S President 

Arthur M. Gignilliat, A.B., M.A Registrar 

W. Orson Beeciier, A.B., M.A Dean of Student ; 

William B. Baker, A.B., Emory University; Colleague of the Ameri- 
can Guild of Organists. 

Instructor in English and Music 

\\ . Orson Beeciier, A.B. and M.A., Emory University; M.A. Uni- 
versity of Georgia. 

Instructor in Social Sciences 

Francis M. Brannen, B.S. in Chemical Engineering, Georgia School 
of Technology; Graduate study in Ch. E., Georgia School of 
Technology. Chemical engineer, Coca-Cola Company; Consult- 
ing engineer. 

Instructor in Engineering 

\rthur M. Casper, B.S., Beloit College: Graduate study, University 
of Wisconsin. Optics dept., Central Scientific Company & Prefex 
Corporation, radar mechanic. 

Instructor in Physics and Mathematics 

Elizabeth Colson, A.B., Georgia State College for Women: Grad- 
uate study, Emory University Library School. 

Librarian 

Fretwell G. Crider, B.S. in Chemistry, University of North 
Carolina. 

Instructor in Chemistry 

Marie Lyons Crider, B.A., Vanderbilt University. 

Assistant Registrar 



4 ARMS! RONG JUNIOR COLLEGE 

William M. Dabney, A.B. and MA.. University of Virginia. 
Instructoi in History and Political Science 

A.n.m S. Allen Davis, A.B., Brenau College. 

Library Assistant 

IIarkii i G. Davis, A.B., University of North Carolina. 

Publicity 

Eleanor J. Doyle, B.S.. Immaculate College; M.A.. Catholic Uni- 
versity of America. 

Insti actor in Spanish and Latin American History 

Martha Bozeman Fax. B.A., Rockford College; M.S. and Ph.D., 
University of of Illinois. 

Instructor in Biology 

Arthur M. Gignilliat, A.B. and M.A.. University of Georgia. 

Inst rue tor in English 

Noma Lee Goodwin. A.B.. Duke University; M.A.. Duke University. 

List rue tor in English 

Joseph I. Killorin, A.B., St. Johns College 

Instructor in German and History 

Margaret Spencer Lubs. B. Mus., Converse College: A.B.. Univer- 
sity of Georgia; M.A.. Columbia University; Studied at the 
Sorbonne in Paris, France. 

Instructor in French 

George B. Miller, Jr., B.S. in A.E., Georgia School of Technology. 
Aircraft flight test officer, U. S. Navy; Aerodynamicist, Consoli- 
dated Vultee Aircraft Corporation. 

Instructor in Mathematics and Engineering 

Christine Wilson Minnix, A.B., University of Chattanooga; I I 
uate study, University of Tennessee, 

Instructor in Physical Education 

Marjorie A. Moslev. Associate in Finance and Commerce, Arm- 
strong Junior College. 

Secretary 

Hinckley Murphy, B.A.. Vanderbilt University; Graduate study 
Columbia University, University oi Georgia. 
Instructoi in English 






THK FACULTY 



Margarei Persse, Associate in Liberal Arts, Armstrong Junior 
College. 

William S. Polutzer, A.B. and MA. Emory University. 
Instructor in Biology 

|\mi> Holmes Scarborough, B.S.E.E., Emory University j Graduate 
Study, Emory University and Harvard University. Test and re- 
search engineer, General Electric Company; production engineer, 
Pan-electronics Laboratory. 

Instructor in Physics and Math math s 
Director of the Evening School 

Margaret Fortson Stephens, A.B., University of Georgia; LL.B., 
University of Georgia; M.A., University of Georgia: Certificate 
From the Sorbonne, Paris. France. 

hist rue tor in English 

Carlson R. Thomas, B.A., University of Richmond; M.A., Univer- 
sity of North Carolina; Graduate study, University of Iowa. 
Director of Savannah Playhouse 

Dorothy M. Thompson, A.B., Monmouth College; Social Work, 
Milwaukee School of Social Work; M.A., Northwestern Univer- 
sity: Certificate of Psychiatric Social Work, Western Reserve 
University. 

Instructor in Psychology and Sociology 

Carmen Torrie, B.S. in P.E., Concord College; M.S. in P.E., Uni- 
versity of Tennessee. 
Director of Athletics and Instructor in Physical Education 

Duke C. TREXLER, B.S.. Georgetown University. 

Instructor in Business Laic and Economics 

Charles B. Vail, B.S., Birmingham Southern College; M.S., Emory 
University. 

Instructor in Chemistry 

Helen C. Wolfe, B.S., Columbia University; Graduate Study, 
Teachers College, Columbia University. 

Instructor in Home Economics 

Gladys Nichols Zilch, Special Course in Typewriting and Short- 
hand; University of Michigan and University of Florida. Diploma 
from the Gregg College (Normal School) in Chicago. 
Instructor in Commerce 



History, Organization and Aims 

I ll^ I • >KN 

On May 27, 1935, the Board oi Aldermen of the City oi Savannah 
met a long-felt need 1>\ establishing .i municipally supported junior 
college. The college was housed in the magnificent heme of the late 
George F. Armstrong, the gift to the city of his widow and daughter, 
fhis former home, now the Armstrong Building, is of Italian Renais- 
sance architecture; inside and outside it is one of the most beautiful 
college buildings in tin South. 

Over the years, through private donation and through public ap- 
propriation, the campus has been enlarged until now it includes four 
additional buildings: the Lane Building, in which the library is 
housed, a gift of the late Mills B. Lane, prominent hanker: the John 
W .Hunt Memorial Building in which are located the Veterans' 
Guidance Center, the Home Economies Department, the Women's 
Lounge, and the Music Room; Herschel V. Jenkins Hall, which 
contains the auditorium, theater for the Savannah Playhouse, and 
classrooms; and Thomas Gamble Hall, site of science lecture room 
and well-equipped laboratories. 

Three of the buildings face Forsyth Park, consisting of forty a< 
the most beautiful park in the city. The other two buildings face 
Monterey Square, one of the carefully planned squares tor which 
S annah is deservedly famous. 

The Georgia Historical Society Library, to which the students have 
access, is just across Whitaker Street from the college buildings. 

The college is under the control of a commission of six members, 
appointed by the Mayor. In addition, the commission includes as 
cx-oflicio members the Mayor, the Chairman of the Chatham County 
Board of Education, the Chairman of the County Commissioners, the 
Superintendent of the Board of Education, and the President of the 
Savannah Chamber of Commerce. 

Except for the war years, enrollment has shown a steady increase 
until the present student body numbers approximately five hundred. 
As need arises, the curriculum is enlarged and modified to meet new 
demands. 

As a municipal college, Armstrong seeks to serve Savannah and 

the community by giving to the men and women who attend its 
classes an understanding" of the world in which they live and an 
appreciation of the best that has been achieved in western civilization. 
Its graduates are equipped to continue their studies in the junior 



8 ARMSTRONG JUNIOR COLLEGE 



class of .1 senior college; but for those who do not desire to pursue 
their work elsewhere, terminal work is offered. For both groups of 
students, the college attempts to provide a broad conception of the 

world and it- problems and a keen realization of the duties and re- 
sponsibilities <>f citizenship. 

Library 

On Gaston Street immediately west of Jenkins Hall i^ the college 
library, the Lane Building, which bears the name of the donor, the 
late Mills B. Lane. Two beautiful and well lighted reading rooms 
are on the main floor, the first room housing general and special 
encyclopedias, dictionaries, yearbooks and other standard reference 
works; the second, fiction and college catalogs. There is additional 
space for study on the two floors above and in the lounge on the 
ground floor. The stacks, on second floor, are open to the students: 
and the lecture room, on the top floor, is used for special classes, 
study and conferences. The library lounge, which houses all current 
periodicals, is of special interest to clubs and students who enjoy 
recreational reading and informal discussions. 

At present the library houses over 6.000 bound volumes. Recent 
emphasis has been placed on the acquisition of psychology, English, 
history and science. The library subscribes to seven newspapers, four 
of which are dailies, and over 100 magazines. There is a pamphlet 
file and collection of college catalogs, the latter being very helpful 
to veterans as well as other students. 

In addition to the resources of the college library, students are in- 
vited to use the Savannah Public Library. The main building on Bull 
Street has a union catalog listing the holdings of its branches : namely. 
The Downtown Branch on Bay Street and the Georgia Historical 
Society, which is diagonally across the street from the Armstrong 
Library. 

The library is fortunate in being the recipient of a large and out- 
standing collection of history books, a gift of the late Thomas Gamble. 
Mayor of Savannah. 

Under the supervision of a trained librarian, an assistant librarian. 
and six student assistants, the library is open each school day from 
8:30 until 5:30. 

Laboratories 

The college has completely equipped laboratories in physics, chem- 



CKXKRAL INFORMATION 



istry, biology, home economics, engineering drawing, and surveying. 
In addition, one 01 more ol the classrooms in each <>! the college 
buildings is equipped with a screen and .1 portable sound motion pic- 
ture projector. The college is building .1 permanent library ol fre- 
quently used films and obtains, on a rental basis, those films which 
are used less frequently. 

& li' »i tRSHIPS AND Loans 

The following scholarships and loans arc available for deserving 
students; application blanks may he secured by a request addressed 
to the President of Armstrong Junior College. 

1. The Arthur Lucas Scholarships, $100.00 each. 

Four or more will he available for 1948-49. These scholarships 
are provided by the income from the Arthur Lucas Scholarship 
Fund of $25,000.00. 

2. The John Helm Maclean Memorial Scholarship, $100.00. 
One will he available for 1948-49. 

• American Business Club of Savannah Scholarships, $200.00 each. 
Two will be available for 1948-49. The George E. Reid Me- 
morial Scholarship for Girls. The Joseph M. Smith Memorial 
Scholarship for Boys. 

These two scholarships are for the full two-year course at Arm- 
strong. Eligible to compete are boys and girls entering the Fresh- 
man year at College. Winners will be announced following an 
interview of all applicants by a scholarship board. Especially 
urged to apply for these scholarships are men and women who 
have shown good progress in high school and who need financial 
assistance. 

4. The Beta Sigma Phi Loan Fund, $100.00. 
One for 1948-49. 

5. Commission Scholarships, $100.00 each. 
Eight are available for 1948-49. 

These are work scholarships and students who hold them are 
expected to serve as library, laboratory, or clerical assistants. 

6. Junior Chamber of Commerce Scholarships, $100.00 each. 
Three for 1948-49. 

The Reese N. Burks Scholarship. 

The Edward H. Carmichael Scholarship. 



LO ARMSTRONG JUNIOR COLLEGE 



The Martin G. Kirschbaum Scholarship. 

7. The Pilot Club Loan Fund, $100.00. 
One for 1948-49. 

8. Savannah Gas Company Home Economics Scholarships. 
Three for 1948-49. 

The James Alfred Pearce Crisfield Scholarship. $100.00. 
The General Jeremy Francis Gilmer Scholarship. $100.00. 
The Mary Weaver McClaren Scholarship. $200.00 plus textbooks. 

9. Savannah Gas Company Engineering Scholarships. 
Two for 1948-49. Value: $100.00. 

Savannah Gas Company Scholarship to Georgia Tech, $300.00. 
Open to any male who completes three-quarters of freshman 
engineering at Armstrong Junior College. 

10. The Dan Lavender Patterson Memorial Scholarship, $100.00. 
One for 1948-49. Open to any engineering student. 

Applications for Scholarships 

Applications for scholarships or loans must be on file in the PresM 
dent's office at Armstrong Junior College by August 1, 1948. 

Detailed information may be obtained by calling 2-1197 or by 
writing to the college. 

Tuition for residents of Chatham County is $150.00 for a nine- 
months term. 

Armstrong Guidance Center 

In December. 1945. the Veterans' Guidance Center began opera] 
tion. A joint undertaking between the United States Government 
and tlu College, it employs a full-time staff of professionally trained 
personnel to help veterans with their educational, vocational, and 
personal adjustment problems. The Armstrong Guidance Center is 
one of five Federal contract guidance clinics in the State of Georgil 
and Mixes a territory including 38 counties. By the Spring f 1948 
approximately 3,000 veterans had taken advantage of this compra 
hensive testing and counseling program. The services of the guidanol 
center (which include testing of mental ability, special aptitudes, 
school achievement, interest pattern, and personality adjustment) are. 



GENERAL INFORMATION 11 

available, without expense, to all men and women who Mixed in 
the I S. Armed Forces during World Wai II. This service a also 
available without expense to any Armstrong student who is recom- 
mended In the Faculty Counseling Committee as being seriousl) 
interested in comprehensive advisement. 

Since September, 1946, the Armstrong Guidance Center, in addi- 
tion to the activities mentioned above, has carried on an extended 
program which includes testing children and serving other non- 
vcteran clients from the community-at-large on a "private" clinic 

tee basis. The Georgia State Department of Education has approved 
Armstrong as a Testing Center for the American Council on Educa- 
tion, and the Graduate Record Office in New York City has desig- 
nated the Armstrong guidance- unit as an Examination Center for 
their nation-wide testing program which includes the Graduate Record 
Examination (for admission to graduate and professional schools), 
the Professional Aptitude Test (for admission to participating mem- 
ber institutions of the American Association of Medical Colleges), 
and the Pre-Engineering Inventory. Also, personnel managers from 
local industry refer job applicants for psychological testing as a part 
of employee selection procedures. 

Children examined at the Guidance Center have been referred by 
the City-Countv Health Department. Familv Service, Department 
of Public Welfare. Juvenile Court, Jewish Educational Alliance, Be- 
thesda Home for Boys, Children's Home of Chatham Countv, Gould 
Home. Savannah Home for Girls, Episcopal Home, private physicians 
(psychiatrists and pediatricians), public and private school officials. 
A recent addition to the facilities of the Guidance Center is a w 'play 
room,'' which promises substantia] value as a diagnostic supplement 
and therapeutic aid in working with childhood adjustment problems. 

Approximately 200 non-veteran clients have been through the 
Armstrong Guidance Center at the date of this printing. The guidance 
center is fortunate in having a close working relationship with two 
psychiatrists, both of whom have their offices in the same block 
within two or three doors of the college. 

The Mental Hygiene- Society of Savannah has taken as its major 
objective the task of recruiting support for a permanent community 
psychological service that would continue and expand the services 

initiated by the veterans' clinic at Armstrong. 

The Center at present occupies quarters on the ground floor of 
the Hunt Memorial Building, with a main entrance on Bull Street. 
The following is a list of the Armstrong Staff employed in this 
service: 



12 ARMSTRONG JLXIOR COLLEGE 



L. Ross C i mmins, B.S., Vale University; Graduate Stuck. Univer- 
sity <>l Connecticut (Intern Psychologist, Norwich, Conn., State 
I lospital) . 

Din < tor <>f tin Guidant < (.< > 

William E. Hopke, A.B. and M.A.. New York St .1 1< - Teachers (al- 
lege (Albany). 

St nior Counselor 

Louise Fleming, A.B. and M.A., Ohio State University. 

Psychological Examiner and Counselor 

Frances B. Settle, A.B., University of Georgia. 

Counselor 

Sarah M. Thorpe, A.B.. University of Georgia. 

Psychological Examiner 

Dixie C. Marks, Commercial Course, Armstrong Junior College. 

Sec ret a> y 

Martha D. Gregson, Commercial Course. Armstrong Junior College. 

Secretarial Assistant and Psychometric Clerk 

Endowment Fund 

Inaugurated in 1944 with contributions from some fifty members 
of the Alumni Association, Armstrong's Endowment Fund was greatly 
increased by a gift from the Savannah Morning News. The College 
expresses sincere appreciation for these contributions. 

Board and Lodging 

There is no plan for group board and lodging. Individual make 
their own arrangements; but a list of homes seeking student boarders 
is kept in the office of the Secretary to the President. 

Out-of-town students are referred to the local Young Men's and 
Young Women's Christian Associations, whose dormitories are con- 
ceniently located to the college. Prices for room and board at these 
two organizations .ire typical of those 1 in this region. 

Employment Opportunities 

In School: A student seeking temporary or part-time work while 



GENERAL INFORMATION L3 



in attendance should register with the President, making .1 statement 
as to his experience and abilities. At the same time, .1 studenl should 
indicate the type of employment most desired. The college in this 
w.i\ ma) help the student get the type of work most helpful to him 
l( v work experience, in addition to assisting him with his current ex- 
penses. Records concerning each student and the quality of his work 
becomes .1 part of his permanent 6Ie, the information to be used in 
determining recommendations for the student in cases of permanent 
employment both before and after leaving college. 

Out of School: The college maintains a Placement Service open 
to all registrants at Armstrong Junior College. Every student wishing 
assistance in finding a position is urged to register with the Insructoi 
in Charge of Commercial Subjects. While no guarantee of employ- 
ment can be made, the placement supervisor will help the qualified 
student find suitable work. 



The Eyi \i\(. College 

To adults interested in advancing their education and information, 
Armstrong Junior College offers classes in varied subjects. Most of 
the classes carry full college credit to those students properly quali- 
fied; for others, no specific entrance qualifications other than an 
interest in learning are required. 

Persons interested should write for a separate bulletin outlining 
courses, etc. 



Adult Students 

All regular day or credit classes are open to adults who wish to 
attend as SPECIAL students. If college credit is desired, such students 
must meet the entrance requirements for regular students. Exemption 
from physical education requirements may be secured by petitioning 
the faculty. 

Student Conduct 

Armstrong students conduct themselves as ladies arid gentlemen. 
Personal honor and respect for the rights of others is our standard. 

The following is quoted from the minutes of the College Com- 
mission for the stud:nts' information: 



14 ARMSTRONG JUNIOR COLLEGE 

"Hazing in all forms is prohibited at Armstrong Junioi 
Coll( 

Drinking alcoholic beverages and gambling on college prop- 
erty is prohibited. 

Violation of these or any other regulations will subject the 
students to disciplinary action by the faculty which may 
mean tin- expulsion ^\ the offender or offenders from the 
colli g 

Organizations and groups using the name of the college in their 
social and other functions are identified with the college and become 
subject to the same high standards of conduct and of supervision 
whether on or off the campus. The reputation of Armstrong is in the 

hands of its students. 

The act of registration at Armstrong Junior College constitutes 
an agreement by the student to abide by the regulations as outlined 
in this catalog, or promulgated by the college commission, the faculty, 
and the student body. 

Commencement Exercisi - 

Commencement exercises are held once each year in June. At this 
time the degrees of "Associate in Liberal Arts." "Associate in Home 
Economics." etc., are received by those who have completed the 
requirements for graduating. Recognition is given those who win 
scholarships and those qualifying for scholastic honors. The Faculty 
and Students participate in full academic dress. 



Si udent \<ii\ it i< i > 

With .1 firm belief in the developmental function of individual or 
concerted group expression, Armstrong Junior College has made 
student activities an integral part of its program, with participation 

in one or more of it- organizations expected of every student. At tin 
end of each college year, .it the Alumni Luncheon in June those 
students who have taken part to an outstanding extent in college 
activities throughout the year are awarded a silver "A". A point 
system gauging leadership, activity, and ability, determines who shall 
he the recipients of these awards. 

Athletics 

The college stresses an athletic program to develop qualities of 
sportsmanship and to further the aims of the required physical educa- 
tion curriculum. 

Inter-Colleoiati; Sports 

The college engages in competitive sports with other junior colleges 
and comparable teams. Basketball is the major sport. Other inter- 
collegiate sports include golf, tennis, and swimming. 

The Intramural Program 

The intramural program provides a variety of activities that will 
appeal to the students and bring about their active participation, 
now and in later life, in games and sports that are physically whole- 
some, mentally stimulating, and socially sound. We expect our pro- 
gram to employ a part of the student's leisure time in physical 
activity and to be a contributing factor to the social success of his 
school life. The program also provides opportunity for every student 
to participate in competitive athletics. It is organized as a phase 
of the physical education program. 

The program is administered by an Intramural Board which is 
composed of the Director of Physical Educatoin, student managers, 
and a representative from each independent social club, of which 
at present there are four: The Loafers, Gators, Terrapins and Eager 
Beavers. 

The organization earning the highest number of points during the 
school year shall have its name placed on the Intramural Plaque, 
which is located in the lobby of the Armstrong Building. 



18 ARMSTRONG JUNIOR COLLEGE 



Bi i a Lambda 

The Home Economics Department maintains a club which meets 
monthly for discussion of current problems. In addition to its regular 
scheduled meetings, the club is frequently responsible for the prepara- 
tion and serving of refreshments at teas, dances, and receptions. In 
the decoration of student lounge rooms and a home economics class- 
room for art course-, practical experience is obtained in t! e purchase 
of furnishings, and in their effective arrangement and use. 



Engineering Society 

The Armstrong Engineering Society, youngest organization in the 

student activities program, was organized in the winter of 1947-8 to 
furnish the student engineer with a connection between his academic- 
training and the practical field of engineering by securing guest 
speakers from various fields of engineering, planning field trips to 
local industries, and obtaining motion pictures about practical engi- 
neering projects. 

Homecoming 

Early in the Christmas holiday season, the College holds the annual 
Homecoming Reception to which all students and alumni are invited. 

Music Club 

The Music Club meets twice each month for programs of classical 
recorded music. Varied and well-balanced programs of symphony 
and chamber music are arranged, and occasionally music of a lighter 
vein is included. Before each concert in the city, the Music Club 
presents the outstanding work announced for the concert, and in this 
manner serves to build up in its members a familiarity with classical 
music. 

Publication- 

Students have responsibility for three Armstrong publications: 
The Mercury, a magazine; The Inkwell Bulletin, a college newspa- 
per: and the Geechee, the college annual. Work on the Inkwell 
Bulletin, mimeographed weekly, provides opportunity for news re- 
porting, feature writing, and expression of student opinion. Student 
editorial and business talent is developed on all publications. Partici- 
pation in the preparation of the Geechee furnishes excellent 






GENERAL INFORMATION 19 



experience in photography, lay-out, and in organization generally. 
Here facility in handling and financing a publication is acquired 
and increased. 

The Geechee Report is published In the Alumni Association. Its 

purpose is to keep the .lluinni informed of activities l( t the college 

and to help them keep in touch with other alumni. 

Riding Clur 

1 lie Riding- Club meets each Saturday morning for rides through 
the beautiful wooded bridle paths of local riding schools. Expert 
instruction in riding is given to all beginners, and supervision is 
provided at all times if desired. A small monthly fee is charged. 

Savannah Playhouse 

The Savannah Playhouse of Armstrong Junior College is a com- 
munity theater sponsored and directed by the college. Here students 
may gain actual experience in acting, productino, set design and 
construction, lighting, make-up and all the theater skills that make 
a good production. 

Revived for the 1947-48 season after a five-year suspension of 
activity, the Playhouse quickly re-established its reputation .is one 
of the leading amateur theaters in the South with a calendar of five 
dramatic productions. 

My Sister Eileen, the Joseph Fields-Jerome Chodorov comedy hit. 
set the season off successfully and was followed by a Christmas-time 
production of Thornton Wildcr's one-act play. The Long Christmas 
Dinner. Maxwell Anderson's poetic tragedy, Wi?iterset, was the major 
production of the winter quarter and gained added prestige for the 
Playhouse. Pierre Patelin, a medieval French farce, was presented 
in March, and the season concluded with Oscar Wilde's great comedy 
of manners, The Importance of Being Earnest. The Playhouse also 
sponsored the appearance in Savannah of George 1 Freedlev. New York 
drama critic, w r ho lectured on the current Broadway season. 

Students may work with the Playhouse as an extracurricular activity 
or may earn college credit by taking the courses listed as Experimental 
Theater. Try-outs for roles in major dramatic productions are open 
to the public as well as students. 



20 ARMSTRONG JUNIOR COLLEGE 

S< »ROR] I II - 

There are two social sororities recognized by the college: Alpha 
rau Beta and Delta Chi. Membership in these groups is by imitation. 

The Student Forum 

The Student Forum meets twice each month for consideration of 
national, international and college topics which are of interest to 
tin student membership. Discussions, debates and guest speakers make 
up its programs. The Student Forum usually sponsors a dance and 
a party during the year. The members of the Student Forum assist 
in many ways in making the Armstrong Forum a success. Membership 
is open to any student who wishes to join. An invitation is not 
necessary. 

Student Senate 

The Student Senate is composed of the following representatives: 

the president of the sophomore and freshman classes: the editor of 
the Inkwell: the editor of the Geechee: one representative from 
each organization recognized by the Senate; and two freshman rep- 
resentatives to be elected by the class one wek after election of class 
offlcrs. This group, which meets from time to time throughout the 
year, serves as the official student agency for co-ordinating college 
activities and for expressing student opinion. 

Veterans' Social Club 

The youngest social club is the Veterans' Club, formed in April. 
l c )46. and having over sixty members in April. 1947. The purpose 
of this group is primarily social, but projects to promote the welfare 
of the college are planned. This club sponsors at least one formal 
and three informal dances each school year, and a banquet each June. 

Membership is open to all veterans of World War II who are 
enrolled as students at Armstrong Junior College. 

A i imm Association 

The Armstrong Alumni Association is composed of all formei 
students of Armstrong. Each June the association meets with the 
sophomore graduating class for luncheon and at this time alumni 
officers for the coming year are elected. 



GENERAL INFORMATION 21 



The college publishes an alumni bulletin monthly, the Cretin, 

Report, which is sent Out to .ill alumni with news of their activities 

and happenings at the college. The Report helps to keep more than 

one thousand alumni in touch with each other and Armstrong. 

Officers of the Armstrong Alumni Association for the year 1947-48 
are : 

Siegvart J. Robertson — President 

Frank Cheatham, Jr. — Vice-President 

Mrs. Jeanne Patterson Dabney — Secretary 

Mrs. Marie Lyons Crider — Treasurer 

Assemblies 

Bi-weekly student assemblies are held in Jenkins Auditorium. Be- 
cause the forums, speeches, etc., scheduled are regarded as a part 
of the whole educational program of the college, atendance is com- 
pulsory'. Important announcements are made at the assemblies, and 
recognized student activities are described and encouraged. 

One honor point is deducted on the student's permanent record 
card for each unexcused absence. The same number of honor points 
as quarter hours scheduled are required for graduation. 



Registration 

(For dates see calendar on page 1) 

New Si mi. nts 

A student planning to enter the college should request an applica- 
tion blank entitled "Application for Admission Card." When ihis 
completed form is received by the Registrar, a check is made of the 
Student's high school transcript. In the case of a transfer student, a 
check is made of his college transcript. A STUDENT PLANNING 
TO ENTER ARMSTRONG SHOULD REQUEST HIS HIGH 
SCHOOL PRINCIPAL OR THE COLLEGE REGISTRAR (in 
the case of a transfer student) TO SEND A TRANSCRIPT OF 
HIS CREDITS to the Registrar, Armstrong Junior College. Savan- 
nah. Georgia. 

A student planning to enter on the basis of the General Educational 
Development tests should request the Registrar to arrange with the 
Guidance Center for the administration of the entrance examinations. 

Having checked the student's records for compliance with the 
minimum requirements for admission, the Registrar will send a notice 
to the student that he has been admitted to the college, together with 
certain physical examination forms which must be completed and 
returned before the student can complete registration. The applicant 
will also be notified of the dates of the next aptitude testing program. 
These tests will not affect a student's entering Armstrong, but will 
enable the counseling staff to assist him in selecting the proper 
program of studies upon entrance. STUDENTS ARE REQUIRED 
TO TAKE THESE TEST MEASUREMENTS BEFORE REGIS- 
RATION. Members of the counseling staff are available by appoint- 
ment to interview prospective students at any time throughout the 
year. 

Admission by Certificate 

1. A candidate for admission to Armstrong Junior College must be 
a graduate of an accredited high school with sixteen units of credit. 

2. No subject-matter units are prescribed. The high school program 
should be of such nature as to give satisfactory preparation for 
beginning college studies. Subjects which may be expected to 
contribute to this end are English composition, literature, natural 



24 ARMSTRONG JUNIOR COLLEGE 



science, history and other social studies, foreign languages, and 
mathematics. The right is reserved to reject any applicant whose 
high school program does not indicate adequate preparation for 

college work. 

A record of high school credits earned by the applicant should be 
made out on the proper forms by an official of the high school 
and mailed directly to the office of the registrar. This certificate 
becomes the property of the Junior College and cannot be re- 
turned to the applicant. 

3. Three units in mathematics and one unit in physics or its equiva- 
lent is a prerequisite for admission to the freshman class in 
engineering. 

Admission by Examination 

Students who do not meet the above requirements for admission 
by certificate may take entrance examinations prescribed by the 
College. A fee of two dollars is charged for each examination taken. 
Entrance examinations must be completed at least one wek before 
registration. Additional information may be secured from the 
Registrar. 

Admission to Advanced Students 

Advanced credit will be allowed for work done in other institutions 
of proper rank and standing and for schools and experiences in the 
Armed Services. All work presented for advanced standing will be 
evaluated by the Registrar. To receive a diploma from Armstrong 
College, a student must be in attendance the two quarters preceding 
graduation, taking a normal load, and in addition, must satisfy all 
the requirements of a particular course of study. Adults (students 
over 20 years of age) may receive credit for certain college work 
on the basis of the General Educational Development Tests at the 
junior college level. 

Admission of Veterans of World War II 

In accordance with the recommendations of the State Department 
of Education that local high schools give diplomas to veterans who 
have completed four or more units of high school work in the local 
high schools and who make certain scores on each of the G.E.D. 
tests, Armstrong Junior College will accept veterans whose official 
test records show scores that indicate the applicant's capability to 
do college work. 






KKC1STKATI0N 25 



TRAN SCRIP! 5 OP C SPJ DITS 

Bach student is entitled to one official transcript of his college 
work. The charge for additional copies is $1.00 each. Requests for 
transcripts are complied with promptly when received in the Reg- 
istrar's office. Request must be made in writing. 

Rl PORTS AND ( rR \])1 s 

It is felt by Armstrong Junior College that students in college 
should be held accountable for their own scholarship. Accordingly, 
report cards, warnings of deficient scholarship, and other such notices 
are not sent out to parents or guardians by the college except by 
request. Instead, the students themselves receive these reports and 
are expected to contact the counseling staff whenever their work 
is unsatisfactory. Report cards are issued at the end of each quarter. 
Warnings are issued in the middle of each quarter. Each student has 
access to the counseling staff, made up of faculty members for pur- 
poses of advisement; and in addition, the Registrar, Dean of Students, 
and all instructors are ever ready to help and advz'se any student 
seeking counsel. 

Reports are based on the following system of grading: 

4 honor points per quarter hour 
3 honor points per quarter hour 
2 honor points per quarter hour 
2 honor points per quarter hour 
1 honor point per quarter hour 
1 honor point per quarter hour 
No honor points per quarter hour 
No honor points per quarter hour 
Condition must be removed during 

following quarter 
Course must be repeated 



may be removed by means stipulated 
by the instructor of the course in which the student received the 
grade E. An E not removed in the succeeding quarter automatically 
becomes an F. If a course in which an E grade was received is re- 
peated an F will be entered in the place of the E for the first time 
the course was taken. 



A plus 


Exceptional 


A 


Excellent 


B plus 


Very good 


B 


Good 


C plus 


Average 


C 


Fair 


D plus 


Poor 


D 


Very poor 


E 


Conditional failure 


F 


Failure 


W 


Withdrew 


WF 


Withdrew failing 


An E 


(conditional failure) 



26 ARMSTRONG JUNIOR COLLEGE 

Graduation 

In order to graduate, a student must complete one of the programs 
of study outlined in the catalog with an average of one honor point 
for each hour scheduled. Students lacking 10 quarter hours of work 
or less for graduation may complete these hours at an accredited 
senior college and receive a diploma from Armstrong Junior College 
upon application, furnishing the college with a transcript of the 
completed work. 

Normal Schedule 

The unit of work for a regular student is about 15-18 quarter hours 
per quarter. A normal schedule of sixteen quarter hours presupposes 
that the average student will devote approximately forty-eight hours 
per week to his college classes and to his preparation therefor. 

Permission to enroll for more than 17 quarter hours is granted 
when curricular requirements make such action necessary, or when 
evidence as to the capacity of the student seems to justify that the 
privilege be granted. 

Should a student's work load fall below the normal schedule, the 
student's parent or guardian (in case of veterans attending school 
under Public Laws 16 and 346, the Veterans Administration) will be 
notified. 

A student may drop a course at any time during the first five 
weeks of the quarter without incurring the penalty of a grade of 
"F" — Failed. If for a legitimate reason he is allowed to drop a course 
after that, a W (withdrawn) will be entered on his permanent record. 
Otherwise, the grade W/F is entered. No withdrawal from a course 
is official unless a prescribed form secured from the registrar's office 
is completed and returned. 

Explanation of Course Credit 

A lecture course carries with it a credit of one quarter hour for 
each hour it meets during the week throughout one quarter. A course 
running five hours a week for one quarter carries 5 quarter hours, 
or 3 1/3 semester hours credit. Laboratory courses, as a rule, allow 
one half quarter-hour credit for each hour of lab during the week. 



REGISTRATION 27 

\\ 1 1 KDRAWA1 S 

A formal withdrawal, presented in writing, is a prerequisite for 
honorable dismissal from, or re-cntrance into, this institution. Any 
student planning to withdraw should Immediately make sue}] inten- 
tions known to the administration of the school in writing. This 
notice i*> required to receive any authorized refunds. 

Dismissals \m> Permission to Re-Register 

Any student failing (except in cases excused before examinations 
on account of illness) to pass at least one course other than physical 
education in any one quarter will be dropped from the rolls of the 
college. Any student who fails to make an average of at least twenty 
honor points during the first three quarters work at the Junior College 
will not be allowed to re-register. Withdrawal is recommended to 
all students who have less than a "C" average at the end of the 
fourth quarter of college work. At the end of the sixth quarter's 
work a student must have sixty honor points in order to re-register. 

Files and Refunds 

Fees will be charged according to the student's load in quarter 
hours. A normal load is 16 to 17 quarter hours each term or quarter. 

Fees for residents of Fees for other resi- Fees for non-rcsi- 

Chatham County dents of Georgia dents of Georgia 

5 quarter hours $22.00 $26.00 $33.00 

10 quarter hours 36.00 43.00 54.00 

14-18 quarter hours 50.00 60.00 75.00 

A student who was on the Dean's List the preceding quarter may 
take in excess of the normal load upon payment of $1.00 per quarter 
hour for the extra course. If for any reason other students are per- 
mitted to take work in excess of the normal load, the charge will 
be $2.00 for each quarter hour of the extra course. 

Students taking laboratory work will be required to pay a fee for 
materials and equipment. This fee is indicated in the description of 
courses found under "Course Descriptions" elsewhere in this bulletin. 

A student activity-athletic fee of $4.00 per quarter will be charged 
all students. This fee will entitle the student to subscriptions to the 
Geechee. the college annual, and other college publications, and to 
admission to college-sponsored dances. Playhouse, and athletic events. 



28 ARMSTR ONG JUNIOR COLLEGE 

Anyone wishing to audit a course (but not to receive college credit) 
may do so with permission of the instructor by paying a fee of $10.00 
per course. 

A late registration fee of $2.00 will be charged any student who 
fails to register and pay fees on the day designated for registration 
at the beginning of each quarter unless he presents a doctor's excuse. 

Fees will be returned to students withdrawing during the first three 
days of any quarter. Anyone withdrawing thereafter during the first 
thirty days of a quarter will receive a refund of one-half of the regis- 
tration fee. The approval of the Registrar is required of any student 
desiring a refund for withdrawal. No refund will be made to students 
dropping a course. 

Any student delinquent in the payment of any fees due the college 
wil have grade reports and transcripts of records held up, and will 
not be allowed to re-register at the college for a new quarter until 
the delinquency has been removed. 

A fee of $5.00 will be collected from each candidate for graduation 
to cover cost of invitations, diploma, and rental of cap and gown. 

Honors 

Students who have been in attendance for three consecutive quar- 
ters, who have achieved an average of "B" or better, and who have 
no grades below that of "C" will be placed on a Permanent Dean's 
List in a book for that purpose kept in the office of the President. 
The college will publish a Permanent Dean's List at the end of each 
academic year. 

Students who maintain a grade of "B" or better in each course 
during a quarter will be placed on the Dean's Scholastic Attainment 
List. 

The designation summa cum laude (with highest distinction) will 
be bestowed upon those graduating with an average of 3 honor points 
per quarter hour. 

The designation cum laude (with distinction) will be bestowed 
upon those with an average of 2 honor points per quarter hour. 

A valedictorian will be elected by the graduating class from among 
the five students with the highest scholastic average in the work com- 
pleted before the term in which the students graduate. 



REGISTRATION 29 

Ik i SHM \n Wi i R 

Students wishing to entei Armstrong Junior College must submit 
a completed physical examination form which will be furnished the 
applicant when accepted. 

Freshmen must also have taken certain interest, aptitude, and achieve- 
ment tests to register. These tests will he administered at the college 
Sptember 2-.\ 1948. Applicants will be notified when and where 
to report .The results of these te^ will he used in counseling entering 
students. September 13-17, and will save them time and trouble in 
selecting programs of study. 

Freshmen will report to the auditorium of Jenkins Hall at nine 
o'clock, Tuesday morning, September 21, and will be registered in 
the order in which they completed their entrance tests. SEND IN 
APPLICATION BLANKS EARLY. 

An orientation program is set up (a) to acquaint students with 
the problems that arise in college and to inform them of the type 
of study needed to use their advantages wisely; (b) to explain the 
different curricula; (c) to describe the physical layout of the college, 
and the extra-curricula activities at the college. 

How to Make Out a Program 

i. The student should decide what he is going to prepare for, 
after full discussion and consideration of his interests and qualifica- 
tions with parents and friends who can help him, and after interviews 
wtih members of the faculty and the guidance staff. Especially 
trained personnel comprising the guidance staff will make an appoint- 
ment with the student during his first quarter here. Together with 
this counselor, he will work out a tentative list of the subjects to 
be taken during each of the quarters he plans to be at Armstrong. 
This list will be kept for future reference so that he may build his 
program each quarter with a definite goal in mind. It is necessary 
to work out such a program in order to graduate. 

2. If the student changes his objective and wishes to change his 
program of study, he will report this fact to the counseling staff. 

If completion of his training involves going to another school 
after he leaves Armstrong, the following steps are advisable: 

a. Secure the college's catalog and see what courses must be 
completed at Armstrong to meet the degree requirements at the 
senior college. 



:;<» ARMSTRONG JUNIOR COLLEGE 



b. Schedule the prerequisites for the courses to be taken later. 

c. Make a list of the subjects to be taken at Armstrong Junior 
College for each of the quarters before transferring, and be sure 
it includes all of the courses required for junior class standing. 

Advisers Ari Counselors \nd Friends 

No student should attempt to plan his course without consulting 

the bulletins of information issued by the various state colleges, uni- 
versities and departments of universities. Every university, college 
or department has its own particular and specific requirements for 
entering regular third year work: and unless the student is most 
careful in his selection of subjects during the first year, he will in- 
evitably lose time, a feature which is entirely unnecessary if the 
student enters the junior college with a full knowledge of University 
requirements. 

Likewise, there are specific requirements for all sorts of jobs and 
positions, and unless the student has satisfactorily fulfilled them, the 
jobs will net be open to him. The student should not try to select 
courses without consultation with an adviser. It is not fair to him 
or to the college. 

Since the counselor is the individual to whom requests for personal 
recommendations are referred, the student is urged to acquaint the 
counselor with his whole program, including the entire scope of his 
activities, hopes and aspirations, as well as his program of studies. 
Practically all reliable enterprises now require personal recommenda- 
tions as well as academic ratings. The officials of the school can assist 
many to be placed in schools, industry or business when they can 
give a full and complete account of the student's personal as well 
ademic qualifications. To this end certain teachers are asked to 
file two-tofive word summary statements for each of their students. 
to be used in the formulation of the recommendations which may 
later be required. Such qualities as honestv. neatness, punctuality, 
loyalty, industry, dependability, ability to get along with others, etc., 
arc of paramount importance. 

Rr.COM M F.NDATION S 

The recommendations issued by the junior college are written in 
terms of the grades the student earns, and what his teachers think 
of him as expressed by them at the close of his work in each class 
in a written report to the Registrar. The<e reports are a part of 



UKUSTRATION 31 



his permanent record. They correspond to employers' records of 
employees. 

A I I I NDANl I 

Students are required to attend classes as scheduled. Any absence, 
whatsoever, from classwork entails a loss to the student. No absence 
is excused except for personal sickness, serious illness in the family, 
or other urgent reasons accepted by the college faculty. FOR EACH 
UNEXCUSED ABSENCE, IN EXCESS OF THE NUMBER OF 
CREDIT HOURS IN THE COURSE, the student will be penalized 
one honor point. The total number of honor points deducted for any 
one course will not exceed the credit hours in the course. It is the 
responsibility of the student to give the instructor his excuse for each 
absence. Special departmental regulations may be applied for labora- 
tory courses. It is the responsibility of the student further to arrange 
w -tin his instructor to make up an announced quiz within a week of 
the date that quiz was given. At the discretion of the instructor a fee 
of $2.00, payable to the Treasurer, will be charged. A student who 
arrives in class after the roll has been checked will be counted absent 
unless he presents the instructor with a satisfactory explanation of 
his tardiness. 

A student who makes the Dean's List for two consecutive quarters 
will be exempt during the ensuing quarter from the regulatoins 
governing absences and will be exempt thereafter so long as he 
remains on the Dean's List. To the foregoing regulation there are to 
be the following exceptions: (a) The privilege of absence does not 
apply to requirements of attendance relative to written or laboratory 
work or to quizzes and examinations; (b) the privilege earned by the 
student shall be forfeited if that student is absent without excuse 
immediately before or immediately after holidays; (c) it is understood 
that the instructor in any course has the right to consider participa- 
tion by the student in class discussion as a necessary part of the work 
upon which he bases the final grade. Thus, a student having honor 
roll privilege who absents himself more than the instructor thinks 
is reasonable for this purpose, may earn a lower grade, as a result 
of non-attendance, than would be shown by the examination grade 
alone. 



Course Requirements for Graduation 

Si GO] STI I) CURRIGUl \ 

All curricula suggested here are subject to modifications. Last- 
minute adjustments will be made. Check "Description of courses" 
in this catalog and current schedule of classes for the quarter and 
hour subjects will be offered. 

The curricula hereafter outlined are suggestive only. They may 
be materially changed by the student in conference with his adviser, 
who will assist him to build a course of study upon his own interests, 
abilities, and previous training in the light of his chosen objective. 
Students wishing to receive a 2-year diploma from Armstrong Junior 
College must schedule the core curriculum. 

The purpose of these courses is to accomplish a well rounded two- 
year program in preparation for some specific occupation, or to enter 
some higher professional course. 

Subjects are listed from 10 through 19, indicating work that is 
usually taken in the Freshman year and from 20 through 29 indi- 
cating subjects recommended for study in the Sophomore year. 

The Core Curriculum 

The following courses are required of all students desiring to com- 
plete a 2-year program of study for a degree from the junior college. 
One-year certificates are offered in certain terminal progams of study 
which do not require the core curriculum; e.g. the one-year certificate 
in stenography. PLAN YOUR PROGRAM OF STUDY with the 
counseling staff. 

First Year 

Quarter 
Subject Hours 

English 11-12-13 9 

History 11-12-13 9 

Science (with lab) 10 

Physical Education 3 

Second Year 

English 21-22-23 9 

Physical Education 3 

Total 43 



34 ARM STRONG -JUNIOR COLLEGE 

Service Courses in Physical Education 

All freshmen and sophomore*, will be given periodical examina- 
tions. On this basis, they will be divided into two (lasses, class one 
and class two. Students in class one will he given special exercises 
suited to their individual needs. Students in class two will be assigned 
regular required and elective activities. 

Service courses: 
Physical Education 11-12-13 Required of all Freshmen. 
Physical Education 21-22-28* Required of all Sophomores. 
* Women substitute P.E. 26 or 27 for P.E. 22. 
Associate in Applied Arts 
(Terminal) 

This course is designed to meet the needs of those women who 
plan to complete their college education at Armstrong. It will give 
a background in typing and shorthand that is adequate for securing 
a position at the completion of the two-year program: and at the 
same time, the home economics courses included will be an invaluable 
aid in home-making and household management. 

Including the core curriculum, the student will complete a total 
of 100 hours: the following are suggested: 

Quarter 
Subject Hours 

Core Curriculum 43 

Com. 1 1 a-b-c Typing .... 6 
Com. 12 a-b-c Shorthand . . .15 
Math 1 1 Basic Mathematics . . 3 

Soc. 21 Marriage 5 

*HE 21 Home Planning and 

Furnishing 5 

*HE 12 Foods 5 

*HE 11 Clothing 5 

*HE 22 Nutrition Electives ... 5 

* Other courses such as Child Development, Art Household Engineering, etc., 
may be substituted. 

Associate in Commerce 

(Terminal) 

Upon completion of this program of study, the student should 
be able to fill competently the requirements of a secretary or book- 



REGISTRATION 



.">:> 



keeper in the modem business office. This curriculum was added 
.,s a result of the many requests received from employers For college 
students with secretarial training. 

Including tin- core curriculum, tin- student tor the two-year diploma 
should complete 100 quarter hours of work, selecting .ill the typing, 
shorthand, and accounting courses, and electives chiefly from the 
commercial field. 



One-Year Stenographic Course 



A certificate (hut not diploma) will be given students qualifying 
in the one-year stenographic course. A student who knows he has 
only one year to attend college may herein master the tools that 
will better enable him to earn a livelihood. 



Subject 

Com. 11 a-b-c Typing . . 
Com. 12 a-b-c Shorthand . 
Com. 24-25-26 Accounting 
Com. 17 Office Practice . 
Physical Education . . . 
Electives 



Quarter 
Hours 

6 
15 
15 

3 

3 
10 



Associate in Engineering 
(Senior College Preparatory) 



This program will satisfy degree requirements for the first two 
years of most types of engineering but should be varied for certain 
fields, such as chemical, electrical, and industrial management. The 
student should obtain a catalog from the senior college he plans to 
attend and have his adviser check his program with him against the 
catalog. 

Chemical engineers should omit Engineering 21, 22, 23, 24, 26, 
and Economics 23 and substitute Chemistry 24, 25, and 26. 

Students planning to major in Industrial Management should 
omit Engineering 21, 22, 23, 24, 26 and Economics 23 and substitute 
Commerce 24, 25 and 26. 

Architectural engineering students should plan to continue their 
second year elsewhere. 



36 



ARMSTRONG JUNIOR COLLEGE 



First Year 

Quarter 
Subject Hours 

Mathematics 16-17-18 . . . .15 

English 11-12-13 9 

History 11-12-13 9 

Chemistry 14-15 12 

Engineering 11-12-13 . . . . 9 
Physical Education 11-12-13 . . 3 
Engineering 26 2 



Second Year 

Mathematics 21-22-23 
English 21-22-23 . . 
Physics 21-22-23 . . 
Engineering 21-22-23 
Engineering 24 . . 
Economics 23 . . . 
Physical Education 21-22-23 



15 
9 

18 
3 
3 
4 
3 



Associate in Home Economics 
(Senior College Preparatory) 



This program of study is preparatory for the junior class in the 
senior college. Home economics offers many vocational and pro- 
fessional opportunities for women in such varied fields as textiles, 
institutional management, nutrition, dress designing, household man- 
agement, dietetics, child development and food research. 

Armstrong has one of the best equipped Home Economics De- 
partments in this part of the country and therefore can broaden 
the scope of its courses to meet the needs of many students. 

Including the core curriculum, the student should complete 100 
hours from the following courses: 

Quarter 
Subject Hours 

Core Curriculum 43 

Additional Science 10 

HE 10 Survey of the Field . . 2 

HE 11 Clothing 5 

HE 21 Home Furnishing ... 5 
Art 11 . . . 5 



REGISTRATION -M 

\\\ . 21 Elementary Psychology .. 5 
Math 1 1 Basic Mathematics . . 3 

hi: r.MuU 5 

*HE 24 Child Development . . 5 
111'. 25 Household Engineering . 5 

Soc. 21 Marriage 5 

Electives 2 

* HE 13, HE 15 or HE 22 may be substituted for one of these courses depend- 
in on the student's objective. 

Associate in Liberal Arts 
(Senior College Preparatory) 

This course, while cultural in content, also furnishes the first two 
years of the degree requirements for journalism, business administra- 
tion, law, education, and majors in social studies, English, music, 
drama, or the foreign languages. Whether or not a student intends 
to continue his formal education, the liberal arts program of study 
increases his understanding of the world in which he lives and adds 
to his appreciation of it. 

Including the core curriculum the student will select from the sub- 
jects below sufficient courses to complete a minimum of not less than 
100 quarter hours for the two years. 

Quarter 
Subject Hours 

Core Curriculum 43 

Mathematics 9 

Foreign Language 10 

^Social Studies 15 

Electives 

* The social studies include economics, education, history, political science., psy- 
chology, and sociology. 

Associate in Physical Education 

(Senior College Preparatory) 

The Physical Education Department is qualified to provide the 
first two years of preparation for a major in the field of Health and 
Physical Education for those students planning to enter the field of 
Education or Supervised Recreation. 

Each student planning to major in Health and Physical Education 
or Supervised Recreation should take certain courses. 

Including the core curriculum, the student should complete 100 
hours from the following courses: 



ARMSTRONG Jl'NIOR COLLEGE 



Quarter 
Subject Hours 

Core Curriculum 43 

Additional Science 10 

Psy. 21 Elementary Psychology . 5 
Soc. 21 Elementary Sociology . 5 

Hygiene 11 3 

HE 23 Nutrition 5 

Math 11-12-13 9 

Psy. 23 Child Psychology . . . 5 

*P.E. 23-24 3 

Education 21 3 

Electives 10 

* Women will substitute P.E. 26, 27 or 29. 
Associate in Sciences 

(Senior College Preparatory) 

Students planning to major in science, medicine, dentistry, phar- 
macy, or veterinary medicine, to be laboratory technicians, or to 
go into any scientific field should select the following program of 
studies. 

This course is also recommended for students who wish to have 
deeper insight into the physical and natural world about them. Tech- 
nological advances require one to have a broad foundation in the 
sciences if he is to understand common, everyday occurrences. Since 
we live in a scientific age, this course is also recommended as a 
terminal course. 

Including the core curriculum the student should complete 100 
hours from the following courses: 

Quarter 

Subject Hours 

Core Curriculum 43 

*Math 16-17-18 15 

Chemistry 14-15 6 

Biology- 11-12 10 

Chemistry 24 — Qualitative 

Analysis 5 

**Foreign Language 15 

Electives 15 

* Pred-med students may substitute electives for Math 17 and 18. Consult senior 
college requirements. Math 11-12-19 is acceptable. 

** Pre-med students should take German or French. 



Course Descriptions 



( .1 m ral Inform \ 1 1< >\ 

Armstrong Junior College reserves the right to (1) withdraw any 

course for which less than ten students register, (2) limit the enroll- 
ment in any course or class section. (3) fix the time of meeting of 
all classes and sections, and (4) offer such additional courses as de- 
mand and staff personnel warrant. 

After each course, the first number listed is the number of hours 
of lecture: the second, the number of hours of lab: and the third, 
the number of hours of quarter hour credit the course carries; e.g. 
3-3-4 means 3 hours of class, 3 hours lab, 4 hours credit. 



ART 

(See Fine Arts) 

BIOLOGY 

Biology 1 1 — General Zoology (3-4-5). Fall and Winter. Labora- 
tory fee, $3.50. 

Introduction to animal structure and function using a vertebrate 
for most of the laboratory work. 

Biology 12 — General Zoology (3-4-5). Winter and Spring. Lab- 
atory fee, $3.50. Prerequisite, Biology 11. 

Principles of Evolution and Genetics, and survey of the invertebrate 
phyla. Laboratory work on invertebrates. 

Biology 22 — Invertebrate Zoology (3-6-6). Spring. Laboratory 
fee, $5.00. Prerequisite, Biology 11 and 12. 

A study of the structure and function of invertebrates. Field trips 
for studying animals and their natural habitats will be included. 

Biology 23 — Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy (3-6-6). Fall. 
Laboratory fee, $5.00. Prerequisite, Biology 11 and 12. 

A study of the anatomy and evolution of the organ systems of 
the vertebrates. 



40 ARMSTRONG JUNIOR COLLEGE 



CHEMISTRY 

Chemistry 1 1 - Introductory General Chemistry (4-2-5). Winter. 
Laboratory fee, $3.50. 

This is an introductory course designed for the non-science stu- 
dents. A study of some of the elements and their compounds and a 
review of practical chemistry are included. 

Chemistry 12 - Introductory General Chemistry (4-2-5). Spring. 
Laboratory fee, $3.50. 

A continuation of Chemistry 11. 

Chemistry 14 — General Chemistry (5-3-6). Fall and Spring. 
Laboratory fee, $3.50. 

This is a course in general descriptive chemistry designed for 
engineering, science and pre-medical students. The fundamental laws, 
some elements and their compounds are studied. 

Chemistry 15 — General Chemistry (5-3-6). Winter and Summer. 
Laboratory fee, $3.50. 

A continuation of Chemistry 14. 

Chemistry 19 -History of Chemistry (3-0-3). Fall. Prerequisite, 
Chemistry, 12 or 15. 

A brief survey of the history of chemistry from the ancient alchem- 
ists up to the present "atomic age." 

Chemistry 24 — Qualitative Analysis (3-6-5). Fall. Laboratory fee, 
$5.00. Prerequisite, Chemistry 15 and Mathematics 12 or 16. 

The lectures include a study of the theoretical and fundamental 
principles of the subject, as well as a thorough study of the reactions 
of the more important ions. The laboratory- work includes the syste- 
matic analysis for both anions and cations by a semi-micro scheme. 

Chemistry 25 - Quantitative Analysis Volumetric (3-6-5). Win- 
ter. Laboratory fee, $5.00. Prerequisite, Chemistry 24. 

This is an elementary course in quantitative analysis using volu- 
metric procedures. 

Chemistry 26 - Quantitative Analysis. Gravimetric (3-6-5). Spring. 
Laboratory fee. $5.00. Prerequisite, Chemistry- 25. 



(WRSK INSCRIPTIONS 41 



This is an elementary course in quantitative analysis using gravi- 
metric procedures. 

Chemistry 28 — Industrial Chemistry Survey (2-3-3). Spring. Lab- 
oratory fee, $1.50. 

This is an elementary course in the industrial applications of chem- 
istry. The topics studied will be followed by inspection trips to ap- 
propriate local industries wherever possible. These trips will constitute 
the laboratory, 

COMMERCE 

Commerce 1 1 A - Beginning Typing (0-5-2). Fall. Laboratory fee, 
$3.50. 

This course consists of introductory instruction in the technical 
features and care of the machine, position, fingering, proper tech- 
nique and mastery of the keyboard. An average speed of thirty words 
a minute is attained. 

Commerce 1 IB - Intermediate Typing (0-5-2). Winter. Labora- 
tory fee, $3.50. Prerequisite, Commerce 11A or equivalent. 

A typewriter course in which emphasis is placed on speed building 
and accuracy. Special typing problems such as business letters, min- 
utes, notices, stencil cutting and carbon copies are stressed. An 
average speed of 40 words a minute is attained. 

Commerce 1 1C - Intermediate Typing, continued (0-5-2). Spring. 
Laboratory fee, $3.50. Prerequisite, Commerce 11A-11B or equivalent. 

Continuation of Commerce 1 IB. 

Commerce 12A - Beginning Shorthand (5-0-5). Fall. 

Complete theory of Gregg Shorthand in the Manual. Additional 
reading and dictation given from the Speed Studies. 

Commerce 12B-A continuation of Commerce 12 A (5-0-5). 
Winter. 

Commerce 12C — Intermediate Shorthand (5-0-5) .Spring. 

Dictation and transcription of new and studied material. Student 
is required to take dictation at the rate of eighty words a minute. 



[2 ARMSTRONG JUNIOR COLLEGE 

Commera I -1 - Burroughs Calculator and Comptometer (0-5-2). 
Fall. Laboratory fee, $3.50. 

111.- objective of this course is to build speed and accuracy in the 
operation of the Burroughs Calculator and Comptometer and a 
thorough review of business mathematics. This quarter is devoted to 
the operation of the four fundamentals in arithmetic on the calculator. 

Chemistry 13B - Buroughs Calculator and Comptometer (0-5-2). 
Winter. 

The following business mathematics arc reviewed and applied on 
the machine during this quarter: decimal equivalents, split division, 
invoicing over the fixed decimal, percentages, discounts, and chain 
discounts, cost, selling price and rate of profit. 

Commerce 13C - Burroughs Calculator and Comptometer (0-5-2). 
Spring. 

The third quarter is a continuation of business problems on the 
machine. The transactions covered are reciprocals, figuring grain, 
cipher division, prorating cost and expense, gross and dozen in 
invoicing inventories. 

Commerce 15 — Business Communications (0-5-3). Winter. 

A study of business correspondence, letters, information reports, 
follow-up sales programs, statistical analyses, and inter-office com- 
munications. Stress is placed on the mastery of fundamentals of clear 
writing. 

Commerce 17 -Office Practice (0-5-3). Spring. 

Typical business office situations are duplicated as nearly as possible. 
Practical problems deal with dictation and transcription, typing, op- 
eration of the mimeograph, filing and office courtesy. 

Commerce 19 - Modern Business Mathematics (3-0-3). Spring. 
Prerequisite: Mathematics 11-12 or its equivalent. 

This course gives that background necessary for dealing wtih prob- 
lems found in banking, real estate, financing, and accounting; the 
operation of the Compound Interest Law in business; simple problems 
concerning bonds, sinking funds, valuation of properties, annuities, and 
insurance. Practical problems in these fields will be emphasized. The 
necessary aids and shortcuts with use of tables and logarithms will be 
studied. 






COURSE DESCRIPTIONS !■'• 

( mmera 21 A -Advanced Typing '■ FaU. Laboratory 

fee, $3.50, PrerequisitCj Commerce 11C or equivalent. 

Advanced typing is a cnuv^- in the acquisition of speed and a< i ui 
including various legal forms and papers, manuscripts, and business 
papers. An average oi 65 words a minute is attained. 

( ■/;-.! continuation of Commerce 21 A (0-5-2). Win- 

ter. Laboratory fee, $ 1.50. 

( rnmerce 21C — A continuation of Commerce 21 B (0-5-2). 
Spring. Laboratory fee, $ 1.50. 

Commerce 22 A —Advanced Stenography (5-0-5). Fall. Prerequi- 
site, Commerce 12A, B, C. 

A course in which the principles of Gregg Shorthand arc applied 
in developing skill and accuracy in writing shorthand and in tran- 
scribing. The first half year is devoted to dictation of general business 

material: the second half, to dictation material applying to 16 major 
vocations. A speed of 120 words a minute for 5 minutes is required. 

Commerce 22B - Commerce 22A continued (5-0-5). Winter. 
Commerce 22C - Continuation of Commerce 22B (5-0-5). Spring. 

Commerce 23 A - Advanced Calculator and Comptometer (0-5-2). 
Fall. 

The next two quarters are devoted to the application of the ma- 
chine and business mathematics to the following businesses: drugs, 
hardware, electrical, plumbing, contracting, wholesale paper, pay- 
roll, packing house, creameries and dairies, laundries, steel and iron, 
department stores, banks, lumber, petroleum, railroads. 

Commerce 23B - Commerce 23 'A continued (0-5-2). Winter. 

Commerce 23C — Advanced Calculator and Comptometer (0-5-2). 
Spring. 

Speed, skill and accuracy in the operation of the machine are 
stressed in this last period. 

Commerce 24 - Introductory Accounting (5-0-5). Fall. 

This course is designed to familiarize the students with accounting 
procedures that may come within the scope of their responsibilities. 
A knowledge of the journal, ledger, trial balance, work sheet, income 



44 ARMSTRONG JUNIOR COLLEGE 



statement, balance sheet, credit transaction, and special journals is 
developed during this quarter 

Commerce 25 - Introductory Accounting, continued (5-0-5). 
Winter. 

This quarter is devoted to a study of the special ledgers, and con- 
trolling accounts; depreciation; loss on bad debts; accrued and de- 
ferred items; business papers; payroll procedures; payroll taxes; the 
voucher system; partnership formation and operation. One practice 
set is completed during this second quarter. 

Commerce 26 — Intermediate Accounting (5-0-5). Spring. 

A continuation of partnership and its dissolution is studied in this 
quarter; also, corporation proprietorship; corporation accounts and 
records; corporation surplus, stocks and bonds. The second practice 
set on corporations is completed. 

Commerce 27 — Business Law (5-0-5). Fall. 

Contracts: nature of a contract, offer and acceptance, considera- 
tion, void and voidable contracts, unenforceable contracts, perform- 
ance, rights of third parties, and discharge. 

Agency: creation of an agency, principal and third party, principal 
and agent, agent and third party. 

Negotiable instruments: introduction to law of negotiable instru- 
ments, types of negotiable instruments, creation, negotiation, holders 
and holders in due course, rights and liabilities of parties, performance 
of conditions precedent, discharge checks, banks and banking. 

Commerce 28 - Business Law (5-0-5). Winter. Prerequisite, Com- 
merce 27. 

Sales, partnerships, corporations. 

ECONOMICS 

Economics 21 —Introduction to Economic Theory and Problems 
(5-0-5). Summer and Winter. 

This course presents a survey of economic thought of the past 
and present, makes an analysis of the economic institutions of today, 
and examines some of the major economic problems in the modern 
world. 

Economics 22 — Economic Geography (5-0-5). Spring. 






COIKSK INSCRIPTIONS 45 



I'his course concerns itself with two distinct aspects: (1) com- 
modities whose production and distribution are significanl in industry 
and commerce, particularly the food materials, textile fibers, and 
minerals; (2) consideration of commercial areas of the world from 
an economic standpoint. A brief examination of physical geography 
will be made as a background for this area analysis. 

Economics 23 - An Introduction to Engineering Economy (4-0-4). 
Winter and Summer. 

An introduction to basic economic laws, interest and annuities, 
valuation and depreciation, investments and investment statements, 
financing of engineering enterprises, and use of the geographical and 
statistical analysis methods. Economic problems relating to engineer- 
ing are given special emphasis. 

ENGINEERING 

Engineering 10 -Slide Rule (1-1-1). Spring and Summer. 
A course in the practical use of the engineer's slide rule. 

Engineering 1 1 — Engineering Drawing (0-6-3). Fall and Spring. 
Rent for drawing instruments and equipment $2.50. 

Topics of study include lettering, the use of the instruments, ortho- 
graphic projection, auxiliary views, section. 

Engineering 12 — Engineering Drawing (0-6-3). Winter. Pre- 
requisite, Engineering 11. Rent for drawing instruments and equip- 
ment $2.50. 

Topics of study include sections, dimensions, limit dimensions, pic- 
torial representation, threads and fastenings, shop processes, technical 
sketching, working drawings, pencil tracing on paper, reproduction 
processes. 

Engineering 13 - Engineering Drawing (0-6-3). Spring. Pre- 
requisite, Engineering 12. Rent for drawing instruments and equip- 
ment $2.50. 

Topics of study include technical sketching of piping and fittings, 
working drawings, ink tracing on cloth, working drawings from as- 
semblies, and assemblies from working drawings. 

Engineering 21 - Descriptive Geometry (0-3-1). Fall. Prerequisite, 
Engineering 1 1 . 



j*6 ARMSTRONG JUNIOR COLLEGE 

Topics of study include the solution of problems involving points, 
lines and planes by auxiliary view methods. Practical applications 
arc emphasized. 

Engineering 22 - Descriptive Geometry (0-3-1). Winter. A con- 
tinuation of subjects studied in Engineering 21 including solutions by 
rotation methods, simple intersections, the development of surfai 

Engineering 23 - Descriptive Geometry (0-3-1). Spring. Topics 
studied include the intersection of surfaces; warped surfaces. Practical 
applications are emphasized. 

Engineering 24 — Applied Mechanics (2-3-3). Spring. 

Topics of study include elements of statics: law of equilibrium 
applied to machines and structures, law of friction applied to simple 
machines, and analysis of simple structures, trusses and cranes. Prob- 
lems will be solved both graphically and analytically. 

Engineering 25 - Elements .of Electrical Engineering (2-3-3). 
Spring. Prerequisites, Physics 22. 

Fundamental theory of electric, magnetic and electro-static circuits. 

Engineering 26 - Plane Surveying (1-3-2). Fall and Spring. 

Theory and practice in chaining, differential and profile leveling, 
traversing, topographic surveying, reduction and plotting of field 
notes, and mapping. 

ENGLISH 

English A -Review of Fundamentals (5-0-0). Fall and Spring. 

A non-credit course in the use of the English language. This course 
is a prerequisite for English 1 1 for those students whose score on the 
English placement test indicates that they are not equipped for 
English 11. Attendance in this class will also be required of students 
in other English courses whose use of English indicates their need 
for special work in language. For those students, English A will be 
considered a prerequisite for graduation. 

English 1 1 - Freshman English (3-0-3). Fall. Winter and Spring. 

This course is devoted to punctuation and the fundamentals of 
grammar, theme writing, and vocabulary building. Also the student 
reads and discusses selections from the works of the most prominent 
literary figures of the Western World. 



COURSK DKSCKIITIONS 47 



English 12 -Continuation of English 11 ('3-0-3). Fall. Winter 

English l'A- Continuation of English 12 (3-0-3). Winter, Spring 
and Summer. 

English 21 -Survey of World Literature (3-0-3). Fall and Spring. 

This course is designed to give the student a knowledge of the 
principal works of certain major writers. The student reads in some 
detail several hundred pages from the works of selected authors whose 
thought or style has been of world-wide significance. The last third 
of the course deals with modern trends in literature and thought. 
At intervals, students are asked to write papers, and emphasis is 
constantly placed on the improvement of the student's ability to 
express himself. 

English 22 -Continuation of English 21 (3-0-3). Fall, Winter 
and Summer. 

English 23 -Continuation of English 22 (3-0-3). Winter, Spring 
and Summer. 

English 24 -An Introduction to Poetry (5-0-5). Fall. (Not of- 
fered in 1948.) 

A study of the various types and forms of poetry with special 
emphasis on the works of the more recent British and American poets. 

English 25 — American Literature (5-0-5). Spring. (Not offered in 
1949.) 

A survey of American literature and culture. In this course the 
student reads somewhat fully from works of a comparatively small 
number of notable and representative American writers. This course 
is primarily devoted to reading and discussion, but each student is 
asked also to select one particular period or author for concentra- 
tion, making reports and writing papers in that phase of the work. 

English 26A- Advanced Composition (3-0-3). Fall. 

Advanced writing practice. The course is designed to equip the 
student to express his ideas in clear, well-organized, and interesting 
prose. Various techniques of composition are considered, but the main 
portion of the course is devoted to the writing and re-writing of 
exposition. 

English 26B- Continuation of English 26A (3-0-3). Winter. 



48 ARMSTRONG JUNIOR COLLEGE 

English 27 — Reading Modern Drama (5-0-5). Spring. 

Students will participate in class reading and discussion of selected 
dramas. The plays will not be acted. The course is expected to im- 
prove the student's diction and reading. 



EDUCATION 

Education 21 - Introduction to Education (3-0-3) .Fall. 

A brief survey of the field of education, including the topics, aims, 
organization, methods of financing, curriculum, constructions, quali- 
fication of teachers, ethics of the profession, etc. 



FINE ARTS 

Art 11 -Creative Art (2-6-5). Fall. 

Drawing, art principles, and design with work in other media at 
the discretion of the instructor. Some application will be made to 
poster-making, lettering, and everyday life needs. Each student is 

Music 21 -Great Music (3-0-3). Winter. 

A course designed to introduce the student to such varied musical 
forms as the fugue, the sonata, the symphony, the concerto, and the 
tone poem. The lives and general backgrounds of the major com- 
posers will be discussed. Lectures and class discussions will be supple- 
mented by the playing of records. 

Music 22 — Continuation of Music 21 (3-0-3). Spring. 

Experimental Theatre 11 (3-4-5). Fall. 

A survey of theatre history with emphasis on production methods. 
In the laboratory students will immediately become a part of an 
active producing company. Plays will be selected, cast, directed, de- 
signed, lighted, and costumed by students, and will be performed 
before invited audiences. The group will work directly with the 
Savannah Playhouse. 

Experimental Theatre 12 (3-4-5). Winter. 

Emphasis on speech control. No prerequisites. 

Experimental 'Theatre 13 (3-4-5). Spring. 

Emphasis on acting and speech. No prerequisites. 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS [9 

1 ( REIGN LANGI v. I S 

Fri nch 
Fundi 1 1 — Elementary French (5-0-5). Fall and Spring. 

A course for beginners. Emphasis is placed on the spoken language. 
Grammar composition and reading are included in the course. In ad- 
dition to the five hours of class work, two hours a week of supervised 
drill will be scheduled to assist the students in oral practice. 

French 12 — Continuation of French 11 (5-0-5). Winter and 
Summer. 

French 21 - Intermediate French (5-0-5). Fall. 

A course in review grammar. Oral and written practice: reading 
of selected texts. 

French 22 - Intermediate French Continued (5-0-5). Winter. 

French 23 - Introduction to Literature (5-0-5). Spring. (Not of- 
fered in 1949.) 
required to furnish his own supplies. 

A survey course with particular emphasis on the nineteenth cen- 
tury. Written and oral reports on collateral readings. 

French 24 -French Classical Drama (5-0-5). Spring. 

Selected plays of Corneille. Moliere and Racine are studied. Four 
plays are read in class and four plays read as collateral. 

French 25 -French Short Stories (5-0-5). Spring. 

German 

German 11 - Elementary German (5-0-5). Fall. 

Drill in fundamentals. Grammar, oral and written practice, early- 
reading of selected material in German. Second part is devoted to 
additional grammar and conversation. 

German 12 - Continuation of German 11 (5-0-5). Winter. 
German 21 -Review Grammar (5-0-5). Spring. 

Spanish 
Spanish 11 — Elementary Spanish (5-0-5). Fall. 



50 ARMSTRONG JUNIOR COLLEGE 

These courses are for the purpose of providing the student with 
the elements of Spanish by reading, ((imposition and speaking 

Spanish 12 - Continuation of Elementary Spanish (5-0-5) . Winter. 

Spanish 20 - R< l u w Course (5-0-5) . Winter. 

A review course in which Spanish 11 and 12 will be covered in 
one quarter. It is designed for those students who have studied the 
language before, but for any reason are not prepared to enter Span- 
ish 21. 

Spanish 21 — Intermediate Spanish (5-0-5). Fall and Spring. 

Grammar review, composition and selected prose readings. 

Spanish 22 — Advanced Spanish (5-0-5). Winter. 

The purpose of this course is to increase the students' facility in 
writing and speaking Spanish. Selected masterpieces of Spanish lit- 
erature are read. 

Spanish 23 — Commercial Spanish (5-0-5). Spring. 

A study of business letters and forms used by the Spanish-speaking 
world and of the vocabulary of trade, travel, and communication. 

Spanish 24 - Modern Prose Readings (5-0-5). Spring. (Not of- 
fered in 1949.) 

This course provides intensive reading of novels, plays and short 
stories of nineteenth and twentieth century Spanish and Latin 
American authors. 



HISTORY 

History 1 1 — History of Western Civilization from the Beginning 
to the Present (3-0-3). Fall, Winter and Spring. 

A survey of the political and cultural history of the Near Eastern 
and European civilization from the earliest times through World 
War II. Special emphasis is given to the Commercial and Industrial 
Revolutions, the rise of political democracy in Europe and America, 
the extension of European culture to Asia and Africa, the conflicts 
of European states, and the recent and contemporary developments 
in the world. 

History 1 2 - Continuation of History 11 (3-0-3). Each quarter. 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 51 

// ttory 13 Continuation of History 12 (3-0-3 , Winter, Spring 
in! Summer. 



History 21 —English History. History of England and the British 
Empire (5-0-5). Fall. 

A study of English political and -<>< i.il institutions from early times 
to the present with special emphasis given to developments since the 

Tudor period. 

History 22 — Latin America (5-0-5). Spring. 

This course deals with the colonial, revolutionary and recent de- 
velopments in the countries of Hispanic America. 

History 23 — Contemporary American History (5-0-5). Spring. 

The purpose of this course is to examine the* major factors in the 
development of the U. S. from the Spanish-American War to the 
present time. Political, social, and cultural issues are examined and 
developments abroad which come into contact with the American 

scene are studied. 

HOME ECONOMICS 

Home Economics 10 - Orientation (3-0-3). Fall. 

An introduction to home economics that gives the student some 
idea of the vocational opportunities in this field so she will be able 
to take better advantage of her course of study in college. 

Home Economics 11 -Clothing (3-6-5). Winter. 

This course deals with the problems in the planning, selecting, 
and purchasing of a wardrobe. It includes an introduction to textile 
construction and finishing and a brief history of clothing. Laboratory 
periods are devoted to the construction of garments. 

Home Economics 12 -Foods (3-6-5). Spring. 

An introduction to the basic foods and family meal service. Com- 
plete meals are prepared and served in each laboratory period. 

Home Economics 13 -Foods (3-6-5). Winter. Prerequisite. Home 
Economics 12 or consent of the instructor. 

A more advanced approach to food preparation and selection. 
Foods arc purchased and prepared for special occasions, such as 
formal dinners, luncheons, receptions and t< 



52 ARM ST R ON G JUNIOR COLLEGE 

Home Economics 21 —Home Famishing (4-2-5). Fall. Prerequi- 
site. Ait 11 or consent of the instructor. 

A study of the home from the standpoint of family needs. Both 
the interior and exterior of the home are considered with reference 
to such topics as home lighting, wall treatments, floor coverings, and 
storage space. Period styles of furniture from those of ancient times 
to the present are studied. 

Home Economics 22 — Nutrition (5-0-5). Spring. Prerequisite, 
Chemistry 11 and 12, or 14 and 15, or consent of the instructor. 

A consideration of the laws governing the food requirements of 
individuals for maintenance and growth of the body. The food nu- 
trients and their contributions to the daily dietary are studied. 

Home Economics 24 —Child Development (3-4-5). Spring. Pre- 
requisite, Psychology 21 or a satisfactory substitute. Four periods 
of supervised observation in the Nursery School. 

A discussion of the social, emotional, physical and mental develop- 
ment of the pre-school child with reference to the behavior and 
guidance of young children. 

HYGIENE 

Hygiene 11 - (3-0-3). Spring. 

Freshman Hygiene should give the student an understanding of 
the principle of mental and physical health. The aim is to educate 
the individual for sensible living in his environment. 

JOURNALISM 

Journalism 11- (1-2-2). Fall. 

This class meets two hours per week for classes on the theory of 
journalism. In lieu of one hour of lecture, two hours of work on the 
staff of one of the college publications may be substituted. Students 
will gain practical experience in working out editorial, mechanical, 
and business problems dealing with a publication. 

Journalism 12 - Continuation of Journalism 11 (1-2-2). Winter. 

Journalism 13 - Continuation of Journalism 12 (1-2-2). Spring. 

LIBRARY SCIENCE 

Library Science 11, 12, 13 (1-0-1). Fall, Winter and Spring. 



COURSE DESCRIPTIO NS 

This course is designed especially for student-assistant librarians 
and includes general training in library science, with emphasis placed 
on current library needs. Enrollment upon approval of instructoi 

M A I IIF.MA TICS 

Mathematics 10 -Intermediate Algebra (5-0-3). Fall and Spring. 

Designed to furnish the student with an insufficient high school 
mathematics foundation with the background necessary for successful 

completion of Mathematics 16, this course includes theory of num- 
bers, factoring, fractions, linear equations, exponents and radicals 
and quadratic equations. 

Mathematics 1 1 - Freshman Mathematics (3-0-3). Fall and Spring. 

An introduction to inductive and deductive methods; Euclidean 
and non-Euclidean systems; theory of arithmetic numbers, opera- 
tions and measurements; functional relationships; and simple circular 

functions. 

Mathematics 12 - Freshman Mathematics (3-0-3). Winter and 
Summer. Prerequisite, Mathematics 11. 

A continuation of the course started in Mathematics 11, variation; 
logarithms: interest and annuities; progressions of numbers; and com- 
binations and probability. 

Mathematics 13 - Freshman Mathematics (3-0-3). Spring and 
Summer. Prerequisite, Mathematics 12. 

Advanced circular functions; equations; and common curves. 

Mathematics 16 — College Algebra (5-0-5). Fall and Spring. Pre- 
requisite, Two years of high school algebra or Mathematics 11. 

A course in advanced algebra planned for mathematics or science 
majors. The course begins with a review of the theory of numbers, 
factoring, fractions, exponents and radicals, linear and quadratic 
equations, and includes the binomial theorem, complex numbers and 
elementary theory of equations. 

Mathematics 17 — Trigonometry (5-0-5). Winter and Summer. 

A course covering logarithms, solution to the right and general 
triangle, the general solutions of trigonometric equations and polar 
coordinates. 



51 



ARMSTRONG JUNIOR COLLEGE 



Mathematics 18 — Plain Analytic Geometry (5-0-5). Spring and 
Summer. Prerequisite, Mathematics 17. 

Analytic geometry of point, line, and circle; elementary conic 
sections: polar coordinates; transcendental curves and transformation 
of coordinates. 

Mathematics 21 -Diff< rential Calculus (5-0-5). Fall. Prerequisite, 
Mathematics 18. 

Theory of differentiation, with application to tangents: maxima 
and minima: rates: curvature; velocity and acceleration: approxi- 
mations: arid Newton's method. 

Mathematics 22 — Integral Calculus (5-0-5). Winter. Prerequisite. 
Mathematics 21. 

Formulas and methods of integration : single integration applied 
to areas and lengths: volumes and surfaces of revolution; centroids 
and moments of inertia: pressure and work. 

Mathematics 23 — Differential and Integral Calculus (5-0-5). 

Spring. Prerequisite, Mathematics 22. 

The law of the mean and indeterminate forms: series, with appli- 
cations; partial and total derivatives, with applications: essentials 
of solid analytic geometry; multiple integration, applied to areas, 
volumes, centroids and moments of inertia. 



PHYSICAL EDUCATION 



Physical Education 1 1M - Conditioning Course for Men (0-3-1). 
Fall. ' 

Consists of calisthenics; stunts and tumbling: lifts and carries; road- 
work, dual combatives; and simple games. 

Physical Education 1 1W - Same Course for Women (0-3-1). Fall. 
Physical Education 12M Team Sports for Men (0-3-1). Winter. 
(onsets of elementary basketball, soccer, or speedball. 
Physical Education l2W — Same Course for Women (0-3-1). Winter. 

Physical Educatoin 1 3 M — Elementary Swimming for Men (0-3-1). 

Spring. 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 



Physical Education 13W — Sarm Corns, foi Women (0-3-1). 
Spring. 

Physical Education 18- Advanced Basketball for Men (0-3-1 . 
Winter. 

Physical Education 21 - Elementary Tennis (0-3-1 . Fall and 
Summei . 

Physical Educatom 22 - Elementary Boxing for Men (0-3-1). 
Winter. 

Physical Education 23 — Senior Life Saving and Instructors 1 Coins, 
in Swimming for Men (0-5-2) .Spring. 

Physical Education 24 - Boxing for Teachers (0-5-2). Winter. 

Physical Education 25 -Folk Rhythms (0-3-1). Fall. 

Physical Education 26 - Modern Dance for Women (0-3-1). 
Winter. 

Physical Education 27 -Tap Dance for Women (0-3-1). Winter. 

Physical Education 28 — Adult Recreative Sports (0-3-1). Spring 
and Summer. 

Consists of passive, semi-active, and active games and sports which 
have carry-over value for later life. 

Physical Education 29 -Folk Rhythms for Teachers (0-5-2). 
PHYSICS 

Physics 10 -Physics Survey (4-3-5). Winter. Laboratory fee, $2.50. 

An elementary study of the fundamentals of physics with a study 
of some of its simple applications. The laboratory- period of two hours 
a week will be devoted to measurements designed to give an intro- 
duction in laboratory- methods. 

Physics 11 -Freshman Physics (5-3-6) . Fall. Laboratory fee, S2.50. 

This course begins with the fundamental measurements of physics 
and includes heat transfer: properties of solids and liquids; gas laws; 
force and motion: simple machines; work and power. 

Physics 12 - Freshman Physics (5-3-6). Winter. Laboratory fee. 
$2.50. Prerequisite, Physics 11. 



56 ARMSTRONG JUNIOR COLLEGE 



A continuation of the sequence started in Physics 11, this course 
includes vectors; torque; momentum; uniform circulai motion: mo- 
ment of inertia: resonance; and the fundamentals of the physics 
of electricity, light, and sound. 

Physics 21 -Mechanics (5-3-6). Fall. Laboratory fee, $2.50. Pre- 
requisites, High School physics or equivalent, and Mathematics 18. 

Physics 21. 22. and 23 together constitute a thorough course in 
basic physics for engineers. The solution of a large number of prob- 
lems is required, and the course includes applications of the elements 
of the calculus. The laboratory work is designed to give practice in 
tin art of making precise measurements, proficiency in the manipu- 
lation of apparatus and added familiarity with some of the concepts 
of physics. The theory of errors is stressed enough to give students 
the ability to decide under what conditions the greater expense of 
more precise measurements is justified. 

Physics 22 -Electricity (3-3-6). Winter. Laboratory fee. $2.50. 
Prerequisites, Mathematics 21 and Physics 21. 

Electricity and related phenomena are taught as a part of the basic 
physics course 1 described under Physics 21. 

Physics 23 — Heat 3 Sound and Light (5-3-6). Spring Laboratory 
fee, S2.50. 

Heat, light, sound and atomic physics are taught as a part of the 
basic physics course described under Physics 21. 



POLITICAL SCIENCE 

Physical Science 12 - Theories of Political Science and Application 
of ///eve Theories (5-0-5). Fall and Spring. 

A study is made of the theory and practice of government and 
politics in the L'nited States. Great Britain. France. Switzerland. 
Russia, and the pre-war Fascist nations. In addition, the workings 
of the United Nations Organization is observed. Each student con- 
centrates on some aspect of the course that particularly interests 
him. and reports his findings to the class. 

Political Sciena 1 3 - Government in the United States (5-0-5). 
Winter and Summer. 

A studv is made- of national, state, and local government in our 
country in actual practice. 



, 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 57 



PSYC HOLOGY 

/' . hology 21 -Introductory Psychology 5-0-5 Fall and Winter. 

An introductory course in psychology, including discussions oi learn- 
ing, memory, behavior, psycho-biological relationships, morale, and 
motivation. The Luis and principles from scientific research in psy- 
chology arc applied to the student in his present use of college 
experien< e. 

Psychology 22-Social Psychology (5-0-5). Winter. Prerequisite, 
ps\< hology 21 . 

This course is an introduction to the psychology of groups. An 
analysis is made of the physiological and socio-cultural motivation 

of the individual from infancy to adulthood from the standpoint of 
his group relationships. Special atcntion is given to a study of leader- 
ship, the development of radical and conservative qualities, propa- 
ganda, war. fascism, communism, delinquency and public opinion. 

Psychology 23 -Child Psychology (5-0-5). Spring. Prerequisite, 
Psychology 2 1 . 

A study of the developmental factors operating in a child's expe- 
rience that make for, or interfere with, effective expression of his 
capacities and efficient adjustment to life situations. Sources are drawn 
from experimental research and from the findings of analytical psy- 
chology. 

Psychology 24 - Educational Psychology (5-0-5). Spring. 

A study of psychological theories of learning and of goals in learn- 
ing as they are represented in various teaching methods used in 
schools, family life and in social changes. 

SOCIOLOGY 

Sociology 20 — Introductory Sociology (5-0-5). Fall. 

A study of the principles of social organization in American culture- 
based on scientific studies of groups, "race", population and of the 
institutionalized functions of society. 

Sociology 21 — Marriage and the Family (5-0-5). Winter and 
Spring. 

A study of family backgrounds, preparation for marriage, marriage 
inter-action and family administration, family economics, problems 
of parenthood, family disorganization. A study of the family in the 
post-war period and present trends in family life are included. 



:»s ARMSTRONG JUNIOR COLLEGE 



S< HOOL Ol M RSING 

Armstrong Junior College offers the following nurses' courses in 
cooperation with the Warren A. Candler School of Nursing: 

Anatomy /A' -Two lecture or recitation periods and one three- 
hour laboratory period. The course runs through two quarters, 01 
may be conducted in one quarter. 1 < < . $2.50 each quarter. 

This couse is conducted concurrently with the course in physiology, 
thus integrating the subject mater. The course includes both gross 
and microscopical anatomy. Lectures, demonstrations and some dis- 
section. 

Physiology /A* -This course is conducted concurrently with the 
course in anatomy. In the integration of the two courses, a basic 
understanding of the functions of the normal human body is pre- 
sented so as to enable the student beter to understand health, nutri- 
tion, and the pathological changes due to disease. The blood group 
of each student is ascertained and recorded. The methods of instruc- 
tion are the same as in anatomy. 

Microbiology IN -Two lecture or recitation periods and one three- 
hour laboratory period. Fee. $2.50. 

The title "microbiology" is used because it is that branch of 
biology that deals with plant and animal forms, while bacteriology 
includes only the micro-organisms of vegetable origin. The charac- 
teristics and activities of micro-organisms and their relation to health 
and disease are studied: also the sources, modes, and prevention of 
infection and isolation; disinfection and asepsis; tissue changes in the 
healing process, infections and neoplasms. Explorations of scientists 
in the field of microbiology and new discoveries applicable to health 
conservation are noted. Lectures, recitations, demonstrations and 
laboratory work. 

Chemistry 13N — Four lecture or recitation periods and one three- 
hour laboratory period. Fee. $2.50. 

The purpose of this course is to acquaint students with the prin- 
ciples of inorganic, organic and physiological chemistry with special 
applications to nursing practice. General composition of blood and 
urine is studied: the students volunteering to eat certain diets which 
show relationship of utilization of foods, and kidney function through 
urinalysis. 

Sociology 2N - This course considers ( 1 ) the principles of sociology; 
(2) the muse as a citizen of the community and as a professional 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 

worker; I the importance of the hospital among the sen ial ag< n< i< 
in (lit- community; 1 the patient in the hospital coming from tin 
t.imiK .Hid returning to the family. Three hours. 

Hotru Economics _\\ —Nutrition and Food Preparation, thre< 
hours. F( e 3 $4.00. 

The fundamental principles of nutrition and food preparation an 
considered. Hie nutrition requirements of children and of adults 
are compared. Special attention is given to the nutrition require- 
ments of childhood and pregnancy. 

Psychology IN — Three hours. 

This course is an introduction to the study of human behavior 
with emphasis on the underlying principles of mental adjustments. 
The importance (A' the nurse's own personality is stressed. 

English IX -Three hours. 

A basic course in the fundamentals of reading, writing, and speaking 

English. 



Evening College 

(Description of courses under separate cover will be furnished 
upon request.) 

Art 122-123 - Pastels and Water Colors. iy 2 quarter hours credit. 

Art 126 — Pencil Sketching. 2 quarter hours credit. 

Biology 111. 112- General Zoology. 5 quarter hours credit each. 

Commerce 101, 102, 103 - Elementary Accounting. 2 quarter hours 
credit each quarter. 

Commera 115 — Business Communications. 3 quarter hours credit. 

Commerce 121. 122, 123 -Advanced Accounting. 2 quarter hours 
credit each quarter. 

Commerce 151. 132. 1 53 - Typewriting. 1 quarter hour credit each 
quarter. 

Commerce 161. 162, 163 -Gregg Shorthand. 2 quarter hours credit 
each quarter. 



60 ARMSTRONG JUNIOR COLLEGE 

Commera 171. 172. 173 Comptometer or Burroughs Calculator. 
1 quarter hour credit each quarter. 

English 121. 122 Survey of World Literature. 5 quarter hours 
i it (lit each quarter. 

English 124- Public Speaking. 3 quarter hour- credit. 

English 126 Basic Journalism. 3 quarter hours credit. 

History 101 A, 101B — History of Western Civilization. 5 quartei 

hours credit each quarter. 

Matin niat'ics 101 -College Algebra. 5 quarter hours credit. 

Physics 101, 102 — Freshman Physics. 5 quarter hours credit each 
quarter. 

Psychology 122 -Social Psychology. 5 quarter hours credit. 

Spanish 101, 102 - Elementary Spanish. 5 quarter hours credit 
each quarter. 

Visual Education 1 - Industrial Relations. Foremanship confer- 
ences. No credit given. 






Roster of Students 



GRADUATES OF 1947 



ASSOC! \ I E IN LIBERAL ARTS 



( r( 01 gia Louise Antonoj)olo 

Donald Evans Austin 

Miriam Andrese Bailey 

K.iilvnn Barker 

Mil \ Anne Barnes 

Marian Beverly Beacham 

William Arthur Binns 

Robert Eason Blake 

Irene Cornelia Branch 

Johnie Ervin Branch, Jr. 

Sara Elizabeth Brewer 

Howard Bernard Brown 

Jane Elizabeth Brown 

William Francis Brunner 

Grace Capetanakis 

Martha Frances Collier 

Mary Elaine Colson 

Pattie Arlene Cook 

Barbara Jane Cordrav 

Barbara Frances Cowan 

Barbara Jane Cox 

Margaret Lorraine Cfovatt 

Helen Jeanette DeVcre 

George Gregory Doerner 

John Harmon DuBois 

Mary Ann DuPont 

Joanne Durrence 

William Mallette Exlev 

Sara Gavin Fawcett 

Theodore Barker FitzSimons, Jr. 

Beverly Jeanne Flanders 

Ruth Connor Foster 

Betty Anne Freeman 

Leolene Gaudry 

Harold Bradley Goldberg 

Lillian Wells Gracen 

Lenora Faye Hancock 

Douglas Eugene Harmon 

Cecile Harris 

Nelson Haslam 

Edna Ann Hutchins 

Natalie Hvmes 



George Howard Isley, Jr. 

Arthur Kearney, Jr. 

Wiley Branch Kessler, Jr. 

Elizabeth Williams Kilroy 

Elsie Gibson Lawing 

Wilbert Nathaniel Little 

Cecil Wilbur Lynn 

James Howard Mallory 

Lois Elizabeth Mallory 

Florrie Lee Malphrus 

Carolvn Eugenia Mitchum 

Mary Ellen Montgomery 

Lida Holloway Moore 

Carolyn Delia Murphy 

Leila Ann Nease 

Marvin Philip Nodvin 

Clara Annette Porterfield 

James Cameron Ratcliffe 

Bernard Israel Ratner 

Robert Lafayette Redmond 

Margaret Angela Ryan 

Frederick Newnan Sigman, Jr. 

Nick Peter Simon 

Frederick Willis Smith 

Leslie Garfield Snead 

Charlie Lee Sparkman 

Thomas Abbott Stokes, Jr. 

Ruth Golden Sullivan 

Eugene Clifford Thompson, Jr. 

Sally Annette Toshach 

Helene Selma Ungar 

George Waring Upchurch 

Tillie Susanne Vaughndorf 

Bettv Juanita Walker 

Marguerite Graham Walker 

Mildred Elizabeth Walsh 

Jane Marie Wheeler 

Charles Michael Arthur Williamson 

Norman Francis Williamson 

James Eugene Wilson 

Sara Anne Woodward 



62 



ARMSTRONG Jl'XIOR COIA.KCE 



\ss<)( [ATES IN HOME ECONOMICS 



II. hi it t Birnbaum 
Mam. in t M.u j B\ lis 
Graa Elizabeth Clark 
Catha Sue Cox 
Sara Leon Dickev 



B< tt\ Lee Forman 

Dorothv Virginia Linton 

Ma\ Ann Smith 

laita Hutchrson Steven* 



PERMANENT DEAN'S LIST OF 
DISTINGUISHED STUDENTS 



Grace Capetanakis 
Edna Ann Hutchins 



GRADUATES 

"A"' Average 



Mary Ellen Montgomery 
Charles Williamson 



B'" Average 



Donald Austin 
Miriam Bailey 
Beverly Beacham 
Johnie Branch 
Barbara Jane Cordray 
Barbara Cowan 
Lorraine Crovatt 
John DuBois 
Theodore FitzSimons, Jr. 
Betty Ann Freeman 
Fave Hancock 
Nelson Haslam 



Elsie Lavving 
Wilbert Little 
Leila Ann Nease 
Marvin Nodvin 
James Ratcliffe 
Fred Smith 
Leslie Snead 
Sally Toshach 
Helene Ungar 
Marguerite Walker 
Norman Williamson 



Phillippa Kandel 
James Kimberlv 



NON-GRADUATES 

" V Average 



Robert Porter 
Helen Quattlebaum 



B' Average 



John Anchors 

Louie Banks 

Edwin Baron 

Joseph Becton 

Norma Faye Blocker 

George Brannen 

John Buttimer 

Robert Cason 

William Ainsworth Clark 

Irwin Cooley 

I), \m -v DeLettre 

Jem DeMara 

Gradv I)icke\ 
Harrv Dodd 



William Farrior 
Anthony Fonts 
Hueh Futrell 
Betty Ruth Graham 
Carter Harrison 
Haskell Heller 
William Horton 
John Howkins 
Cecil Johnson 
Baldwin Kahn 
Mary Ann Kavanaugfa 
Grady Kicklighter 
Charles Lilley 
Harry Livingston 



STUDENT DIRECTORY 



68 



Let McClurc 
Robert Maclaurin 

\shl>\ M.itttu w 

Anne Mayei 
John Mikell 

Bctt) Ann Milli i 

Mary Morel 
Rutus Nightingali 
Sidney Nutting 
Jean Oxenfield 

Leon Pahno 
Mary Patterson 
Betty Pitts 
William Price 

Frank Rizza 



( :.u ol\ n R<>\ < - 
Jo Ryan 
James R\ d< i 
John Stewart 
Wayne Street 
James Teuton 

[.lines Tootle 

Carl Tranberg 
DeLamar Turner 
Ronald Varn 
William Wall 
Robert Way 
William Worrell 
Leon Zalkow 



STUDENT BODY 



SOPHOMORES 



Abbott, Laurie Kimball 
Adams, John Lehman 
Akins, John Oswald 
Alfieris, Costa 
Allen, Lawrence David 
Andrews, Helen Claire 
Bacot, Jules de Romand 
Bailey, Charlotte P. 
Baker, Allie Marion 
Baron, Edwin J. 
Beall, Thomas Keller 
Becton, Charles J. 
Bell, William Lee 
Berry, John Mercer, Jr. 
Blocker, Norma Faye 
Boniface, Robert Edward 
Bourne, Frank Leon, Jr. 
Brannen, George Lorin 
Brigham, Charles Thomas 
Brown, Hugh Richard, Jr. 
Burch, Barbara Claire 
Burgin, Arnold Rush, Jr. 
Burnett, Oscar Caldwell, Jr. 
Butler, William Thomas 
Carroll, William Joseph 
Carter, James Walter- 
Carter. Marian Lourdine 
Cartlidge, George William 
Chandler, Arthur J. 
Chenggis, Andrew Gus 
Clanton, Charles Calvin, Jr. 
Clark, William Ainsworth 
Cobb, Lucious Morrell 
Cohen, Charlton Lee 
Collins, Charles Larry 



Colquitt, Alfred Holt, Jr. 
Cooley, Irwin David 
Cooper, Bernice 
Corcoran, James Frederick 
Corley, Harmon Aloysius, Jr. 
Credle, Kenneth Larry 
Cubbedge, Robert Lee 
Davis, Donald Jeffrey, Jr. 
DcLettre, Dewey Franklin, Jr. 
DeMars, Jean Eloise 
DeVere, Dorothy 
Dickey, Grady Lee 
Dimmick, Robert Phillip 
Dismukes, James Alfred 
Dixon, Jeanne Hoist 
Dupree, Forist Gleaton 
Durrence, Jack Gordon 
Edwards, Ethel Adelia 
Eitel, Charles Henrv, Jr. 
Ellis, Edward Everett, Jr. 
Falk, Richard Bradv 
Farrior, William Laurie, Jr. 
Findlev, James Emory 
Finocchiaro, Frank Joseph 
Fogarty, Margaret Moira 
Fogarty, Thomas Joseph, Jr. 
Fonts, Anthony Victor 
Fountain, Mary Bernardine 
Fretwell, Anne {Catherine 
Fritts, David Hilton 
Fulton, Mary Lillian 
Futrell, Hugh Preston, Jr. 
Galin, Alvin Alex 
Gilbert, Elizabeth Grayson 
Giles, Phyllis Joan 



64 



ARMSTRONG JUNIOR COLLEGE 



SOPHOMORES 



I mi don, Ra\ mond Solomon 

( .i.ih. mi, Brtt\ Ruth 

( incur, 1 1. nold L<-w ifl 

< >i incr, Benjamin Thadeus, Jr, 

i [aag, Baron Ferdinand 

Haddock, John William 
Hale, Charlotte 
Hale, Dm is Elizabeth 
Hall, Colleen Evelyn 

Hamilton, Phillips Dyson 
Hat man, Robert Earl 
Harmon, Walter Carl 
Heller, Haskell M. 
Helmey, Edgar Labey 
Hendrix, Helen Paillette 
Hindman, Benjamin Franklin 
Hodges, Cheatham Eli, Jr. 
Hodges, Eldred 
Hodgkins, Willis Barney 
Holley, Ernest Lee, Jr. 
Holmen, Gustav Torkild 
Hopkins, Emil Eugene 
Hopkins, Marguerite Hayman 
Horton, Homer Sinclair 
Hyrne, John Hume 
Jarrott, George Alston 
Johnson, Cecil Rustin 
Johnson, Charles Pharis 
Jones, Rheta Georgette 
Jones, William Burrell, Jr. 
Joselove, Riette 
Kandel, Phillippa 
Keever, Margaret Lindsay 
Kelly, David O'Leary 
Ketchum, Nelson Amos 
Kicklighter, Gradv Downer 
Kilev, Jack Leon 
Kimberly, James Carlton 
Kitchens, Mack Howard 
Kluber, Harold Francis 
Knieht, Trov R. 
Kuhlke, Betty Janet 
Laird, Marguerite 
Laird, Robert McDonald 
Lamas, Theodore Andrew 
Landy, David 
Lasky, Robert Samuel 
Lee, Edward Henry 
Leonard, Edward Aloysius, Jr. 
Leonard, Elizabeth Lucille 
Lewis, John Cover 
Lewis, Robert Fulton 
Livingston, Harry 
Logan, Joseph Andrew 
Lord, Iverson Hawkins, Jr. 
l.\ nn, James Kenneth 



McCullough, Rov R. 
M< Daniel, William Evans 
McDonald, Rii hard Aloysius 
M. Duffie, Robert P. 

M< Gan ej Wai n n William 
Mi Ghee, Jerry Milfred 
McMillan, Jane Inmam 
M( I eer, Joseph Linwood 
Mallory, Paul Gibson 
Manley, Hobart Leslie, Jr. 
M.n ks, L\ man Wendell 

Maxwell, Josephine Moatte 
Mayer, Anne Floyd 
Mikell, John Shelton 
Miller, Betty Ann 
Mirsky, Zelda 
Mixon, Cameron 
Mooney, Thomas Joseph 
Moore, Betty Adair 
Morel, Mary Ernestine 
Morgan, Harvey Vaughn 
Morris, George Clinton 
Morris, Neal Leonard, Jr. 
Murphy, John Henry 
Newman, John Thomas, Jr. 
Nichols, Nancy Hull 
Nichols, Van Nolan 
Nightingale, Rufus King 
Nutting, Sidnev Thomas, Jr. 
Olson, John, Jr. 
Orsini, Marino Felice 
Paddison, John Robert 
Paine, Hampton Erwin 
Parker, Edward Morton 
Parrish, Jesse Ricks 
Patterson, Mary Alexander 
Paulsen, Jacob Henry- 
Perkins, Ward Ellis 
Persse, Jefferson Davis 
Peters, Hazel Mae 
Pierce, Dorothy Elizabeth 
Pitts, Elizabeth Aline 
Pitts, Paul Zeanus, Jr. 
Porter, Robert Alton 
Price, William Joseph 
Rahn, Henry Osborne 
Reed, William Howard, Jr. 
Reisman, Louis 
Rice, Janice June 
Richard, John Lewis 
Richard, Robert Leonard 
Kit hards, Vernon Glenn 
Richards, Wallace Julian 
Ri//a, Frank Alfonso, Jr. 
Royce, Carolyn Mae 
Ryan, Jo Aiken 



STUDENT DIRECTORY 



66 



SOPHONft >RES 



R\ .in. M.n J \ltuk 

R\ dcr, Jame Donald, Ji . 
Saseen, Joseph ( Hven 
Saxon, Martha Darwin 

S< <>ii. Joseph Franklin 
S( ,i\\ i ight, ( larolyn 
Seckinger, Barbara Ann 

Sih er, Julian ( iraham 

Siinins, Evelyn 

Sims, Archibald William 

Slotin, Harry 

Smith, William Ivie, Jr. 
Snipes, Harry Edison 
Snipes, Rarold Vincent 
Speir, Henry Lee, Jr. 
Stt \ ens, James Emmett, Jr. 
Stewart, Charles LeRoy, Jr 
Stewart. John D. 
Strickland, Harry Brooks 



Sn n kl. mil, Sidney I i anklin 
st i u kland, William Robert 
I ,i\ loi , Louise Remson 

I niton, James L. 
Thomas, Reppaid Dai i is 
Tootle, James Walter 

Turner, D< Lamar, Jr. 

\ .11 n, Ronald Hughl I 
Wade. ( -Iii istine I heresa 
Wallace, William Madison 
Walsh, Verna Lula 
Weathers, Erma Jean 
Webster, Charles Boyd 
William:;, Margaret Ann 
Williamson, Norman Francis 
Wilson, Robert Evans 
Winn, William Stephen 
Yarber, William Clyde 
Zalkow, Leon Harry 



FRESHMEN 



Adler, Sylvia Yetta 
Allen, Ruth Elizabeth 
Allied, John Odell 
Ambrose, Merritt Maynard 
Anderson, Charles Blondell 
Arnold, Hartley Hunt 
Aycock, William Lucious 
Bacon, Carolyn Earleen 
Bacon, William Earl 
Baker, James Thomas 
Banks, Louie Morgan 
Barbot, Daniel Edward 
Barker, Robert Edward 
Barrett, Bert Bailey 
Benet, Robert Laird 
Bergrin, Irwin David 
Berlin, Melvin 
Berry, John Levington 
Blackburn, Frankie Louise 
Blackwelder, Nora Stella 
Blanton, James Clark 
Blatner, Walter Cordray 
Boone, Martha Sue 
Brewer, Nicholas John, Jr. 
Bridger, George Hugo 
Brinson, James Elton, Jr. 
Broderick, Betty Ann 
Brower, Madison Zachary, Jr. 
Brown, George W. 
Browne, Glenn Leslie 
Campbell, Walter E., Jr. 
Cason, Dorothy Jean 
Chambers, Lucy 



Chance, Sam W. 
Chastain, Jesse Maurice 
Clarke, Clifford Montreville 
Clarke, Richard F. 
Clemens, Henry Konrad 
Coffer, J. Henry, Jr. 
Coffev, Nancy Sue 
Colcock, William Huguenin 
Conneff, Laurence Sheridan 
Conway, Harvey Owen 
Conway, Mary Elizabeth 
Cook, Ernest Lawrence 
Coolev, Peter Meldrim, Jr. 
Cooper, Harry Goodwin 
Copeland, William Crovatt 
Crane, William T., Jr. 
Creech, Lynda Dupree 
Crosby, Richard Blake, Jr. 
Daughertv, Sidnev Joseph 
De Beruff, Ellen ' 
Dixon, Elizabeth Hoist 
Donnelly, George Frederick 
Doolan, James Patrick 
Downs, John Kight 
Drane, Robert Gallaton 
Dugger, William 
Dunsmuir, Marian 
Durden, Rose Mary 
East, Charles Preston, Jr. 
Eckles, Edwin Clifford 
Edelbaum, Berko 
Ehrenreich, Sara Frieda 
Ellis, James 



66 



ARMSTRONG JUNIOR COLLEGE 



I RESHMEN 



Epting, Eugene Ludington, Jr. 
Evans, Annie Billcan 

Fallin, Walter Julian 
Ferguson, Reginald N. 
Fishman, Rita 
Floyd, Chai lea Rinaldo 
Fluke, Meyer Oscar 
Fogarty, Anthony Michael 
Fogarty, William Leech 
Folger, John Dalton Murph\ 
Ford, Sarah Lake 
Fountain, Edwin Byrd 
Frazier, Frances Carolyn 
Gay, David Mather 
Gibbons, Norma Monsees 
Gignilliat, Iris Hart 
Godbee, Jo Ann 
Godbold, Gus Sidney 
Graham, Joan Maree 
Green, James Arthur 
Griffin, John Jeremiah 
Gross, Carolyn McNeill 
Guild, Douglas Henry 
Gunn, Robert Donald 
Hanberry, Chester Alexander 
Hancock, Doris Jean 
Hanson, Robert Sterling 
Hardie, Marvin Burke, Jr. 
Harney, William Sumter, Jr. 
Harte, Mary Joseph 
Hattrich, Shirley Jane 
I l.i\ es, Aubrey Luther 
Healey, Joan 
Hecker, Betty Ruth 
Hecker, Robert H., Jr. 
Heller, Rupert S. 
Helmly, Eddie Cleveland, Jr. 
Henderson, Robert Thomas 
Hester, Wendell Hearn 
Hill, Joseph Booker 
Hilt/, Donald J. 
Hodges, Helene DeLorge 
Hodgkins, Edwin Key 
Hoffman, Philip 
Holec, John Francis 
Hopkins, Gibbes Claghorn, Jr. 
Horton, William LeRov 
Hudson, Daniel Curtis 
Hubbard, John Samuel, Jr. 
Jackson, William Edward 
jinks, Herbert Lvnwood 
Johnson, James Marion 
Johnson, Mendel] Thurman 
Johnson, Thomas Chinnis, Jr. 
Jones, George Brooks 
Jones, Shirlex Kline 



Kandel, Joanne I hen la 
K.up, Martin Lind 
Keating, Mary Mullarky 
Kelley, David Branham 
Kellev, John Beryl 
Kelly, Joseph Elton III 

Kellv, Mary Lillis 
Kelly, William Lloyd 
Kerves, Flossie Lillian 
Kimberly, Dora Anne 
Knox, Thomas Joseph 
Kolshorn, Henrv F. C. 
Kramer, Bernard 
Laird, Dorothy Mildred 
Laird, Thaddei^ A. 
Lamb, Robert William 
Lanier, Charles Wellington 
Lanier, Dennis Parker, Jr. 
Lanier, Edwin L. 
Lankenau, Catherine Elizabeth 
Latzak, Thomas Carson 
Leaf, Hunter, Jr. 
Ledbetter, Marianna 
Lexington, Nancy Ann 
Lewis, Robert Evans 
Littlefield, Martha 
Lumlev, Jo Ann 
McCall, William Roval 
McClellan, Dallas Lofton, Jr. 
McCracken, John Joseph 
McCreery, William Flovd 
McGrath, Mary Esther 
Madison, Thomas Clouse 
Magee, Joseph 
Magee, Maurice 
Martin, Nathaniel J. 
Masters, Mary Frances 
Mastopoulos, Emily Florence 
Mathers, John Morrison 
Meadows, Martha Catherine 
Meddin, Arnold Roger 
Meeks, James Marston 
Melaver, Millicent 
Melson, Holland Roberts 
Mitchell, Winifred 
Mixon, Ray Harold, Jr. 
Morgan, Frank Pickett 
Morgan, James Otis, Jr. 
Muirhead, Dolores Onita 
Mullininx, Richard Bordeaux 
Newman, Bobbv Joe 
Nichols, George John 
Nichols, Sarah 
Nichols, Stellgis John 
Nicholson. William J. B.,Jr. 
Norman. Martha Katheiine 



STUDENT DIRECTORY 



I Rl SHMEN 



67 



( )'Hi u ii. I hom. in Keating 
( )glesbee, |.n k I.< w is 
( )gh vh\ , John I nomas 
( hw ns, Jimxnie Mitchell 
Palefsk) . Abram 
P.ii ker, Laui .1 Le< 
Peacock, William W.ill.i, e, Jl 
P'-.n ion, B.11 bai .1 Jcaninc 
Petei s, John Aloyius, Jr. 
Phillips, c lamille Eastei s 
Pi- iv< . ( llesson Ellsworth, Ji 
Powell, Raymond Hovt 
Raines, Richard Mitchell 
Raskin, Annette 
Rich, Eleanor Mai- 
Richardson, Benlah Norma 
Richman. Marilyn 
Ricks, Jack Curtis 
Ridgway, Joseph Thomas 
Robbins, Jack Harry 
Robertson. Michael S. 
Robinson, Barbara Grace 
Rodriguez, Joseph Maria, Jr. 
Rogers, Jesse Richard 
Ropp, June Delores 
Rosenthal, Lois G. 
Rosholt, Andrew McK.ee 
Rotureau, Joseph Lawrence 
Russell, Lorenzo Carroll 
Scott. Joyce Wynelle 
Shepherd. Millard Burton, Jr 
Sieg, Geraldine 
Silver. Murray Mendel 
Sires, Earl W., Jr. 
Skeadas, Catherine Christine 
Slater. Catherine Ingram 
Sluder, Louis B. 
Smith, Elmer Kirby 
Smith, William Roger 
Sojourner, Julia Brabham 
Solana, Laura Jane 
Spillane, Thomas Michael 
Starling, Harold Noel 



Steadman, Mark Sidney 

Stegin, l)oioth\ Ann 

Stelljes, Catherine Rauei 
Sternei . Ross 1 leni j 
Stevenson, George Wellington 
stew .hi. Mai L'.n el Ann 

Stokes. Rob. 1 t Joseph 

Sullivan, Man Cecilia 
Taylor, Lis Marie 
1 1 1 1 ace, Louise C larolyn 
I nomas, Harry Howard, Jr. 
Thompson, Jasper R. 
Thompson, John L. 
'Thurmond, Jefferson G., Jr. 
Tillman, Barney Lee, Jr. 
Tootle, Carolyn 
Tunno, Dean Dunwoody 
Turner, Hubert Francis, Jr. 
Turner, James Edward 
Turner, Jane Elizabeth 
Walden, Edward Act- 
Walker, Arnold Bernard 
Ward, Sam J., Jr. 
Ward, S. Joe, Jr. 
Ware, Robert A 
Warren, Marv Jane 
Wav, Robert Reynall 
Wells, Henry Bradley, Jr. 
Wilder, George Clarence 
Williams, Barbara Louise 
Williams, Lehman William 
Wilson, Charles William 
Wolson, Freddie Alfred 
Wood, Cyrus Steadwell 
Woodcock, Waldo Martin 
Woods, Bettv Lorraine 
Woods, Billy Frank 
Worrell, Pegerv 
Worrill, Cecil Warren 
Worrill, Raymond C. 
Wright. John William 
\\ se, Nolie Belle 
Yarber Stanley ( •. 



EVENING SCHOOL STUDENTS 



Abbott, Laurie Kimball 
Anderson, Earl R. 
Anderson, Frances 
Bacot, Jules 
Becton, Joseph Edward 
Belsinger, Esther R. 
Benton, Daniel W. 
Boniface, Robert E. 
Briscoe, Marian L. 



Briscoe, Robert Edwin. Jr 
Brooks, Henry 
Brooks, Mary R. 
Brown, Mrs. A. K. 
Brown, Norwood 
Bruning. John H. 
Buckheit. Mrs. Fred L. 
Buckshaw, Elizabeth 
Burgess, Benjamin F., Jr. 



68 



ARMSTRONG JUNIOR COLLEGE 



KVKMNC school SI I DKN 1 S 



Byers, ( >lga 

Byeri, William J., Jr. 

c labaniss, Charles W. 
Capetanakil, Grace 
Carter, Clarke L. 
Carter, Mrs. Inez 
Chang, Lie lien 
Chaskin, Mrs. Bea 
Chisholm, E. G. 
Christian, John A., Jr. 
Claghorn, Ermine 
Claghorn, Margaret 
Clark, Elizabeth 
Coats, Rose D. 
Coburn, Annette 
Cohen, Charlton L. 
Cohen, Dena 
Collier, Martha F. 
Cook, John M. 
Cowan, Richard 
Cullens, Zack A. 
Davis, Clennie U. 
deValinger, Jean 
Dodd, Harry- M. 
Edwards, Charles 
Elkan, Mabel B. 
Ellis, Charles R. 
Ellison, Mrs. Minnie 
Fahey, Mary Jane 
Fleming, Louise 
Foran, Juanita 
Foss, Henrietta 
Frazier, Lonnie Jane 
Gillikin, Sidnev J. 
Gillis, Mrs. Vera B. 
Goette, Mary 
Goette, Catherine 
Gordon, Margaret 
Graham, Joan 
Griffeth, Frances Coats 
Groover, Anna 
Harden, Clarence 
Harris, Ce-cile 
Hart, Edgar 
Hayes, Barnita D. 
Hayes, Mrs. G. Carey 
Hinely, Mrs. Maude 
Hitchcock, George D. 
Hodge, A. M. 
Hollingshead, Gladys 
Hollingsworth, Joseph G. 
Holloway, Elizabeth C. 
Hopkins, Roderick 
Jasmire, Mrs. Marv 
Johnson, Herbert P. 
Johnson, Sarah M. 



Johnston, Susil 
Keai ttcy, Eugene K. 

Kinir, Basil L. 
Kulke, Edith 
Lange, Beatrice 
Langford, Doroth\ 
L.myford, Elizabeth 
Linton, Dorothy 
Long, Robert A. 
Lunoe, Mrs. R. R. 
McClelland, Troy 
McLendon, Lois 
McDonald, Lehman 
Madden, Dorothv 
Marsh, Mrs. Herbert 
Martin, Ellen 
Martin, Josephine H 
Meeks, Virginia 
Miller, Donald 
Millett, Howard N. 
Miscally, Louise 
Mitchum, Caroline 
Mitchum, Dale 
Mixon, Mrs. Helen C. 
Morris, Betty 
Morrison, Joseph E. 
Nease, Man- Lee 
Nielsen, Mrs. Dorothy 
Norman, Richard S. 
O'Neal, Mrs. Barbara Gav 
O'Neal, Charles E. 
Osborne, Richard M. 
Pearson, Marv Louise 
Pollock, Edwin Barnett, III 
Reardon, Thomas P. 
Reed, Doris 
Ricks. Connie 
Robbins, Jack Harry 
Robbins, Norman 
Robertson, Edgar 
Roval, Mrs. Margaret 
Ruble, Lenore J. 
Salter, Mrs. Jesse 
Sanders, Mrs. R. B. 
Schaupp, Virginia 
Schreck, Mrs. Essie 
Schreck, Joseph 
Semmes, Bettv K. 
Settle, Frances B. 
Shaw, Horace William 
Shealv, Henrv C. 
Sheridan, Olive S. 
Silver, Julian Graham 
Slotin, Mrs. Louis 
Smith, Richard C, Jr 
Sowell, Marv 






STl'DKN I DIRKCTOKY 



tii) 



! \ i NING S< HOOL SI I l)l.\ I S 



Southwell, Robei I N 
Stevens, Kirs. John I 
rarver, J. W.,Jr. 
I borpe, Sarah M 
Traylor, Henry M. 
rrotman, Robei t B. 
rurner, Mrs. Gloria 
rurner, Morton 
I mil i wood , Mi s. Lucile 
\ aughndorf, Bett\ 

Walker, Lucille 

Ward, Thornton A. 



Webster, Charlei B 
Weinbrecht, John W. 

White, Maie 
Williams, Carolyn 

Williams, Mrs. Helen Stiobhai 
Williams., W. H. 
Willoughbv, Mrs. Agnes 
Willis, Allen N. 
Wolfe, Mrs. John Saxton 
Wooten, Clarence D. 
Wren, Mrs. Lillian S. 
Zabner, Irving 



WARREN A. CANDLER NURSES 



Barfield, Ann 
Blackburn, Virginia 
Buchanan, Annie Nell 
Carter, Cora Jacqueline 
Carter, Dannie 
Cook, Jerry 
DeLoach, Leola 
Harvey, Melba 
Johnson, Jo Anna 
Jones, Barbara 
Kent, Editha 



Long, Hazel 
Reid, Ida 
Shaw, Dorothy 
Spence, Nettie 
Smith, La Verne 
Stewart, Marian Frances 
Tuttle, Jimmie 
Waters, Beulah Ruth 
Warnelle, Marilyn 
Wilson. Gilda 



[NDEX 

Absence! 28 

nting 
Administration •'< 

Admission Procedure 21, 22 

Alumni Officers is. 19 

\i>p!i<<t Arts, Associstt in 

..UK Guidance Centei 10 

Art 
Assemblies 19 

Athletics 16 

Attendance Regulations 29 

Biology 

Bonn! ami Lodging 12, 13 

Calendar, 1948-1949 1 

Certificates Granted 33 

Chemistry 39, 4() 

Cluba 16. is 

College Com mission 3 

Commencement l l 

Commerce 32, 33, 40-44 

Commerce, Associate in 32, 33 

Counseling 21, 27, 2* 

Descriptions 39-59 

Curricula 31-3(5 

List ! 26, 62, 63 

anted . 14.24. 

Dismissal 

Dormitories . 12, 13 

Drama 17, 47, 48, 49 

Dropping a Course 21 

Economics 44 

Education 17 

Employment Opportunities 9, 13, 28 

Endowment 12 

Engineering 33, 44-46 

Engineering, Associate in 33 

English 46, 17 

Enrollment .21, 22, 61-69 

Evening College 13, 59 

Examinations 1, 22, 23 

Experimental Theatre 48 

Extra-Curricula Activities 15-18 

Faculty 3-5 

Fees 25-26 

Foreign Languages 48-50 

French 48, 49 



INDEX (Cont.) 

Paite 
r'r.-shmnn W.-.k 27 

Freshmen, 1947-1948 66-69 

Freshmen, Procedure for 1. 21. 27-'J v 

Geechee !''• l y 

German W 

Grades 23 

Graduation 14. 21 

Graduates. 1947 61 

Guidance 21, 27, 2S 

Guidance Center, Veterans Administration __ 10 

History 50 

History of the College 7 

Holidays 1 

Honor Points 23. 24. 25, 26 

Homecoming 16 

Home Economics 16, 32, 34. 51 

Homo Economics. Associate in 34 

Hygiene 52 

Index 70 

Inkwell 16 

Instructors 3-5 

Intramural Program 15 

Journalism 16, 52 

Laboratories 8, 9 

Liberal Arts __. 35 

Liberal Arts, Associate in 35 

Library 8 

Loans 9 

Mathematics 52, 54 

Mercury 16 

Music . 48 

New Students 21. 27, 28 

Nurses, Courses for 57, 5S 

Nurses. List of Students 69 

Opening Exercises 27 

Organizations, Student 15-18 

Payment of Fees 26, 26 

Paper, School 16 

Physical Education 15, 35. 

Physical Education, Associate in 35 

Physics 55, 5> 

Playhouse, Savannah 17 

Political Science 56 

Psychology 56, 57 

Publications, Student 16 

Re- Admission 25 



INDEX (Cont.) 

Pai 
- 

Ktion 
Regulations, Student 14, 19, 89 

Repoi ta i •■. - 1 - i 

Requiremcnti for Graduation 

Savannah, Playhouse 17 

Scholarships 1" 

Scieni ■• in 

Senate, Studenl 18 

Social Clubs 1G. 1^ 

Sodolofn 57 

Sophomores, 1947-1948 

Spanish .. 49, 50 

Student Conduct 14. 19, 29 

Students. 1946-1947 61-6H 

Summer Term 1 

1 

Theatre 17. 4* 

Transfers From Other institutions 21, 22 

Transfers to Other I nst ltutions 23 

Veterans. Admission of 2- 

Veterans Club 18 

Veterans' Guidance Center 10-1'- 

Withdrawala -'' 






ARMSTRONG COLLEGE 

LIBRARY 



BULLETIN OF 



ARMSTRONG COLLEGE 



1949-1950 



A City Supported College of Savannah, Georgia 




tfe.f 

378.03- 
4735 

V \*h 



Volume XIV 



Number 1 



For Reference 

Not to be taken from this room 



1949 - 1950 



FAIL 



WINTKK 



SPRING 



SI MMKH 



Bulletin of 



Armstrong College 



A Junior College Maintained 
by the City of Savannah 




18311 

Membership In 

American Association of Junior Colleges 

Southern Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools 

Association of Georgia Colleges 



VOLUME XIV 



NUMBER 1 



ARMSTRONG COLLEGE 

LIBRARY 



ACADEMIC CALENDAR 
1949-1950 

FALL QUARTER 

Faculty Workshop September 15-17 

Freshman Week September 19-23 

Registration September 23 

Classes begin September 26 

Mid-term reports due October 28 

Thanksgiving Holidays November 24-27 

Pre-registration December 7-9 

Examinations December 14-17 

Homecoming December 19 

Christmas Holidays December 18-January 1 

WINTER QUARTER 

Registration January 2 

Classes begin January 3 

Mid-term reports due February 3 

Pre-registration March 6-8 

Examinations March 13-16 

SPRING QUARTER 

Registration March 20 

Classes begin March 21 

Mid-term reports due April 21 

Examinations June 5-8 

Sophomore Party June 9 

Sophomore-Alumni Luncheon June 10 

Graduation June 12 

SUMMER QUARTER 

Registration June 19 

Classes begin June 20 

Holiday July 4 

Examinations July 28 



Administration 

THE COLLEGE COMMISSION 

Herschel V. Jenkins Chairman 

William Murphey Vice-Chairman 

Morris Bernstein W. Lee Mingledorff, Jr. Ex officio 

Jack J. Cook, Ex officio G. Phillip Morgan, Sr. 

Olin F. Fulmer, Ex officio Mrs. William F. Robertson 

James P. Houlihan, Ex officio Fred L. Shearouse 
Alfred T. Vick, Ex officio 

THE FACULTY 

Foreman M. Hawes, A.B., M.S President 

Arthur M. Gignilliat, A.B., M.A Registrar 

W. Orson Beecher, A.B., M.A Dean of Students 

Francis M. Brannen, B. S Business Manager 

W. Orson Beecher, A. B. and M.A., Emory University; M. A., Univer- 
sity of Georgia. 

Instructor in History 

Joseph W. Berg, B.S., University of Georgia. 

Instructor in Mathematics and Physics 

Laura Blakeley, B.S. and M.A., Peabody College. 
Instructor in Mathematics 

Francis M. Brannen, B.S. in Chemical Engineering, Georgia School of 
Technology. 

Instructor in Engineering 

R. Clifton Campbell, B.A. and M.A., Emory University. 
Instructor in History and Political Science 

Arthur M. Casper, B.S., Beloit College; M.S., University of Wisconsin. 
Instructor in Physics and Mathematics 

Anna Cone, Associate in Liberal Arts, Armstrong College; B.A., Uni- 
versity of Georgia. 

Secretary to the Dean of Students 



ARMSTRONG COLLEGE 



Anne Crolly, B. A.. li>uline College of New Orleans. 

Assistant Registrar 

L. Ross CUMMINS, B.S.. Yale University: Intern Psychologist. Norwich. 
Conn.. State Hospital. 

Instructor in Psychology 
Director of Community Guidance Center 

Harriet Davis, A.B., University of North Carolina. 

Pu blicity 

Lamar Davis. B.S.. University of South Carolina. 

Instructor in Business Administration 

Lillian Douglas, B.S.. Birmingham-Southern College; M.S., Emory 
University. 

Instructor in Chemistry 

Andrew Doyle, A.B., M.A., Catholic University of America. 
Instructor in Psychology and Sociology 

Eleanor J. Doyle, B.S., Immaculata College: M.A., Catholic University 
of America. 

Instructor in Spanish and Latin American History 

Martha Bozeman Fay, B.A.. Rockford College: M.A. and Ph.D., Uni- 
versity of Illinois. 

Instructor in Biology 

Arthur M. Gignilliat, A.B. and M.A., University of Georgia. 
Instructor in English 

Noma Lee Goodwin,. A.B. and M.A.. Duke University. 
Instructor in English 

Charles E. Howard, B.S.. Troy State Teachers College: M.A.. Peabody 
College for Teachers. 

Instructor in English 

Joseph I. Killorin, A.B., St. Johns College. 
Instructor in History 

Margaret Spencer Lubs. B. Mus., Converse College: A.B.. University 
of Georgia; M.A.. Columbia University. 

Instructor in French 



\1>MI\ISTRATI0N 



Dorothy Morris, B.S., University <>f Tennessee. 

Instructor in Physical Education 

Marjorie A. Mosley, Associate in Finance and Commerce, Armstrong 
College. 

Secretary to President 

Hinckley A. Murphy, B.A., Vanderbilt University. 
Instructor in English 

Josie R. Nelson, Graduate of Banks Secretarial School. 

Bookkeeper 

V. Ennis Pilcher, B.S. and M.S., Emory University. 
Instructor in Physics 

William S. Pollitzer, A.B. and M.A., Emory University. 
Instructor in Biology 

Irvine N. Smith, A.B., and M.A., University of North Carolina. 
Instructor in English 

Nancy Page Smith, B.M., Eastman School of Music of the University 
of Rochester; M.A., University of North Carolina. 
Director of the Glee Club 

Sidney R. Smith, B.S.E.E., Georgia School of Technology; B.S.E.E., 
Columbia University. 

Instructor in Engineering 

Margaret Fortson Stephens, A.B., LL.B. and M.A., University of 
Georgia; Certificate from the Sorbonne, Paris, France. 
Instructor in English 

Mary Strong, A.B., University of West Virginia. 
Instructor in English 

Carlson R. Thomas, B.A., University of Richmond; M.A., University 
of North Carolina. 
Director of Savannah Playhouse - Instructor in Dramatics 

Dorothy M. Thompson, A.B., Monmouth College; M.A., Northwestern 
University; Certificate of Psychiatric Social Work, Western Re- 
serve University. 

Instructor in Psychology and Sociology 

Carmen Torrie, B.S., Concord College; M. S., University of Tennessee. 
Director of Athletics and Instructor in Physical Education 



ARMSTRONG COLLEGE 



Charles B. Vail, B.S., Birmingham-Southern College; M.S., Emory 
University. 

Instructor in Chemistry 

Helen C. Wolf, B.S., Columbia University. 

Instructor in Home Economics 

Helen E. Woodward, A.B., Maryville College; B.S., Peabody College; 
M.A., Vanderbilt University. 

Librarian 

Louis J. Zahn, A.B. and M.A., Emory University. 

Instructor in Spanish and German 

Gladys Nichols Zilch, Diploma from the Gregg School of Chicago. 
Instructor in Commerce 






General Information 

History And Organization 
Armstrong College was founded on May 27, 1935, by the Mayor 
and Aldermen of the City of Savannah to meet a long-felt need for a 
junior college. The first college building was the magnificent home of 
the late George F. Armstrong, a gift to the city from his widow and 
his daughter. The former home, now called the Armstrong Building, 
is an imposing structure of Italian Renaissance architecture; inside, 
its spacious rooms and marble halls lend an air of dignity, while outside 
it is one of the most beautiful college buildings in the South. 

Over the years, through private donation and public appro- 
priation, the campus has been enlarged until now it includes four addi- 
tional buildings: the Lane Building, a gift of the late Mills B. Lane, 
prominent banker; John W. Hunt Memorial Building in which 
are located the Student Center, the Home Economics Department, the 
Women's Lounge, and the Music Room; Herschel V. Jenkins Hall, 
which contains the auditorium, theater for the Savannah Playhouse, 
and classrooms; and Thomas Gamble Hall, site of science lecture 
rooms and laboratories. 

Three of the buildings face forty-acre Forsyth Park, the most 
beautiful park in the city; the other two face Monterey Square, one 
of the carefully planned squares for which Savannah is famous. 

Hodgson Hall, across from Forsyth Park on Whitaker Street, con- 
tains the college library as well as the Library of the Georgia His- 
torical Society, to which Armstrong students have access. 

The college is under the control of a commission of six members, 
appointed by the Mayor. In addition, the commission includes as 
ex-officio members the Mayor, the Chairman of the Chatham County 
Board of Education, the Chairman of the County Commissioners, the 
Superintendent of the Board of Education, and the President of the 
Savannah Chamber of Commerce. 

Except for the war years, enrollment has shown a steady in- 
crease until the present student body numbers approximately five 
hundred. As need arises, the curriculum is enlarged and modified to 
meet new demands. 



ARMSTRONG COLLEGE 



Aims 

The college seeks to serve the community by giving the men and 
women who attend its classes a better understanding of the world in 
which they live and the experience of adapting knowledge to meet the 
obligations and responsibilities of citizenship. 

The student may complete one or more of the following ob- 
jectives: 

1. Receive additional liberal education stressing how to live 
more abundantly; 

2. Complete the freshman and sophomore years of the four- 
year senior college program leading toward the A. B. and 
B. S. degrees. 

3. Finish two years of pre-professional work leading toward 
medicine, dentistry, law, home economics, the ministry 
and other professions. 

4. Graduate from a semi-professional program, prepared to 
go into business or industry. 

The college awards the degree of Associate in Arts to students 
completing an approved program. 



Admission To The College 

(For dates see calendar on page 2) 

A student planning to enter Armstrong should obtain from the 
Registrar an "Application for Admission Card." The student should 
complete this form and return to the Registrar. REQUEST THE HIGH 
SCHOOL PRINCIPAL, OR THE COLLEGE REGISTRAR (in the case 
of a transfer student), TO SEND A TRANSCRIPT OF CREDITS to 
the Registrar, Armstrong College, Savannah, Georgia. 

Having checked the student's records for compliance with the mini- 
mum requirements for admission, the Registrar will send a notice 
to the student that he has been admitted to the college, together with 
certain physical examination forms which must be completed and re- 
turned before the student can complete registration. The applicant will 
be notified of the dates of the next aptitude testing program. These 
tests do not affect a student's entering Armstrong, but will enable the 
counseling staff to assist him in selecting a program of study upon 
entrance. STUDENTS ARE REQUIRED TO TAKE THESE TEST 
MEASUREMENTS BEFORE REGISTRATION. The Registrar wel- 
comes personal interviews with individuals planning to further their 
formal education. 



GENERAL INFORMATION 



Requirements For Admission 
by certificate 

1. A candidate for admission to Armstrong College by certificate 
must be a graduate of an accredited high school w i 1 1 1 sixteen units 
of credit. 

2. No subject-matter units are prescribed. The high school pro- 
gram should be of such nature as to give satisfactory preparation for 
beginning college studies. Subjects which may be expected to contribute 
to this end are English composition, literature, natural science, his- 
tory and other social studies, foreign languages, and mathematics. 
The right is reserved to reject any applicant whose high school program 
does not indicate adequate preparation for college work. 

3. A record of high school credits earned by the applicant should 
be made out on the proper forms by an official of the high school 
and mailed directly to the office of the Registrar. This certificate 
becomes the property of the college and cannot be returned to the 
applicant. 

4. Three units in mathematics and one in physics or its equi- 
valent is pre-requisite for admission to the freshman class in engineering. 



BY EXAMINATION 

Students beyond high school age, who do not meet the above re- 
quirements for admission by certificate, may take the General Educa- 
tional Development tests (high school level) at the local Community 
Guidance Center. The student will be admitted to college on the basis of 
his scores. Entrance examinations should be completed at least one 
week before registration. Additional information may be secured 
from the Registrar. 



ADMISSION TO ADVANCE STANDING 

Advanced credit w 7 ill be allowed for work done in other in- 
stitutions of proper rank and standing and for schools and experiences 
in the Armed Services. Only 10 per cent of the total number of hours 
transferred will be accepted in "D" grades. All work presented for 
advanced standing will be evaluated by the Registrar. To receive a 
diploma from Armstrong College, a student must be in attendance the 
two quarters preceeding graduation, taking a normal load, and, in ad- 
dition, must satisfy the requirements of a particular course of study. 
Adults (students over 21 years of age) may receive credit for certain 
college work on the basis of the General Education Development tests at 
th junior college level. 



10 ARMSTRONG COLLEGE 

ADMISSION OF VETERANS OF WORLD WAR II 

Armstrong College will accept veterans who are not high school 
graduates if their official GED test records in the local Communi- 
ty Guidance Center show scores that indicate the applicant's abili- 
ty to do college work. Many students have attended Armstrong 
under the provisions of Public Laws 16 or 346. Certificates of elegi- 
bility should be secured from the Veterans Administration prior 
to registration. 

ADMISSION OF SPECIAL STUDENTS 

Adults desiring to enroll in courses for their intrinsic value but 
not desiring transfer credit may be enrolled as special students. Re- 
quirements pertaining to entrance examinations, physical examinations 
and physical education courses do not apply to these students. 

Fees 

Tuition will be charged as follows: 

For 12 quarter hours or more 

For Residents of For Other Residents For Non-Residents 
Chatham County Of Georgia Of Georgia 

$50.00 S60.00 $75.00 

For each quarter hour less than 12 quarter hours 
$4.25 $5.00 $6.25 

All veterans must present a certificate of eligibility the first time 
they register at Armstrong College. Veterans once enrolled do not 
require a supplementary certificate unless they have used the G. I. 
Bill since the last quarter thev were registered at the college. STL- 
DENTS WHO REQUIRE A CERTIFICATE BUT HAVE NOT OB- 
TAINED IT PRIOR TO REGISTRATION WILL BE REQUIRED TO 
PAY CASH WHICH MAY BE REFUNDED UPON RECEIPT OF 
CERTIFICATE. 

A student activity fee of $5.00 per quarter will be charged all 
students. This fee will entitle the student to subscriptions to the 
'Geechee and other college publications and the admission to college- 
sponsored dances, the Playhouse and athletic events. 

Students taking laboratory work will be required to pay a fee 
for materials and equipment. This fee is indicated in the description 
of courses found under "Course Descriptions" elsewhere in this bulletin. 



GENERAL INFORMATION 11 

A late registration fee «>f $2.00 f<>r one da) late, $5.00 f«,r two 
days late and §10.00 for three or more days late will !><■ charged any 
student who fails to register and pa) foes on the <la\ designated for 
registration unless he presents a doctor's excuse. In do event will 
the late registration fee exceed $10.00. 

Any student who desires to take more than 18 quarter hours per 
quarter must have the Registrar's approval. 

Anyone wishing to audit a course (but not receive college credit) 
may do so with permission of the instructor by paying a fee of $10.00 
per course. 

A fee of $7.50 will be collected from each candidate for 
graduation tu cover the cost of three invitations, diploma, and rental 
of cap and gown. 

Any student delinquent in the payment of any fee due the col- 
lege will have grade reports and transcripts of records held up, and 
will not be allowed to re-register at the college for a new quarter until 
the delinquency has been removed. 

Each student leaving Armstrong College is entitled to one of- 
ficial transcript of his college work. The charge for additional copies 
is SI. 00 each. Written requests for transcripts are complied with 
promptly when received in the Registrar's office. 



Refunds 

Refunds of fees and tuition will be made ONLY upon written 
application for withdrawal from school. 

Students who formerly withdraw after the first scheduled day 
of registration will be entitled to a refund as per the following schedule: 
One calendar week or less after date 

80% of fees paid for that quarter; 

Between one and two calendar weeks 

60% of fees paid for that quarter; 

Between two and three calendar weeks 

40% of fees paid for that quarter; 

Between three and four calendar weeks 

20% of fees paid for that quarter. 

After four weeks no refunds will be made. 

No refunds will be made to students dropping a course. 



12 ARMSTRONG COLLEGE 

Counseling Staff 

The Counseling Service of Armstrong College, in connection with 
the Office of the Dean of Students, offers help in solving problems 
connected with the student's pursuit of the college program. The 
counselors are regular instructors in the college who have special 
training which enables them to offer individual, confidential, non- 
disciplinary help at the student's own request. 

The help which counselors can give does not in any sense re- 
place or conflict with the help given by individual instructors in their 
courses, from whom students are urged to request help when the 
difficulty is one concerned with the subject itself and having no com- 
plications. The area with which counselors are usually concerned 
are choices of vocation, the planning of work in college, study 
habits generally and pergonal adjustment to college life. These are 
the core-functions of the counseling staff. Those problems which 
do not fit into these general categories either because of greater intensity 
or critical development are referable to community agencies outside 
the college if the student or his guardians so agree. The Counseling 
Staff has advisory capacity to refer cases which give evidence of criti- 
cal need of outside attention after proper consultation with the agencies 
concerned, equal to, but not exceeding, the right of any citizen in 
a like case. 

The main function of the counselor is to help the student work 
out his own problem successfully, and the only administrative func- 
tion which the staff has is to plan with every student in advance of 
registration his work at the college, and, two quarters before the stu- 
dent's graduation, to give, dated, in writing, his formal approval of the 
student's program for graduation. The responsibility for securing 
this approval rests with the student, although the college will send out 
a written notice to the student to consult with a counselor. 



Library 

Hodgson Hall houses not only the library of Armstrong College, 
but also that of the Georgia Historical Society. Since all books are 
on open shelves, students have immediate access to both collections. 
The reading room, which has recently been redecorated, is w T ell lighted, 
most attractive and popular among the students. One section of this 
room is furnished with lounge chairs and opens into a garden, which is 
also an added attraction to many readers. 

The library's holdings consist of a very good collection of stan- 
dard reference books and fiction totaling over 10,000 volumes. There 
are more than 100 periodical subscriptions, including seven newspapers, 
four of which are dailies. 



GENERAL INFORMATION 13 

In addition to the resources of the college Library, Students are 
encouraged to use the Savannah Public Library, which has a good 
reference department and much material of interesl l<> -Indents, in- 
cluding a large collection of fiction, government documents, micro- 
film copies of newspapers, and music records. The main building is on 
Bull Street and has a union catalog, listing the holdings of the Down- 
town branch, Waters Avenue Branch, and of the Georgia Historical 
Society. 

The library is fortunate in being the recipient of an outstanding 
collection of history books, a gift of the late Mayor Thomas Gamble, 
of Savannah. 

Under the supervision of a trained librarian, two full-time assis- 
tants, and eight student assistants, the library is open on certain 
evenings for the use of the night school students, and each school 
day from 8:30 A. M. to 5:30 P. M. 

Community Guidance Center 
In December 1945 the Guidance Center began operation as a 
vocational counseling service under a contract between Armstrong 
College and the Veterans Administration. This contract is one of 
five similar arrangements in the State of Georgia; and it enables 
Armstrong to employ a staff of professionally trained personnel to 
help veterans with their vocational planning problems. By the Spring 
of 1949 approximately 3,800 veterans from a 38-county territory had 
taken advantage of this service, which the federal government pro- 
vides free of charge to all men and women who served in the U. S. 
Armed Forces during World War II. 

The counseling procedure consists mainly of helping clients 
discover or verify their assets and limitations (through testing of 
mental ability, special aptitudes, school achievement, interest pat- 
tern, and personal adjustment), and to relate this information about 
themselves to the "world of work" (through discussion, reading in 
occupational information files, and conference with persons already 
successful in occupations which seem interesting to the client). 

In September 1946 the Guidance Center extended vocational 
counseling service to a limited number of young people and adults 
from the community-at-large on a "private" clinic, fee basis. Arm- 
strong students, as referred by the faculty Counseling Committee, may 
be accepted without charge. At this same time the Guidance Center 
began to function as a psychological diagnostic clinic for children 
sent in by the schools, health and welfare agencies. 

The Center is located in the Lane Building at 20 West Gaston 
Street, with testing and vocational counseling on the ground floor, 
and the Mental Hygiene Clinic occupying half of the main floor. 



14 ARMSTRONG COLLEGE 



Audio-Visual Instruction 

Many of the classrooms of the college are equipped with screens 
for the showing of films, which are used extensively by all of the 
departments. In the teaching of English, foreign languages and music, 
visual aids are supplemented by recordings. 



University Of Georgia Off-Campus Center 

The President of Armstrong College is ex-officio University of 
Georgia representative in Savannah in the operation of the Off-Cam- 
pus Center. The Center is supervised by a full-time director and 
utilizes the college plant. The evening college and work beyond 
the level of the junior college are under the supervision of the Off- 
Campus Center. 



Homecoming and Open House 

Twice each year the college invites the public to visit the campus. 
The week before Christmas, Homecoming is celebrated for all alumni 
and students with a parade in the afternoon, a reception in the evening 
followed by an intercollegiate basketball game and the Christmas 
dance. All alumni, students and their friends are invited to attend. 

During the Spring, the college is open to the general public for 
inspection during its annual Open House. Exhibits are prepared by 
the various departments interpreting the work done in the junior col- 
lege. Those desiring may make tours of the college buildings and 
attend a social hour in the Home Economics Department. 



Student Assistants and Associates 

The college employs each year a number of student associates 
and assistants to work with the faculty. These students find employ- 
ment in the library, science laboratories, business office, and with the 
faculty. Students desiring one of these jobs should apply through the 
department in which he is interested or to the President. 

Scholarships and Loans 

There are a number of scholarships and loans available for stu- 
dents. Application blanks may be secured by a request addressed to 
the President of Armstrong College. Applications for scholarships 
and loans for the school year beginning in September must be on file in 
the President's office by July 15. Applicants will be notified when 
personal interviews are scheduled. 



GENERAL INFORMATION 15 

Placemi nt Service 

The Publicity Director at the college maintains a placement 

service for the benefit of employers and students. Anyone seeking 
part-time employment while in college, or full-time employment after 
leaving college, should place his name on file with this official. 

Commencement Exercises 

Commencement exercises are held once each year in June. At 
this time the degree of Associate in Arts is awarded to those stu- 
dents who have met the requirements for graduation. Recognition is 
given to those students who win scholarships and those who qualify 
for scholastic honors. The Faculty and Graduates participate in full 
academic dress. 

Student Center 

The college does not operate dormitories. The Student Center 
in the Hunt Building is open throughout the college day, affording 
recreation between classes. A snack bar serves hot lunches as well as 
cold snacks. A book store is also operated for the student's convenience. 

Student Activities 

The entire program of extra-curricular activities at the college 
is designed to help develop the whole individual and to assist him in 
becoming an active member of the community. The program comes 
directly under the Dean of Students who is assisted by the Student 
Senate, composed of representatives from each recognized club or group. 
Each student is urged to participate in those activities which appeal 
to his interests or meet his needs. 

Athletics 

The college engages in inter-collegiate basketball. All other 
sports at the college are operated on an intramural basis. Armstrong 
College was the champion of the Georgia Junior College League in 
1948 and a semi-finalist in 1949. 

Intramural Sports 

Intramural teams are organized into a men's league and a women's 
league for competition in certain major sports. At the end of the 
school year the champion in each league is awarded a trophy. 

Social Clubs 

The college recognizes certain groups which are organized to 
foster social life among the students at the college. 



16 ARMSTRONG COLLEGE 

Pre-Professional Clubs 

Some clubs are organized to acquaint students with the ideals 
and objectives of certain professional groups, as in the engineering and 
the science clubs. 



Class Clubs 

These clubs are designed to encourage students to pursue their 
various intellectual interests beyond the instructional activities of the 
classroom, as the French club, psychological-philosophical seminar, 
and others. 



Publications 

The college publishes the Inkwell, a newspaper; the Mercury, a 
magazine; and the 'Geechee, a year book. These afford students 
an opportunity to express their opinions on a wide variety of topics 
and practice in the various journalistic activities. 

Recreation Clubs 

Armstrong is a community college. To fulfill this mission, the 
college extends its activities beyond the student body, inviting all in- 
terested citizens of the community to participate in different recrea- 
tional groups. Oustanding among these is its community playhouse 
whose program is presented in detail below. Other recreation clubs 
are the Glee Club, Film Forum, Great Books Seminar, the Music 
Club and other cultural groups. Members of the community, though 
not registered at the college, who are interested in any of these cul- 
tural activities are invited to participate. 

Savannah Playhouse 

The Savannah Playhouse of Armstrong College is an example of a 
community project sponsored and directed by the college. Local cit- 
izens as well as students may gain here actual experience in acting, de- 
signing, construction, lighting, make-up and all the theater skills that 
make a good production. 

Reactivated in 1947 after a five-year suspension of activity, 
the Playhouse quickly established its reputation as one of the lead- 
ing non-professional theaters in the South with a calendar of five 
dramatic productions playing a total of 28 regular performances. 

Major productions during the last two seasons include My Sister 
Eileen, Winterset, The Importance of Being Ernest, Life With Father, 
Green Grow The Lilacs, Angel Street, and The Taming of The Shrew. 



GENERAL INFORMATION 17 

Students may work with the Playhouse as an extracurricular 
activity or may earn college credit by taking the course listed under 
"Drama. " Try outs for roles in major productions are open to the 
public as well as students. 

During the month of May the Playhouse inaugurated its first 
Drama Festival with a repertoire of three plays, two of which were 
shown each day for an entire week. This festival received nation- 
wide recognition. 



General Regulations 



Counseling 

To help a student "find himself" and select a definite objective 
early in his college program, the counseling staff administers to each 
entering freshman a series of interest, aptitude, and achievement 
tests. In the fall, these are given during Freshman Week and are 
scored prior to the student's interview with the Counselor. On the 
basis of these objective measurements, the student's previous record, 
his interests and his family counsel, the student with the aid of his 
advisor decides on a program of study which will enable him to ac- 
complish his purpose. 



Physical Examinations 

All regular students are required to enroll for courses in physical 
education. Each student must submit a completed physical examina- 
tion report on the forms furnished by the college before he can com- 
plete his registration. On the basis of the examinations, the physical 
education department will adapt a program of training suited to 
individual requirements. 



Course Load 

The unit of work for a regular student is 15-18 quarter hours 
per quarter. A nominal schedule of sixteen quarter hours presupposes 
that the average student will devote approximately forty-eight hours 
per week to his college classes and to his preparation therefor. 

Permission to enroll for more than 18 quarter hours will be 
granted by the Registrar when curricuiar requirements make such 
action necessary, or when evidence as to the capacity of the student 
seems to justify that the privilege be granted. 

Should a student's work load fall below the normal schedule, 
the student's parent or guardian (in case of veterans attending school 
under Public Law 16 and 346, the Veterans Administration) will be 
notified. 

Admission To Class 

Students will be admitted to class when the instructor is furnished 
by the Registrar an official class card indicating that he has completed 
his registration and paid his fees in the Business Office. 



GENERAL REGULATIONS 19 

Conduct 

Armstrong students arc expected to conduct themselves a> ladies 
and gentlemen. Compliance with the Commission and faculty regula- 
tions is assumed. The use on the campus of intoxicating beverages. 
gambling, and hazing arc prohibited. The faculty approved the rec- 
ommendation of the Student Senate for consideration and handling of 
honor infractions in class work. This provision and other instructions 
contained in the Armstrong Handbook are official regulations. 

Reports And Grades 

It is felt by Armstrong College that students in college should 
be held accountable for their own scholarship. Accordingly, report 
cards, warnings of deficient scholarship and other such notices are 
not sent out to parents or guardians by the college except by request. 
Instead the students themselves receive these reports and are expected 
to contact the counseling staff whenever their work is unsatisfactory. 
Report cards are issued at the end of each quarter. Reports of failing 
grades are issued in the middle of each quarter. Each student has access 
to the counseling staff, made up of the faculty members for purposes 
of advisement; and in addition, the Registrar, Dean of Students, and 
all instructors are available to help and advise any student seeking 
assistance. 

Reports are based on the following system of grading: 

4 honor points per quarter hour 
3 honor points per quarter hour 
2 honor points per quarter hour 
1 honor point per quarter hour 
No honor points per quarter hour 

Conditions must be removed be- 
fore mid-terms of the following 
quarter 

Course must be repeated 

Course must be repeated 

Course must be repeated 

may be removed by means stipu- 
lated by the instructor of the course in which the student received 
the grade "E". An "E" not removed by the mid-term of the succeeding 
quarter automatically becomes an "F". If a course in which an "E" 
grade was received is repeated an "F" will be entered in the place of 
the "E" for the first time the course was taken. 



A plus 


Exceptional 


A 


Excellent 


B 


Good 


C 


Fair 


D 


Poor 


E 


Conditional 




Failure 


F 


Failure 


W 


Withdrew 


W-F 


Withdrew' Failing 


An "E" (conditional failure) 



20 ARMSTRONG COLLEGE 

Honors 

Students who have been in attendance for three consecutive 
quarters taking a normal load and have achieved an average of "B"' or 
better with DO grades below that of "C" will be placed on a Perman- 
ent Dean's List in a book for that purpose kept in the office of the 
President. This list is published each June in the commencement 
program. 

Graduates who meet the requirements for the Permanent Dean's 
List and who are graduating with an average of three honor points 
per quarter hour, will be designated as graduating summa cum laude 
(with highest distinction). The designation cum laude (with dis- 
tinction) will be bestowed upon those meeting the above require- 
ments with an average of two honor points per quarter hour. 

A valedictorian will be selected by the graduating class from 
among the five students with the highest scholastic averages in the 
work completed before the term in which the students graduate. 

Students who make a grade of "B" or better in each course dur- 
ing any quarter will be placed on the Dean's Scholastic Attainment 
List. 



Attendance 

Students are expected to attend classes as scheduled. Any 
absence, whatsoever, from class work entails a loss to the student. 

A student will be automatically dropped from a course when he 
has been absent from class, for whatever cause, a number of times 
equal to one-third of the times the class is scheduled to meet during 
the quarter. 

Students are required to attend the college's bi-weekly assemblies. 
Official announcements are made at these meetings. 



Withdrawals 

A formal withdrawal, presented to the Registrar in writing, is 
a prerequisite for honorable dismissal from, or re-entrance into, this 
institution. Any student planning to withdraw should immediate- 
ly make such intentions known to the administration of the school in 
writing. This notice is required to receive any authorized refunds. 

In order that a student may not receive a failing grade on his 
permanent record in the Registrar's office, he should make formal 
withdrawal from any class which he stops attending. The instructor's 
approval should be brought to the Registrar's office in writing. 



GENERAL REGULATIONS 21 

Students will receive i prejudicial grade in a five-hour course 
dropped after the seeond week or in a three-hour course dropped 
after the third week of a quarter unless there are extenuating cir- 
cumstances approved b\ die instructor. 

Dismissals and Permission To Re-Register 

Any student failing (except in cases excused before examinations 
on account of illness) to pass at least one course other than physical 
education in any one quarter will be dropped from the rolls of the 
college. Any student who fails to make an average of at least 0.6 
honor points per quarter hour in all work scheduled during the first 
three quarters work at the college will not be allowed to re-register. 
Withdrawal is recommended to all students who have less than "C" 
average at the end of the fourth quarter of college work. At the end of 
the sixth quarter's work a student must have 0.8 honor points per 
quarter hour in all work scheduled in order to re-register. 

The honor point average is computed by dividing the total num- 
ber of honor points which a student has earned by the total number 
of hours of class work for which he has registered, omitting only the 
courses in which the grade of "W" was received. 

Graduation 

In order to graduate, a student must complete with a "C" average 
a program of study consisting of approximately 100 hours which 
has been approved by a member of the counseling staff. Students 
lacking 10 quarter hours or less for graduation may complete these 
hours at an accredited senior college and receive a diploma from 
Armstrong College upon application, furnishing the college with a 
transcript of the completed work. 

At least two quarters prior to expected graduation, a student should 
make application in the Registrar's office to be considered a candi- 
date. 

Recommendations 

The recommendations issued by the college are written in terms 
of the grades the student earns, and what his teachers think of him as 
expressed by them on a student rating form. These reports are part 
of his permanent record. 

The records of the Registrar's office are consulted regularly by 
representatives of the Federal Bureau of Investigation, the Civil Service, 
the local Credit Bureau and other agencies having access to con- 
fidential records. These records are of vital importance to the stu- 
dent. 



Curricula 



GENERAL 

PLAN A PROGRAM OF STUDY WITH THE COUNSELING 
STAFF. Even if a student knows what studies are required of him 
to graduate he should have on record in the Dean of Students' office 
a record of his program. 

The Associate in Arts degree is conferred upon all students who 
complete at Armstrong College a program of study agreed upon by the 
student in consultation with a counselor. It is expected some students 
will want to change their objectives. The college desires to help 
them "find themselves". Should a student change the objective 
for which he originally planned his program of study, he should see 
his counselor and discuss with him his new objective. This pro- 
gram of study can not be materially changed during the two quarters 
prior to the expected graduation date. 

After a full discussion and consideration of his interests and 
qualifications with parents and friends who can help him, and after in- 
terviews with members of the faculty and the counseling staff, the 
student should decide what he is going to stifdy. Especially trained 
personnel, comprising the counseling staff, will make an appoint- 
ment with the student before he completes registration. Together 
with his counselor, the student will work out a tentative list of the 
subjects to be taken during each of the quarters he plans to be at 
Armstrong. This list will be kept for future reference so that he may 
build his program each quarter with a definite goal in mind. 

If the student changes his objective and wishes to change his 
program of study, he will report this fact to the counseling staff. 

If completion of his training involves going to another school after 
he leaves Armstrong, the following steps are urgent: 

Secure the college's catalog and see what courses must be 
completed at Armstrong College to meet the degree require- 
ments at the senior college; 

Schedule the prerequisites for the courses to be taken later; 
Make a list of the subjects to be taken at Armstrong College 
for each of the quarters before transferring, and be sure it 
includes all of the courses required for the junior class 
standing, if possible. 

The curricula hereafter outlined are suggestive only. They may 
be materially changed by the student in conference with his ad- 
visor, who will assist him to build a course of study upon his own in- 



CI RRIC1 LA 



terests, abilities and previous trailing in the light of his chosen 
objective. 

Subjects listed from 10 through 19, indicate work that is usually 
taken in the freshman \ ear and from 20 through 29, subjects rec- 
ommended for study in the sophomore year. 



The Core Curriculum 

There are certain bodies of knowledge and certain skills in- 
dispensable to every college trained man and woman. The under- 
standing of ones environment and man's struggle to adapt it to useful 
ends; the ability to communicate his thoughts and feelings; right 
group-attitudes and coordinated physical activity — these objectives 
are set up in the following courses required of all students desiring 
to graduate from the college. An equivalent course taken at another 
institution is acceptable. 

Freshman year: English 11-12-13; History 11-12-13; ten quarter 
hours of a laboratory science, and three quarters of physical edu- 
cation. 

Sophomore year: English 21-22-23 and three quarters of phy- 
sical education. 

Students graduating in less than the six quarters of the regular 
session should ask their counselor to qualify their physical education re- 
quirements accordingly. Physical Education should be taken in the 
proper sequence and two courses should not be scheduled in any one 
quarter. 



Associate In Arts 
concentration-general terminal 

Many students will not continue their formal education after 
leaving Armstrong. To these students the college gives the oppor- 
tunity to select either those subjects which are liberal in nature, 
giving one a better understanding of himself and his enviornment; 
or those subjects which have a vocational value; or a combination 
of both. Including the core curriculum, the student will complete 
100 hours from the following suggested fields: 

Commerce Foreign Languages Science 

English Home Economics Social Studies 

Fine Arts Mathematics 



24 ARMSTRONG COLLEGE 

Associate In Arts 

CONCENTRATION-COMMERCE SECRETARIAL TERMINAL 

This program is designed to meet the needs of those students who 
wish to qualify for clerical positions in business. Including the core 
curriculum, the student will complete 100 hours from the following 
suggested fields: 

Accounting Calculating Machines Typing 

Business Communications Office Practice Electives 

Business Law Shorthand 

Associate In Arts 
concentration-commerce and senior college preparatory 

business administration 

Many students will wish to continue their business studies in a 
senior college. Including the core curriculum, these students select 
100 hours from the following subjects: 

Accounting Foreign Languages Political Science 

Commerce Mathematics Psychology 

Economics Natural Sciences Electives 

Associate In Arts 
concentration-home economics senior college preparatory 

The vocational opportunities in this field are numerous. Pre- 
paration for marriage and personality development are other objec- 
tives in some of the Home Economics courses. Including the core 
curriculum, the student will complete 100 hours from the following 
courses : 

Art Foods Orientation 

Basic Mathematics Home Furnishings Psychology 

Child Psychology Natural Sciences Sociology 

Clothing Nutrition Electives 

Associate In Arts 
concentration-liberal arts senior college preparatory 

This program is recommended for candidates for an A. B. degree, 
pre-law, pre-ministerial, journalism, and other pre-professional con- 
centrations. Including the core curriculum, the student will complete 
100 hours from the following areas of study: 

Economics History Sociology 

English Natural Sciences Electives 

Fine Arts Political Science 

Foreign Languages Psychology 



CURRICULA 



Associate In Arts 

CONCENTRATION-SCIENCE SENIOR COLLEGE PREPARATORY 

This program is recommended for candidates for the B. S. degree, 
pre-medical, pre-dental and pre-veterinary medicine students and lab- 
oratory technicians. Including the core curriculum, the student will 
complete 100 hours from the following: 

Biology Mathematics Electtvefl 

Chemistry Physics 

Foreign Languages Social Studies 

Associate In Arts 
concentration-engineering senior college preparatory 

This program should be varied for certain fields such as chemical, 
electrical, etc. The student should obtain a catalog from the senior 
college he plans to attend and have his counselor check his program 
with him against the catalog. While ALL of the subjects required in 
the freshman and sophomore years in some engineering courses can- 
not be offered at Armstrong College, the student can spend profitably 
two years studying for his bachelor's degree in engineering. The 
counselors will advise you. 

Chemistry Mathematics Social Studies 

Engineering Physical Education 

English Physics 

One-Year Stenographic Course 

A letter certifying proficiency in secretarial courses will be awarded 
students completing the one-year stenographic course. A student 
who knows he has only one year to attend college may herein master 
the tools that will better enable him to earn a livelihood. 

Accounting Physical Education Electives 

Business Correspondence Shorthand 
Office Practice Typing 



Course Descriptions 

General 

Armstrong College reserves the right to (1) withdraw any course 
for which less than ten students register, (2) limit the enrollment 
in any course or class section, (3) fix the time of meeting of all classes 
and sections, and (4) offer such additional courses as demand and 
staff personnel warrant. 

No credit will be given in beginning courses in commerce and 
languages where the same or similar courses have been presented 
for admission from high school. 

Where two or more courses are listed under one description, 
no credit for graduation will be given until the sequence is com- 
pleted. 

After each course, the first number listed is the number of hours 
of lecture; the second, the number of hours of laboratory and the 
third, the number of hours of quarter-hour credit the course carries; 
e.g. (3-3-4) means 3 hours of class, 3 hours of laboratory, 4 quarter 
hours of credit. 

ARTS 
(See Fine Arts) 

BIOLOGY 

Biology 11 - General Zoology (3-4-5). Fall and Winter. Labora- 
tory fee, $3.50. 

Introduction to animal structure and function using a vertebrate for 
most of the laboratory work. 

Biology 12 - General Zoology (3-4-5). Winter and Spring. Labora- 
tory fee, S3. 50. Prerequisite: Biology 11. 

Principles of Evolution and Genetics, and survey of the inverte- 
brate phyla. Laboratory work on invertebrates. 

Biology 22 - Invertebrate Zoology (3-6-6). Spring. Laboratory fee, 
$5.00 Prerequisite: Biology 11 and 12. 

A study of the structure and function of invertebrates. Field trips 
for studying animals and their natural habitats will be included. 

Biololgy 23 - Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy (3-6-6). Fall. Lab- 
oratory fee, $5.00. Prerequisite: Biology 11 and 12. 

A study of the anatomy and evolution of the organ systems of the 
vertebrates. 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 27 

CHEMISTRY 

Chemistry 14-15 - General Chemistry (5-3-6). Fall and Winter. 
Laboratory fee, 13.50. Prerequisite: two years of high school mathe- 
matics. 

This is the course in general descriptive chemistry. It will meet 
the freshman requirements of engineering, science and pre-medical 
students. The fundamental laws of chemistry and some elements and 
their compounds are studied. 

Chemistry 24 - Qualitative Analysis (3-6-6). Fall 19 \ ( ) only and 
Spring. Laboratory fee, 85.00. Prerequisite: Chemistry 15, Mathe- 
matics 16-17. 

The lectures include a study of the theoretical and fundamental 
principles of the subject, as well as a thorough study of the reactions 
of the more important ions. The laboratory work includes the system- 
atic analysis for both anions and cations by a semi-micro scheme. 

Chemistry 25 - Quantitative Analysis (3-6-6). Winter. Labora- 
tory fee, $5.00. Prerequisite: Chemistry 24. 

This is an elementary course in quantitative analysis. 

Chemistry 26 - Quantitative Analysis (2-8-6). Spring. Labora- 
tory fee, $5.00. Prerequisite: Chemistry 25. 

This is a more advanced course in quantitative analysis with em- 
phasis on gravimetric and instrumental methods of analysis. 

Chemistry 28 - Industrial Chemistry Survey (2-3-3). Spring. 
Not offered in 1950. Laboratory fee, 83.00. Prerequisite: Chem- 
istry 15. 

This is an elementary course in the industrial application of chemis- 
try. The topics studied will be followed by inspection trips to ap- 
propriate local industries wherever possible. These trips will con- 
stitute the laboratory. Liberal use will be made of scientific films. 



COMMERCE 

Commerce lla-b - Beginning Typing (0-5-2). Fall and Winter. 
Laboratory fee, $3.50. 

This course consists of introductory instruction in the technical 
features and care of the machine, position, fingering, proper tech- 
nique and mastery of the keyboard. An average speed of 40 words 
a minute is attained at the end of the second course. 



28 ARMSTRONG COLLEGE 

Commerce lie - Intermediate Typing (0-5-2). Spring. Laboratory 
fee, S3. 50. Prerequisite: Commerce lla-b or equivalent. 

A typewriter course in which emphasis is placed on speed build- 
ing and accuracy. Special typing problems such as business letters, 
minutes, notices, stencil cutting and carbon copies are stressed. 

Commerce 12 a-b • Beginning Shorthand (5-0-5). Fall and Win- 
ter. 

Complete theory of Gregg Shorthand in the Manual. Additional 
reading and dictation given from the Speed Studies. 

Commerce 12 c • Intermediate Shorthand (5-0-5). Spring. 

Dictation and transcription of new and studied material. Student 
is required to take dictation at the rate of eighty words a minute. 

Commerce 13a - Burroughs Calculator and Comptometer (0-5-2). 
Fall. Laboratory fee, S3. 50. 

The objective of this course is to build speed and accuracy in the 
operation of the Burroughs Calculator and Comptometer and a 
thorough review of business mathematics. This quarter is devoted 
to the operation of the four fundamentals in arithmetic or the cal- 
culator. 

Commerce 136 - Burroughs Calculator and Comptometer (0-5-2). 
Winter. Laboratory fee, S3. 50. 

The following business mathematics are reviewed and applied on the 
machine during this quarter: decimal equivalents, split divisions, in- 
voicing over the fixed decimal, percentages, discounts, and chain dis- 
counts, costs, selling price and rate of profit. 

Commerce 13c - Burroughs Calculator and Comptometer (0-5-2). 
Spring. Laboratory fee, $3.50. 

The third quarter is a continuation of business problems on the 
machine. The transactions covered are reciprocals, figuring grain, 
cipher, division, prorating cost and expenses, gross and dozen in in- 
voicing inventories. 

. Commerce 15 - Business Communications (3-0-3). Winter. 

A study of business correspondence, letters, information reports, fol- 
low-up sales programs, statistical analysis and inter-office com- 
munications. Stress is placed on the mastery of fundamentals of 
clear writing. 






COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 29 

Commerce 17 - Office Practice (5-0-5), Spring. 

Typical business office situations arc duplicated as nearly as possible. 
Practical problems deal with dictation and transcription, typing, opera- 
tion of the mimeograph, filing; and offiee courtesy. 

Commerce 1 ( ) - Modern business Mathematics (3-0-3). Spring. 
Prerequisite: Mathematics 11-12 or its equavilent. 

This course gives that background necessary for dealing with prob- 
lems found in banking, real estate, financing, and accounting; the 
operation of the compound-interest law in business; simple prob- 
lems concerning bonds, sinking funds, valuation of properties, an- 
nuities, and insurance. Practical problems in these fields will be em- 
phasized. The necessary aids and shortcuts with use of tables and 
logarithms will be studied. 

Commerce 21a - Advanced Typing (0-5-2). Fall. Laboratory fee, 
S3. 50. Prerequisite: Commerce lie or equivalent. 

Advanced typing is a course in the acquisition of speed and ac- 
curacy including various legal forms and papers, manuscripts and 
business papers. An average of 65 words a minute is attained. 

Commerce 216 - A continuation of Commerce 21a - (0-5-2). Win- 
ter. Laboratory fee, $3.50. 

Commerce 21c - A continuation of Commerce 216 - (0-5-2). Spring. 
Laboratory fee, S3. 50. 

Commerce 22a - Advanced Stenography (5-0-5). Fall. Prere- 
quisite: Commerce 12a, b, c. 

A course in which the principles of Gregg Shorthand are applied 
in developing skill and accuracy in writing shorthand and in trans- 
cribing. The first half year is devoted to dictation of general business 
material; the second half, to dictation material applying to 16 major 
vocations. A speed of 120 words a minute for 5 minutes is required. 

Commerce 226 - A continuation of Commerce 22a (5-0-5). Winter. 

Commerce 22c - A continuation of Commerce 226 (5-0-5). Spring. 

Commerce 23a - Advanced Calculator and Comptometer (0-5-2). 
Fall. Laboratory fee, $3.50. 

The next two quarters are devoted to the application of the machine 
and business mathematics to the following businesses: drugs, hard- 
ware, electrical, plumbing, contracting, wholesale paper, pay roll, 



30 ARMSTRONG COLLEGE 

packing house, creameries and dairies, laundries, steel and iron, de- 
partment stores, banks, lumber, petroleum, railroads. 

Commerce 236 - A continuation of Commerce 23a (0-5-2). Winter. 
Laboratory fee, $3.50. 

Commerce 23c - Advanced Calculator and Comptometer (0-5-2). 
Spring. Laboratory fee, S3. 50. 

Speed, skill and accuracy in the operation of the machine are stressed 
in this last period. 

Commerce 24 - Principles of Accounting, Introductory (5-2-5). 
Fall and Spring. 

An introduction to the fundamental principles and procedures of ac- 
counting, including a study of the journal, the ledger, accounting state- 
ments, controling accounts, special journals and the accounting system. 
Supervised study in laboratory, two hours per week. 

Commerce 25 - Principles of Accounting, Introductory (5-2-5). Fall 
and Winter. Prerequisite: Commerce 24. 

An application of accounting principles to certain problems such 
as the proprietorship, the partnership, the corporation, departmen- 
tal operations, manufacturing accounts and the analysis of account- 
ing statements. Supervised study in laboratory, two hours per week. 

Commerce 26 - Principles of Accounting, Intermediate (5-0-5). 
Winter and Spring. Prerequisite: Commerce 25. 

Basic accounting theory with emphasis on the various forms of 
business organization, assets, liabilities and reserves. 

Commerce 27 - Business Law (5-0-5). Winter. 

Contracts: offer and acceptance, consideration, performance, rights of 
third parties and discharge. Agency: creation of an agency, powers, 
liabilities of principal and agent. Negotiable instruments: elements of 
negotiability, endorsements, and transfer, liabilities of parties, discharge, 

Commerce 28 - Business Law (5-0-5). Spring. Prerequisite: Com- 
merce 27. 

Partnership: formation, powers, liabilities of partners, termination. 
Corporation: formation, powers, rights of security holders, types of 
securities. Sales: vesting of title, warrants, remedies. 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 31 

ECONOMICS 

Economics 21 - Principles of Economics (5-0-5). Fall and Slimmer. 

\ stud) of the principles behind tin* economic institutions of the 
present time and an examination of some of the economic problems 

in the modern world. 

Economics 21 - Problems of Economics (5-0-5). Spring. Pre- 
quisite: Economics 21. 

A study of economic problems based upon the principles studied 
in Economics 21. 

ENGINEERING 

Engineering 11 - Engineering Drawing (0-6-3). Fall and Spring. 
Topics of study include lettering, the use of the instruments, ortho- 
graphic projection, auxiliary views, section. 

Engineering 12 - Engineering Drawing (0-6-3). Winter. Prere 
quisite: Engineering 11. 

Topics of study include sections, dimensions, limit dimensions, pictor- 
ial representation, threads, and fastenings, shop processes, technical, 
sketching, working drawings, pencil tracing on paper, reproduction 
processes. 

Engineering 13 - Engineering Drawing (0-6-3). Spring. Prere- 
quisite: Engineering 12. 

Topics of study include technical sketching of piping and fittings, 
working drawings, ink tracing on cloth, working drawings from as- 
semblies and assemblies from working drawings. 

Engineering 21 - Descriptive Geometry (0-3-1). Fall. Prerequisite: 
Engineering 11. 

Topics of study include the solution of problems involving points, lines 
and planes by auxiliary view methods. Practical applications are em- 
phasized. 

Engineering 22 - Descriptive Geometry (0-3-1). Winter. 

A continuation of subjects studied in Engineering 21 including solu- 
tions by rotation methods, simple intersections, the development of 
surfaces. 

Engineering 23 - Descriptive Geometry (0-3-1). Spring. 
Topics studied include the intersection of surfaces; warped surfaces. 
Practical applications are emphasized. 



32 ARMSTRONG COLLEGE 

Engineering 25 - Elements of Electrical Engineering (2-3-3). Spring. 
Prerequisites: Physics 22. 

Fundamental theory of electric, magnetic, and electro-static circuits. 

Engineering 26 - Plane Surveying (1-3-2). Fall and Spring. 

Theory of practice in chaining, differential and profile leveling, 
traversing, topographic surveying, reduction and plotting of field notes 
and mapping. 

ENGLISH 

English 11 - Freshman English (3-0-3). Fall and Spring. 

This course covers a review of punctuation and the fundamentals of 
grammar, theme writing, and vocabulary building. Also the student reads 
and discusses selections from the works of the most prominent literary 
figures of the Western World. 

English 12 - Continuation of English 11 - (3-0-3). Fall, Winter and 
Summer. 

English 13 - Continuation of English 12 - (3-0-3) . Winter, Spring and 
Summer. 

In English 11-12-13 selections from the works of the following 
authors will be read: Homer, Sophocles, Chaucer, Montaigne, Cellini, 
Voltaire, Checkov, Hardy, as well as those of certain English Romantic 
poets. 

English 21 - Survey of World Literature (3-0-3). Fall and Spring. 

This course is designed to give the student a knowledge of the prin- 
cipal works of certain major writers. The student reads in some detail 
several hundred pages from the works of selected authors whose thought 
or style has been of world-wide significance. The last third of the 
course deals with modern trends in literature and thought. At intervals, 
students are asked to write papers, and emphasis is constantly placed 
on the improvement of the student's ability to express himself. 

English 22 - Continuation of English 21 - (3-0-3). Fall, Winter and 
Summer. 

English 23 - Continuation of English 22 - (3-0-3). Winter, Spring 
and Summer. 

In English 21-22-23 selections from the works of the following au- 
thors will be read: Shakespeare, Milton, Goethe, Keats, Whitman, 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 33 

Ibsen; also selections from the Bible. The last quarter will be devoted 
to a consideration of representative works of contemporary writers in 

England and America. 

English 24 - An Introduction to Poetry (3-0-3). Winter. 

A study of the various types and forms of poetry with special em- 
phasis on the works of the more recent British and American poets. 

English 25 - American Literature (5-0-5). Spring. 

A survey of American literature and culture. In this course the 
student reads somewhat fully from works of a comparatively small 
number of notable and representative American writers. This course is 
primarily devoted to reading and discussion, but each student is asked 
also to select one particular period or author for concentration, mak- 
ing reports and writing papers in that phase of the work. 

English 26a - Advanced Composition (3-0-3). Fall. Not offered 
in 1949. 

Advanced writing practices. The course is designed to equip 
the student to express his ideas in clear, well-organized and interesting 
prose. Various techniques of composition are considered, but the main 
portion of the course is devoted to the writing and re-writing of ex- 
position. 

English 266 - Continuation of English 26a (3-0-3). Winter. Not 
offered in 1950. 

English 27 - Reading Modern Drama (5-0-5). Spring. Not offered 
in 1950. 

Students will participate in class reading and discussion of 
selected dramas. The plays will not be acted. The course is expected to 
improve the student's diction and reading. 

English 28 - Public Speaking (5-0-5) . Winter. 

Fundamental principles involved in group discussion and the prep- 
aration and delivery of original speeches for formal and informal oc- 
casions. 

English 29 - Voice and Articulation (5-0-5) . Spring. 

Fundamental principles and drills for development of the speaking 
voice. Phonetic analysis of the sounds of the English language as 
a basis for correction of common articulatory and vocal defects. 



34 ARMSTRONG COLLEGE 

FINE ARTS 

Art 11 - Creative Art (2-6-5). Winter. 

Drawing, art principles and design w ith work in other media at 
the descretion of the instructor. Some application will be made to 
postermaking, lettering and everyday life needs. 

Art 19 - Fundamentals of Flower Arranging (3-0-2). Winter. Not 
offered in 1950. Laboratory fee, $2.50 

A course designed to acquaint the student with a brief history of the 
use of flowers; the use of design (composition, focus, unity, color and 
balance) ; current trends in arranging; study of Japanese, mass line 
and modern styles; table-decorating: corsage-making; and decorating 
for occasions. One period weekly will be devoted to lecture, the other 
two periods will supplement lecture material by work with plants, 
foliage and blooms. Particular attention is given to local problems, as 
well as to helping develop individual style. 

Drama 11 (3-4-5). Fall. 

A study of modern theatre practice, both technical and administrative. 
In the laboratory students will become a part of an active producing 
company. Plays will be selected, cast, directed, designed, lighted and 
costumed by students, and will be performed before invited audiences. 
The group will work directly with the Savannah Playhouse. 

Drama 12 (3-4-5). Winter. 

Continuation of Drama 11. Students encouraged to specialize in 
one of the various departments of production. No prerequisites. 

Drama 13 (3-4-5). Spring, 
one of the various departments of production. No prerequisites. 

Music 20 - Great Music (5-0-5). Spring. 

A course designed to help the reader understand and enjoy great 
music. Several works will be analyzed in detail as to form, harmony 
and structure. A text will be used for factual background, class time 
being concentrated on brief exposition of themes followed by listening 
to records. Classic, romantic and modern composers will be studied.. 



FOREIGN LANGUAGES 
French 
French 11-12 - Elementary French (5-0-5). Fall and Winter. 
A course for beginners. Emphasis is placed on the spoken language. 



, 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 35 

Grammar and reading arc included in the COUTSe. Practice with rec- 
ords is required outside of regular class hours. 

French 21 - Intermediate trench (5-0-5). Fall and Spring. Pre- 
requisite: Two quarters of college French or two years of high school 
French. 

Review grammar, oral practice, reading of selected texts. 

French 22 - Intermediate French, continued (5-0-5). Winter. Pre- 
requisite: Three quarters of college French or three years of high 
school French. 

Further reading of texts, oral and composition practice. 

French 23 - Introduction to Literature (5-0-5). Spring. 
A survey course with particular emphasis on the nineteenth century. 
Written and oral reports on collateral readings. 

French 24 - French Classic Drama (5-0-5). Spring. Not offered in 
1950. 

Selected plays of Corneille, Moliere and Racine are studied. Four 
plays are read in class and four plays read as collateral. 

German 

German 11-12 - Elementary German (5-0-5). Fall and Winter. Not 
offered in 1949-1950. 

Drill in fundamentals. Grammar, oral and written practice, early 
reading of selected material in German. Second part is devoted to 
additional grammar and conversation. 

German 21 - Review Grammar (5-0-5) . Spring. Not offered in 1950. 

Spanish 
Spanish 11-12 - Elementary Spanish (5-0-5). Fall and Winter. 

These courses are for the purpose of providing the student with 
the elements of Spanish by reading, composition and speaking. 

Spanish 21 - Intermediate Spanish (5-0-5). Fall and Spring. 
Grammar review composition and selected prose readings. 

Spanish 22 - Advanced Spanish (5-0-5). Winter. 

The purpose of this course is to increase the students' facility in 
writing and speaking Spanish. Selected masterpieces of Spanish 
literature are read. 



36 ARMSTRONG COLLEGE 



Spanish 23 - Commercial Spanish (5-0-5). Spring. Not offered 
in 1950. 

A study of business letters and forms used by the Spanish-speaking 
world and of the vocabulary of trade, travel and communication. 

Spanish 24 - Modern Prose Readings (5-0-5). Spring. 

This course provides intensive reading of novels, plays and short 
stories of nineteenth and twentieth century Spanish and Latin-Ameri- 
can authors. 

Spanish 25 - 19th Century Spanish Literature (5-0-5). Winter. Not 
offered in 1950. Prerequisite: Spanish 21. 

Brief survey of the 19th Century Spanish Literature. 

Spanish 26 - 20th Century Spanish Literature (5-0-5). Spring. Not 
offered in 1950. Prerequisite: Spanish 21 or its equivalent. 
Brief survey of 20th Century Spanish Literature. 



HISTORY 

History 11-A Historical Introduction to Contemporary Civilization 
(3-0-3). Fall and Spring. 

This course comprises a chronological survey of the main currents 
of political, social, religious and philosophical thought in Western Civil- 
ization from the period of the sixth century in Greece to the present 
time. 

History 12 - A continuation of History 11 (3-0-3). Fall, Winter and 
Summer. 

History 13 - A continuation of History 12 (3-0-3). Winter, Spring 
and Summer. 

In addition to a chronological treatment of events studied in the 
above courses, the dynamics of Western Civilization are studied in 
works of the following authors: Plato, Lucretius, St. Augustine, 
Dante, Machiavelli, Descartes, Locke, Swift, Rousseau, Adam Smith, 
Ricardo, Malthus, Bentham, Carlyle, Marx, Shaw and Hersey. 

History 11-12-13 are required of all students seeking an Associate 
degree from Armstrong College and are designed to be complementary 
with English 11-12-13. 

History 20 - Contemporary Civilization (3-0-3). Spring. Not of- 
fered in 1950. 

The course has as its purpose the examination of the most important 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 37 

events and movements, political, social and cultural, in American life 

from about 1900 to the present time. 

History 21 - English History (5-0-5). Fall. Not offered in 1949. 

A study of English political and social institutions from early times 
to the present with special emphasis given to developments since the 
Tudor period. 

History 22 - Latin America (5-0-5). Spring. 

This course deals with the colonial, revolutionary and recent develop- 
ments in the countries of Hispanic America. 

History 23 - Contemporary American History (5-0-5). Winter. 
Not offered in 1950. 

The purpose of this course is to examine the major factors in the 
development of the U. S. from the Spanish-American War to the pres- 
ent time. Political, social and cultural issues are examined and de- 
velopments abroad which come into contact with the American scene are 
studied. 

History 24 - Survey of Modern Europe (5-0-5). Spring. Not of- 
fered in 1950. 

The rise of nationalism, the trend of Europe toward imperialism, 
the alliance system leading to World War I, the post-war treaties and 
the problems which precipitated World War II with some indication 
of the problems which the European nations now face. Japan and 
China are included where their impact on Western Civilization is felt. 

History 25 - Recent American History (5-0-5). Fall and Winter. 

This course has as its purpose the examination of the most im- 
portant events and movements, political, social and cultural, in Ameri- 
can life from about 1900 to the present time. 

History 26 - Recent European History (5-0-5). Spring. 

This course is designed to provide an opportunity for detailed study 
of major national and international developments in European affairs 
from about 1870 to the present time. Special emphasis is devoted 
to the First World War and new developments in Europe following that 
war and the complex of world events which preceded the Second World 
War. 



HOME ECONOMICS 
Home Economics 10 - Orientation (3-0-3). Fall. 
An introduction to home economics that gives the student some 



38 ARMSTRONG COLLEGE 

idea of the vocational opportunities in this field so she will be able to 
take belter advantage of her course of study in college. 

Home Economics 11 - Clothing (2-6-5). Fall and Spring. Lab- 
oratory fee, $1.00. 

A study of clothing to suit the individual needs and the application 
of art principles to dress, together with problems in clothing con- 
struction in laboratory periods will be pursued. 

Home Economics 12 - Foods (3-2-5). Fall and Spring. Lab- 
oratory fee, ST. 00. 

An introduction to the basic food and family meal service. Com- 
plete meals are prepared and served in each laboratory period. 

Home Economics 13 - Catering (2-6-5). Winter. Laboratory fee, 
$7.00. Prerequisite: Home Economics 12, or consent of instructor. 

A more advanced approach to food preparation and selection. 
Foods are purchased and prepared for special occasions, such as 
formal dinners, luncheons, receptions and teas. 

Home Economics 21 - Home Furnishing (3-4-5). Fall. Labora- 
tory fee, $2.00. Prerequisite: Art 11 or consent of the instructor. 

A study of the home from the standpoint of family needs. Both 
the interior and exterior of the home are considered with reference 
to such topics as home lighting, wall treatments, floor coverings, 
and storage space. Period styles of furniture from those of ancient 
times to the present are studied. 

Home Economics 22 - Nutrition (5-0-5). Spring. Prerequisite: 
Chemistry 14 and 15, or consent of the instructor. 

A consideration of the laws governing the food requirements of 
individuals for maintenance and growth of the body. The food nu- 
trients and their contributions to the daily dietary are studied. 

Home Economics 23 - Advanced Clothing (2-6-5). Winter. Lab- 
oratory fee, $1.00. 

Lectures cover garment selection and wardrobe planning and an in- 
troduction to the study of textiles. Laboratory periods are devoted 
to developing more advanced techniques in clothing construction. 

JOURNALISM 

Journalism 11 - (1-2-2). Fall. 

Students gain practical experience in working out editorial, mechan- 
ical and business problems dealing with a publication. 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 39 

Journalism 12 - ./ continuation of Journalism 11 (1-2-2). Winter. 
Journalism L3 - / continuation of Journalism 12 I 1-2-21. Spring. 

MATHEMATICS 

Mathematics 11 - Basic Mathematics (3-0-3). Fall and Spring. 

Mathematics 11, 12. and 13 is a terminal sequence, giving informa- 
tion about the genesis and development of mathematics. An in- 
troduction to inductive and deductive methods; Euclidean and non-Eu- 
clidean systems; theory of arithmetic numbers, operations and mea- 
surements; and logarithms. 

Mathematics 12 - Basic Mathematics (3-0-3). Winter and Summer. 
Prerequisite: Mathematics 11. 

A continuation of the course started in Mathematics 11; variation; 
interest and annuities; progressions of numbers; combinations and 
probability; functional relationships; and the binomial theorem. 

Mathematics 13 - Basic Mathematics (3-0-3). Spring and Fall. 
Prerequisite: Mathematics 12. 

Advanced circular functions; equations; common curves; and sta- 
tistical concepts. 

Mathematics 16 - College Algebra (5-0-5). Fall and Spring. Pre- 
requisite: Two years of high school algebra and one of Plane Geome- 
try. (Students with insufficient preparation may audit Mathematics 16) . 

A course in advanced algebra planned for mathematics or science 
majors. The course consists of functions and graphs; logarithms; 
linear and quadratic equations; the binomial theorem; complex num- 
bers and the elementary theory of equations. 

Mathematics 17 - Trigonometry (5-0-5). Fall and Winter. Pre- 
requisite: Mathematics 16. 

A course covering the solution of the right and general triangle; 
the general solution of trigonometry equations; trignometric identi- 
ties; polar coordinates and the use of the slide rule. 

Mathematics 18 - Plane Analytic Geometry (5-0-5). Winter and 
Spring. Prerequisite: Mathematics 17. 



40 ARMSTRONG COLLEGE 

Analytic geometry of the point, line and circle; elementary conic 
sections; polar coordinates; transcendental curves and transforma- 
tion of coordinates. 

Mathematics 21 - Differential Calculus (5-0-5). Fall. Prerequisite: 
Mathematics 18. 

Theory of differentiation, with application to tangents; maxima and 
minima; rates; curvature; velocity and acceleration; approximations; 
and Newton's method. 

Mathematics 22 - Integral Calculus (5-0-5). Winter. Prerequisite: 
Mathematics 21. 

Formulas and methods of integration; single integration applied 
to areas and lengths; volumes and surfaces of revolution; centroids 
and moments of inertia; pressure and work. 

Mathematics 23 - Differential and Integral Calculus (5-0-5). Spring. 
Prerequisite: Mathematics 22. 

The law of the mean and indeterminate forms; series, with ap- 
plications: partial and total derivatives, with applications; essentials 
of solid analytic geometry; multiple integration, applied to areas, 
volumes, centroids and moments of inertia. 



MUSIC 

(See Fine Arts) 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

Physical Education 11M - Conditioning Course for Men (0-3-1). 
Fall. 

Consists in calisthenics; stunts and tumbling; lifts and carries; 
road work, dual combatives; and simple games. 

Physical Education 11W - Same course for women (0-3-1). Fall. 

Physical Education 12M - Team Sports for Men (0-3-1). Winter. 
Consists of elementary basketball, soccer, or speedball. 

Physical Education 13A/ - Elementary Swimming for Men (0-3-1). 
Spring. 

Physical Education 13W - Same course for women (0-3-1). Spring. 



J 



COURSE DES CRIPTIONS 41 

Physical Education L8 - Advanced Basketball for Men (0-3-1). 
Winter. 

Physical Education 19 - Tumbling 1 0-3-1). Not offered in 1949-50. 

Physical Education 20 - Eirst Aid and Safety Education (4-0-3). 

The American Red Cross standard course in first aid is followed 
by a broad consideration of the opportunities for safety teaching in 
the school program. 

Physical Education 21 - Elementary Tennis (0-3-1). Fall. 

Physical Education 22 - Elementary Boxing jor Men (0-3-1) . Winter. 

Physical Education 23 - Senior Life Saving and Instructors' Course 
in Swimming for Men (0-5-2). Spring. 

Physical Education 24 - Boxing for Teachers (0-5-2). Winter. 

Physical Education 25 - Folk Rhythms (0-3-1) . Fall. 

Physical Education 26 - Modern Dance for Women (0-3-1). Winter. 

Physical Education 27 - Tap Dance for Women (0-3-1). Winter. 

Physical Education 28 - Adult Recreative Sports (0-3-1). Spring. 
Consists of passive, semi-active, and active games and sports which 
have carry-over value for later life. 

Physical Education 29 - Folk Rhythms for Teachers (0-5-2). Fall. 

PHYSICS 

Physics 10 - Physics Survey (5-2-6). Spring. Laboratory fee, 
$2.50. 

A study of the fundamentals of physics. Emphasis will be placed 
on the theories necessary to explain heat, electricity and mechanics as 
used in the home. 

Physics 11 - Introductory Physics (5-2-6). Fall. Laboratory fee, 
$2.50. 

A study of mechanics and heat, force, motion, simple machines, 
the mechanics of fluids, and heat. 



42 ARMSTRONG COLLEGE 

Physics 12 - Introductory Physics 1.5-2-6). Winter. Laboratory 
fee, S2.50. 

A study of electricity, sound and light, electrostatics, magnetism, 
and simple circuits. 

Physics 21 - Mechanics (5-3-6). Fall. Laboratory fee, $2.50. 
Prerequisite: Mathematics 18. (Mathematics 21 should be taken con- 
currently.) 

A study of statics, kinetics, elasticity, hydrostatics, mechanics of 
gases, fluids in motion, surface tension and capillarity. The theory of 
errors will be included in the laboratory work. 

Physics 22 - Electricity (5-3-6). Winter. Laboratory fee. S2.50. 
Prerequisite: Physics 21 and Mathematics 21. 

A study of magnetism, electrostatics, batteries, electrical measure- 
ments, electromagnetism, induced currents, electrical machinery, elec- 
trical oscillations, and thermo-and photo-electric emmission. 

Physics 23 - Heat, Light and Sound ( 5-3-6 I . Spring. Laboratory 
fee, $2.50. Prerequisite: Physics 22 and Mathematics 22. 

A study of thermal expansion heat measurements, change of state, 
heat and energy, propagation of heat, production and transmission 
of sound waves, reflection and refraction of light, dispersion, inter- 
ference and polarization of light. 



POLITICAL SCIENCE 

Political Science 12 - Comparative Foreign Government (5-0-5). 
Spring and Summer. Not offered in 1949-1950. 

A study is made of the governments of Great Britain, France. Rus- 
sia and the pre-war Fascist nations, Germany and Italy, in detail. 
The theory and practice of each government is observed with some 
comparison and contrast being stressed. In addition, a brief survey of 
the governments in Switzerland, Japan and China is made; the 
structure of the United Nations is outlined. 

Political Science 13 - Government in the United States (5-0-5). 
Fall and winter. 

A study is made of the structure, theory, workings of the national 
government in the United States and some of the major problems 
of the state and local government. The course shows how develop- 
mental practice has arrived at our government as it stands today. 



C OURSE DESCRIPTIONS 43 

PSYCHOLOGY 
Psychology 21 - Introductory Psychology (5-0-5). Fall and Winter. 

An introductory course in psychology, including discussions of 
learning, memory, behavior, psycho-biological relationships, morale 
and motivation. The facts and principles from scientific research 
in psychology are applied to the student in his present use of college 
experience. 

Psychology 22 - Social Psychology (5-0-5). Winter. Prerequi- 
site: Psychology 21. 

This course is an introduction to the psychology of groups. An 
analysis is made of the psychological and socio-cultural motivation 
of the individual from infancy to adulthood from the standpoint of 
his group relationships. Special attention is given to a study of 
leadership, the development of radical and conservative qualities, 
propaganda, war, facism, communism, delinquency and public 
opinion. 

Psychlogy 23 - Child Psychology (5-0-5). Spring. Prerequisite: 
Psychology 21. 

A study of the developmental factors operating in a child's ex- 
perience that make for, or interfere with, effective expression of 
his capacities and efficient adjustment to life situations. Sources 
are drawn from experimental research and from the findings of 
analytical psychology. 

Psychology 24 - Educational Psychology (5-0-5). Spring . Not 
offered in 1949-1950. 

A study of psychological theories of learning and of goals in learn- 
ing as they are represented in various teaching methods used in 
schools, family life and in social changes. 

Psychology 25 - Psychology of Adjustment (5-0-5). Winter. Pre- 
requisite: Psychology 21. 

In this course emphasis is placed on the types of adjustment, the 
development and measurement of personality traits and techniques 
of mental health. 

PUBLIC SPEAKING 

(See English 28 and 29) 

SOCIOLOGY 

Sociology 20 - Introductory Sociology (5-0-5). Fall. 

A study of the principles of social organizations in American cul- 



44 ARMSTRONG COLLEGE 

ture based on scientific studies of groups, '"races," population and 
of the institutionalized functions of societ\. 

Sociology 21 - Marriage and the Family (5-0-5). Winter and 
Spring. 

A study of family backgrounds, preparation for marriage, marriage 
interaction and family administration, family economics, problems of 
parenthood, family disorganization. A study of the family in the 
post-war period and present trends in family life are included. 

SPANISH 
(See Foreign Languages) 

SCHOOL OF NURSING 

Armstrong College offers the following nurses' courses in coopera- 
tion with the Warren A. Candler School of Nursing: 

Anatomy and Physiology In and 2n - (3-2-4). Fall and Winter. 
Laboratory fee, $2.50. 

A two quarter course in human anatomy and physiology. The 
gross anatomy, some histology and physiology of the organ systems 
are presented in order to give the student an understanding of the 
human body as a basis for her further studies in clinical nursing. 
The laboratory work includes some dissection of the lower vertebrates 
and elementary experiments in physiology. 

Microbiology In - (2-3-4). Spring. Laboratory fee, $2.50. 

An introduction to micro-organisms as living organisms and as 
pathogens. The structure, life history and public health importance of 
representative virures, bacteria, molds, potozoa and helminths are con- 
sidered. The laboratory work includes the techniques of culturing 
bacteria and the study of the scientific basis of antiseptic and asep- 
tic procedures. 

Chemistry In - (4-3-5). Laboratory fee, $2.50. 

The purpose of this course is to acquaint students with the principles 
of inorganic, organic and physiological chemistry with special appli- 
cations to nursing practice. 

Sociology 2n - (3-0-3). 

This course considers (1) the principles of sociology; (2) the nurse 
as a citizen of the community and as a professional worker; (3) the 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 45 

importance of the hospital among tin* social agencies in the community ; 

(4 I tin* patient in the hospital Coming from the family and returning 
to the famil\ . 

Home Economics 2n - Nutrition and Food Preparation (3-0-3). 
Laboratory fee. $4.00. 

The fundamental principles of nutrition and food preparations 
are considered. The nutrition requirements of children and of adults 
are compared. Special attention is given to the nutrition requirements 
of childhood and pregnancy. 

Psychology In - (3-0-3). 

This course is an introduction to the study of human behavior with 
emphasis on the underlying principles of mental adjustments. The im- 
portance of the nurses own personality is stressed. 

English In - (3-0-3). 

A basic course in the fundamentals of reading, writing, and speaking 
English. 



: 



46 ARMSTRONG COLLEGE 

INDEX 

Page 

Admission to Class 18 

Admission to College 8 

Administration 3 

Advanced Standing 9 

Aims 8 

Art 34 

Assemblies 20 

Athletics 15 

Attendance 20 

Audio-Visual Instruction 14 

Biology 26 

Calendar 1949-1950 2 

Certificate. Admission by 9 

Chemistry 27 

Clubs 5, 6 

College Commission 3 

Commencement Exercises 15 

Commerce 27-30 

Commerce, Business Administration, Associate in 24 

Commerce, Secretarial, Associate in 24 

Community Guidance Center 13 

Core Curriculum 23 

Counseling Staff 12. 18 

Curricula 22-25 

Course Load 18 

Course Descriptions 26-45 

Dean's List 20 

Degrees 23-25 

Dismissal 21 

Drama 34 

Economics 31 

Employment 14-15 

Engineering 31-32 

Engineering, Associate in 25 

English 32-33 

Examination, Admission by 9 

Faculty 3-6 

Fees 10-11 

Fine Arts 34 

Foreign Languages 34-36 

French 34-35 

General Course, Associate in 23 

German 35 

Grades 19 



INDIA 17 



Graduation, Requirement! for 21 

History i, t ' College 7 

History 36-37 

Holiday! 2 

Homecoming 14 

Home Economicfl 37-38 

Home Economics, Associate in 24 

Honors 20 

fatal 46-47 

Intramural Sports 15 

Journalism 38-39 

Libera] \rN. \--ociate in 24 

Library 12-13 

Loans 14 

Mathematics 39-40 

Music 34 

Nurses, Courses for 44-45 

Open House 14 

Organization of College 7 

Physical Education 40-41 

Physical Examination 18 

Physics 41-42 

Placement Service 15 

Political Science 42 

Psychology 43 

Publications 16 

Public Speaking 33 

Re-Admission 21 

Recommendations 21 

Refunds 11 

Reports 19 

Requirements for Admission 9-10 

Savannah Playhouse 16-17 

Scholarships 14 

Science, Associate in 25 

Sociology 43-44 

Spanish 35-36 

Special Students, Admission of 10 

Stenographic Course 25 

Student Activities 15 

Student Assistants and Associates 14 

Student Center 15 

Student Conduct 19 

Student Objectives 22 

Summer Session 2 

Testing Program for Freshmen 28 

Transfer Students 9 

Transfer to Other Institutions 22 

University of Georgia Off-Campus Center 14 

Veterans, Admission of 10 

Withdrawal 20 



ARMSTRONG COLLEGE 

LIBRARY 



ARMSTRONG 

• COLLEGE • 

AVANNAH- GEORGIA 



*73S 

' IS 



For Reference 

Not to be taken from this room 



1950 - 1951 



FA] I 



WINTER 



SPRING 



SI MMKI! 



Bulletin of 



Armstrong College 



A Junior College Maintained 
1)\ the Citv of Savannah 




18342 

Membership hi 



American \>-oriation of Junior Colleges 
Southern Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools 

\-~ociation of Georgia Colleges 
Georgia Association of Junior Colleges 



VOLUME xv 



NUMBER 1 



ARMSTRONG COLLEGE 

LIBRARY 



CALENDAR FOR 1950-51 



FALL Ql \RTER 

Freshman testing and Sophomore counseling September 18 

Freshman Orientation September 19-23 

Registration September 25 

( lasses begin September 26 

Last da\ to register for credit October 6 

Mid-term reports due October 27 

Thanksgiving Holiday November 23-26 

Pre-registration December n-H 

Examinations December 13-15 

Homecoming Dance December 15 

Parade and Basketball Game December 16 

Homecoming Reception December 17 

Christmas Holidays December 17-January 1 



WINTER QUARTER 

Registration January 2 

Classes begin January 3 

Last day to register for credit January 12 

Mid-term reports due February 2 

Pre-registration March 5-7 

Examinations March 14-16 

Spring Holidays March 17-21 



SPRING QUARTER 

Registration March 22 

Spring Holidays March 23-25 

Classes begin March 26 

Last day to register for credit \pril 5 

Mid-term reports due April 27 

Pre-registration — Summer and Fall Quarters May 23-25 

Examinations June W 

Sophomore Party June 8 

Sophomore-Alumni Luncheon June 9 

Graduation June 11 



SUMMER SESSION 

Registration. June 18 

( lasses begin June 19 

Holiday Julj I 

Examinations July 2< 



A dm in st ration 

THE COLLEGE COMMISSION 

III RS< III l. \ . Jl SKINS (./murium 

William Murphei Vice-Chairman 

Morris Bernstein James P. Il<>i lihan, Ea officio 

Jack .1. Cn<>k. Ex officio (i. Philip Morgan, Sr. 

\\ . M. I) wi>. Ex officio Mi;-. William F.Robertson 

Olin F. Fi lmer, Ex Officio Fred L Shearoi se 

Alfred T. Yi< k. A'\ officio 

THE FACULTY 

Foreman M. H w\i:s. \.l>.. M.S. President 

"Arthur M. Gignilliat, \.l>.. M. \. Registrar 

\\ . ORSON BEECHER, \.EL M.A /M//z o/ Students 

Fran< is M. Brannen, B.S Business Manager 

\\ . Orson Bee< her, V.B. and M.A., Emorj I niversit) ; M. \. I niversit) 
of Georgia 

Instructor in History 

Laura Blakeley, B.S. and M.A.. Peabod) College 
Instructor in Mathematics 

Francis M. Brannen, B.S. in Chemical Engineering, Georgia Institute 

of Technology 

Instructor in Chemistry and Engineering 

R. Clifton Campbell, B.A. and M.A.. Emor\ I ni\crsit\ 
Instructor in History and Political Science 

Arthur M. Casper, B.S., Beloit College; M.S.. Universit) of Wisconsin 

Instructor in Mathematics 

Vnna Cone, V.L.A., Vrmstrong College; B.A., Universit) of Georgia 

Secretary to the Dean of Students 

" :: On Leave of Absence. 



VRMSTRONG COLLEGE 



\nm K. Crolly, B.A., I rsuline College of Men Orleans 

/ v sis tn ni Registrar 

William M. Dabney, V.B. and M. \ . I iii\cr>it\ of Virginia 
Instructor in History and Political S< iencc 

Harriet Davis, A.B.. I niversit) <»f North Carolina 

Publicity 

Lamar Davis, B.S., I niversit) of South Carolina 

Instructor in Business Administration 

Lillian DOUGLAS, B.S.. Birmingham-Southern College: M.S.. Emorj 
I niversit) 

Instructor in Chemistry 

Eleanor .1. Doyle, B.S.. Immaculate College: M.A.. Catholic University 
of America 

Instructor in Spanish and Latin American History 

* Arthur M. Gignilliat, A.B. and M.A.. University of Georgia 
Instructor in English 

Noma Lee Goodwin, A.B. and M.A., Duke University 
Instructor in English 

Ann HuTCHINS, B.S.. Georgia State Woman's College 
Instructor in Biology and Chemistry 

Joseph I. Killorin. A.B.. St. Johns College 

Instructor in History 

Margaret Spencer Libs, B.M.. Converse College: A.B.. University of 
Georgia: M.A.. Columbia I niversit) 

Instructor in French 

Elmo M. McCray, B.S. and M. S.. Universit) of Alabama 
Instructor in Biology 

Dorothy Morris, B.S.. University of Tennessee 

Instructor in Physical Education 

Marjorie A. Mosley. \ssociate in Finance and Commerce. Armstrong 
College 

Secretary to the President 

Hinckley A. Murphy, B.A.. Vanderbilt Universit) 

Instructor in English 

Josie R. Nelson, Graduate <>f Banks Secretarial School 

Bookkeeper 

< )n Leave <>f Absence. 



ADMINISTRATION 



V. K\Ms I * 1 1 < HER, B.S. and M >.. I. mors I niversit) 
Instructor in I'll \ w< ! 

Ik\im N. Smith, \.B. and M.A., I niversit) of North Carolina 

Instructor in English 

\\m^ Pace Smith, B.M., Eastman School of Music of the I niversit) 

of Rochester; M.A., I niversit) of North Carolina 

Director of the Glee Club Instructor in \iusic 

MARGARET FoRTSON Stephens. \ R., LLB.. and M.A.. University of 
Georgia; (Certificate from the Sorhonne. Paris. France 
Instructor in English 

CARLSON R. Thomas. B.A., University of Richmond; M.A.. University 

of North Carolina 

Director of Savannah Playhouse — Instructor in Drama 

Dorothy M. Thompson, A.B.. Monmouth College: M.A.. Northwestern 
University; Certificate of Psychiatric Social Work. Western Re- 
serve L niversity 

Instructor in Psychology and Sociology 

Carmen Torrie, B.S.. Concord College: M. S., University of Tennessee 
Director of Athletics and Instructor in Physical Education 

Helen C. Wolfe, B.S.. Columbia University 

Instructor in Home Economics 

Helen E. Woodward, A.B.. Maryville College: B.S.. Peahody College: 
M.A., Vanderbilt L niversity 

Librarian 

Gladys Nichols Zilch, Diploma from the Gregg School of Chicago 
Instructor in Commerce 



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General Information 

HisTom \\D Organization 

Armstrong College was founded on Max 27. 1 ( ).V). b\ the Ma\«»r 
and Aldermen of the ("it\ <»f Savannah to meet a long-fell need for a 

junior college. The first college building was the magnificent home of 
the late George F. Armstrong, a gift to the city from his widow and 
his daughter. The former home, now called the Armstrong Building. 
is an imposing structure of Italian Renaissance architecture: inside, 
its spacious rooms and marble halls lend an air of dignity, while outside 
it is one of the most beautiful college buildings in the South. 

Over the years, through private donation and public appropriation, 
the campus has been enlarged until now it includes four additional 
buildings: the Lane Building, a gift of the late Mills B. Lane, prominent 
banker: John W. Hunt Memorial Building in which are located the 
Student Center, the Home Economics Department, the Women's Lounge, 
the Dancing Studio, and the Music Room: Herschel V. Jenkins Hall, 
which contains the auditorium, theater for the Savannah Playhouse, and 
classrooms: and Thomas Gamble Hall, site of science lecture rooms and 
laboratories. 

Three of the buildings face forty-acre Forsyth Park, the most beau- 
tiful park in the city; the other two face Monterey Square, one of the 
carefully planned squares for which Savannah is famous. 

Hodgson Hall, across from Forsyth Park on Whitaker Street, con- 
tains the college library as well as the Library of the Georgia Historical 
Society, to which Armstrong students have access. 

The college is under the control of a commission of six members, 
appointed by the Mayor. In addition, the commission includes as 
ex-officio members the Mayor, the Chairman of the Chatham County 
Board of Education, the Chairman of the County Commissioners, the 
Superintendent of the Board of Education, and the President of the 
Savannah Chamber of Commerce. 

Except for the war years, enrollment has shown a steadv increase 
until the present student body numbers approximately five hundred. 
As need arises, the curriculum is enlarged and modified to meet new- 
demands. 



\RMSTKO\G COLLEGE 



Aims 
The college seek- to ser\e the community b\ gis ing tin- men and 

women who attend it> classes a better understanding of the world in 
which the) li\e and the experience of adapting knowledge to meet the 
obligations and responsibilities of citizenship. 

The student ma\ complete one or more of the following spe- 
cific objectives: 

1. Receive additional liberal education stressing how to live 

more abundant!) : 

2. Complete the freshman and sophomore years of the four- 
year senior college program leading to the baccalaureate 
degree; 

3. Finish two years of pre-professional work leading toward 
medicine, dentistry, law. home economics, the ministry and 

other professions; 

4. Graduate from a semi-professional program, prepared to 
go into business or industry. 

The college awards the degree of Associate in Arts to students com- 
pleting an approved program. 

Admission To The College 
( For dates see calendar on page 2 I 

A student planning to enter Armstrong should obtain from the 
Registrar an "Application for Admission Card." The student should 
complete this form and return to the Registrar. REQl EST THE HIGH 
SCHOOL PRINCIPAL. OR THE COLLEGE REGISTRAR (in the case 
of a transfer student!. TO SEND A TRANSCRIPT OF CREDITS to 
the Registrar. Armstrong College. Savannah. Georgia. 

Having checked the student's records for compliance with the mini- 
mum requirements for admission, the Registrar will send a notice to 
the student that he has been admitted to the college, together with cer- 



tain physical examination forms which must be completed and returned 
before the student can complete registration. The applicant will be 
notified of the dates of the next testing program. These tests do not 
affecl a student's entering Armstrong, but will enable the counseling 
staff to assist him in selecting a program of study upon entrance. 
STl DENTS ARE REQUIRED TO TAKE THESE TEST MEASURE- 
MENTS BEFORE REGISTRATION. The Registrar welcomes personal 
interviews with individuals planning to further their formal education. 



GENER \l. INFORMATION 



li qi iki mi n rs For Vd mission 

\\\ ( I Kill K MK 



1. \ candidate for admission to Armstrong College l»\ certificat< 
must be 
of credit. 



must be a graduate <»f an accredited high school with Bixteen units 



:!. No subject -matter units are prescribed. The high school program 

should be <»f such nature a> to give satisfactory preparation for begin* 
ning college studies. Subjects which nun he expected to contribute to 
thi> end arc English composition, literature, natural science. histor\ 
and other social studies, foreign languages, and mathematics. The 
right i> reserved to reject an\ applicant whose high school program 
does not indicate adequate preparation for college work. 

3. A record of high school credits earned l>\ the applicant should he 
made out on the proper forms by an official of the high school and 
mailed direct!) to the office of the Registrar. This certificate becomes 
the propert) of the college and cannot be returned to the applicant. 

4. Three units in mathematics and one in physics or its equivalent 
is pre-requisite for admission to the freshman class in engineering. 



BY EXAMINATION 

Students beyond high school age. who do not meet the above re- 
quirements for admission by certificate, may take the General Educa- 
tional Development tests (high school level) at the local Community 
Guidance Center. The student will be admitted to college on the basis 
of his score. Entrance examinations should be completed at least one 
week before registration. Additional information may be secured from 
the Registrar. 



ADMISSION TO ADVANCE STANDING 

Advanced credit will be allowed for work done in other institutions 
of proper rank and standing and for schools and experiences in the 
Armed Services. Only 10 per cent of the total number of hours trans- 
ferred will be accepted in "D" grades. All work presented for advanced 
standing will be evaluated by the Registrar. To receive a diploma from 
Armstrong College, a student must be in attendance the two quarters 
preceding graduation, making a "C" average enrolled for a normal 
load. and. in addition, must satisfy the requirements of a particular 
course of study. Adults (students over 21 years of age I may receive 
credit for certain college work on the basis of the General Education 
Development tests at the junior college level. 



in ARMSTRONG COLLEGE 



ADMISSION 01 \ l . I I RANS <>K WORLD U \K II 

Armstrong College will accept veterans who arc not high school 
graduates if their official GED tesl records in the local Community 
Guidance ("cuter show Bcores that indicate the applicant's ability to 

do college work. Main students have attended Armstrong under the 
provisions of Public Laws 16 or 346. Certificates of eligibility should 
be secured from the Veterans Administration prior to registration. 



ADMISSION OF SPECIAL STUDENTS 

Vdults desiring to enroll in courses for their intrinsic \alue but 
not desiring transfer credit may be enrolled as special students. Re- 
quirements pertaining to entrance examinations, physical examinations 
and physical education courses do not apply to these students. 



Fees 
Tuition will be charged as follows: 

, . fl^Hi $50.00, 

tor I- quarter hours or m<>rr.^BBBilW 

For each quarter hour less than 12 quarter hours. S4.25. 



All veterans must present a certificate of eligibility the first time 
the} register at Armstrong College. Veterans once enrolled do not 
require a supplementary certificate unless they have used the G. I. Bill 
since the last quarter they were registered at the college. STL DENTS 
WHO REQUIRE A CERTIFICATE OF ELIGIBILITY FROM THE 
VETERANS ADMINISTRATION BUT HAVE NOT OBTAINED IT 
PRIOR TO REGISTRATION WILL BE REQUIRED TO PAY CASH 
WHICH MAY BE REFUNDED BY THE BUSINESS OFFICE UPON 
RECEIPT OF THE CERTIFICATE. 

\ student activity fee of $5.00 per quarter will be charged all 
students. This fee will entitle the student to subscriptions to the Gee- 
chee, the college annual, and other college publications and the admis- 
sion to college-sponsored dances, membership in the Playhouse, and 
Armstrong Athletic Club. 

Students taking laboratory work will be required to pay a fee for 

materials and equipment. This fee is indicated in the description of 
courses found under ""Course Description-"" elsewhere in this bulletin. 



GENER \l. INFORM \Tln\ I) 



\ late registration fee of $2.00 For one day late, $5.00 for two 
days hi t »* ami $10.00 U>\ three or more days late will be charged an) 
Btudenl who fail> to register and pay fees on the day designated for 
registration, unless he presents a doctor's excuse. In no event will the 
late registration fee exceed $10.00. 

\n\ student who desires to lake more than I!! quarter hours per 

quarter must have the Registrar's approval. 

Vnyone wishing to audit a course (but not receive college credit i 
ma\ do so with permission of the instructor l>\ paying a fee of $10.00 

per course. 

\ graduation fee <>f $7.50 will be collected from each candidate 

for graduation. 

\n\ student delinquent in the payment of am fee due the college 
will have grade reports and transcripts of records held up. and will not 
be allowed to re-register at the college for a new quarter until the 
delinquency has been removed. 

Each student leaving Armstrong College is entitled to one official 
transcript of his college work. The charge for additional copies is 
SI. 00 each. Written requests for transcripts are complied with promptly 
when received in the Registrar's office. 



Refunds 

Refunds of fees and tuition will be made ONL\ upon written 
application for withdrawal from school. 

Students who formally withdraw after the first scheduled da\ of 
registration will be entitled to a refund as per the following schedule: 
One calendar week or less after date — 30^? of fees paid for that quarter: 
between one and two calendar week? — 60 % of fees paid for that quar- 
ter: between two and three calendar weeks — MY < of fees paid for that 
quarter: between three and four calendar weeks — 20 r v of fees paid 
for that quarter. After four weeks no refunds will be made. 

No refunds will be made to students dropping a course. 



COUNSELING 

The Counseling service of Armstrong College, in connection with 
the office of the Dean of Students, offers help in solving problems 
connected with the student's pursuit of the college program. The 
counselor has special training which enables him to offer individual, 
confidential, non-disciplinary help at the students own request. 



12 armstkqn g college 

Students arc urged t<> request help frmn their instructors when the 
difficult) is one concerned with the subject itself and having no compli- 
cations. The areas with which the counselor is usualK concerned are 
choices of vocation, the planning <>f w<>rk in college, stud) habits gen- 
eralrj and personal adjustment t<> college life. Those problems which 
do not fit into these general categories either because <>f greater inten- 
sity «»r critical development arc referable t<» communit) agencies outside 
the college if the student <»r his guardians so agree. 

The main function of the counselor is to help the student w<>rk 
out his own problem successfully, and the onl) administrative function 
which the counselor has is to plan with ever) student in advance of 
registration his work at the college. 

Library 

Hodgson Hall houses not only the librar\ of Armstrong College, 
but also that of the Georgia Historical Society. Since all books are 
on open shelves, students have immediate access to both collections. 
The reading room, which has recently been redecorated, is well lighted, 
most attractive and popular among the students. One section of this 
room is furnished with lounge chairs and opens into a garden, which is 
also an added attraction to many readers. 

The library's holdings consist of a very good collection of standard 
reference books and fiction totaling 10.000 volumes. There are more 
than 100 periodical subscriptions, including seven newspapers, four of 
which are dailies. 

In addition to the resources of the college library, students are 
encouraged to use the Savannah Public Librar\. which has a good 
reference department and much material of interest to students, includ- 
ing a large collection of fiction, government documents, microfilm 
copies of newspapers, and music records. The main building is on Bull 
Street and has a union catalog, listing the holdings of the Downtown 
Branch. Waters Avenue Branch, and of the Georgia Historical Society. 

The library is fortunate in being the recipient of an outstanding 
collection of history books, a gift of the late Mayor Thomas Gamble, 
of Savannah. 

I nder the supervision of a trained librarian, two full-time assis- 
tant-, and eight student assistants, the library is open on certain 
evenings for the use of the night school students, and each school 
day from 8:30 \. M. t«. 5:30 P. M. 

COMM1 \m Gi Il)W( E Cl NTER 

hi December 1945 the Guidance Center began operation as a voca- 
tional counseling service under a contract between Armstrong College 
and the Veteran- Administration. This contract i> one of five similar 
arrangements in the State of Georgia: and it enables Armstrong to 



GENERAL INFORMATION I 



emplo) a -tall of professionally trained personnel t»> help veterans with 
their vocational planning problems. I>\ the spring <>f L950 approxi- 
mately 1,856 veterans from a 38-count) territory had taken advantage 
of this service, which the federal government provides free <>f charge 

to all men and women who served in the I . S. \rmed Forces during 

W.-rld War II. 

The counseling procedure consists mainl) of helping client- <li>- 
COVer or \erif\ their assets and limitations (through testing of mental 
ability, special aptitudes, school achievement, interesl pattern, and per- 
sonal adjustment I . and to relate this information about themselves t<» 
the "world of work" (through discussion, reading in occupational in- 
formation files, and conference with persons alread) successful in 
occupations which seem interesting to the client i. 

In September 1946 the Guidance Center extended vocational coun- 
seling service to a limited number of young people and adults from the 
communit) -at-large on a "private clinic, fee basis. Armstrong students. 
as referred by the faculty Counseling Committee, may be accepted with- 
out charge. At this same time the Guidance Center began to function 
as a psychological diagnostic clinic for children sent in by the schools, 
health and welfare agencies. 

The Center is located in the Lane Building at 20 West Gaston 
Street, with testing and vocational counseling on the ground floor, and 
the Mental Hygiene Clinic occupying half of the main floor. 

Audio-Visual Instruction 

Many of the classrooms of the college are equipped with screens 
for the showing of films, which are used extensively by all of the 
departments. In the teaching of English, foreign languages and music, 
visual aids are supplemented by recordings. 

University Of Georgia Off-Campus Center 

The President of Armstrong College is ex-officio University of 
Georgia representative in Savannah in the operation of the Off-Campus 
Center. The Center is supervised by a full-time director and utilizes 
the college plant. The evening college including work bevond the level 
of the junior college is under the supervision of the Off-Campus 
Center, a branch of the Extension Division of the University of Georgia. 

Homecoming and Open House 

Twice each year the college invites the public to visit the campus. 
The week before Christmas Holidays. Homecoming is celebrated for all 
alumni and students with a parade, a reception, an intercollegiate 
basketball game, and the Christmas dance. All alumni, students and 
their friends are invited to attend. 



I l ARMSTRONG COLLEGE 



During the Spring, the college is open to the general public for 
Inspection during its annual Open House. Exhibits are prepared l>\ 
the various departments interpreting the work done in the junior college. 

Those desiring may make tour- of the college buildings and attend a 
><>< ial hour in the Home Economics Department. 

Sri DEN l ASSISI INTS IND AsSO< l VI ES 

The college employs each sear a number <>f student associates and 
assistants to work with the faculty. These students find empldymenl 
in the library, science laboratories, business office, and with the faculty. 
Students desiring one of these jobs should apph to the instructor in 
the department in which he is interested or to the President 

Scholarships \m> L<>\\> 

There are a numher of scholarships and loans available for stu- 
dents. Application blanks may be secured by a request addressed to 
the President of Armstrong College. Applications for scholarships and 
loans for the school year beginning in September must be on file in 
the President's office by July 15. Applicants will be notified when 
personal interviews are scheduled. 

Placement Service 

The Publicity Director at the college maintains a placement service 
for the benefit of employers and students. Anyone seeking part-time 
employment while in college, or full-time employment after leaving 
college, should place his name on file with this official. 

Commencement Exercises 

Commencement exercises are held once each year in June. \t 
this time the degree of Associate in Arts is awarded to those students 
who have met the requirements for graduation. At this time recog- 
nition is given to those students who qualify for scholastic honors. The 
Faculty and Graduates participate in full academic dress. 

Sti dent Center 

The college does not operate dormitories. The Student Center in 
the Hunt Building is open throughout the college day. affording recrea- 
tion between classes. \ snack bar serves hot lunches as well as cold 
snacks. A book store is also operated for the student's convenience. 

Student Activities 

The entire program of extra-curricular activities at the college i> 
designed to help develop the whole individual and to assist him in 

becoming an active member of the community. The program comes 
directh under the Dean of Students who is assisted b\ the Student 



(.1 \l.i; \l. INFORM \Tln\ 1 5 



Senate, composed of representatives from each recognized club <>r 
group. Each student is urged t<> participate in those activities which 

appeal to hi> interest OF meet his need-. 

\ l ill. I l [( - 

The college engages in inter-collegiate basketball. All other Bports 

at the college are operated on an intramural basis, \rmstrong College 

was the champion of the Georgia Junior College League in 1948, semi- 

finalist in 1949, and finalist in 1950. 

[ntrami r \l Sports 

Intramural teams are organized into a men's league and a women's 
league for competition in certain major sports. At the end of the school 
year the champion in each league is awarded a trophy. 

Social Clubs 

The eollege recognizes certain groups which are organized to foster 
social life among the students at the college. 

Pre-Professional Clubs 

Some clubs are organized to acquaint students with the ideals and 
objectives of certain professional groups, as in the engineering and 
the science clubs. 

Class Clubs 

These clubs are designed to encourage students to pursue their 
various intellectual interests beyond the instructional activities of the 
classroom, as the French club, the mathematics club, and others. 

Publications 

The college publishes the Inkwell, a newspaper: the Mercury, a 
magazine: and the "Geechee. a year book. These afford students an 
opportunity to express their opinions on a wide varietv of topics, to 
do creative writing and to gain practice in other journalistic activities. 

Recreation Clubs 

Armstrong is a community college. To fulfill this mission, the 
college extends its activities beyond the student body, inviting all in- 
terested citizens of the community to participate in different recrea- 
ional groups. Outstanding among these is its community playhouse, 
the Glee Club. Film Forum. Great Books Seminar, the Music Club and 
other cultural groups. Members of the community, though not regis- 
tered at the college, who are interested in any of these cultural activities 
are invited to participate. 



16 ARMSTRONG COLLEGE 



S\\ \\\ \n PlaI HOI SE 



The Savannah Playhouse <>f \rmstrong College is an example <>f a 
communit) projecl sponsored and directed 1>\ the college. Local citi- 
zens as well as students ma\ gain here actual experience in acting, 

designing, construction, lighting, make-up and all the theater skills 
that make a good production. 

Reactivated in 1947 after a five-year suspension of activity, the 
Playhouse quickly established it> reputation as one »»f the leading non- 
professional theaters in the South with a calendar of five dramatic 
productions playing a total of 2!> regular performances. 

Major productions during the last three seasons include My Sister 
Eileen, Winter set. The Importance of Bein^ Ernest, Lije With Father. 
Green Grow the Lilacs. Angel Street. The Taming of the Shrew, I Re- 
member Mama, Charley's Aunt, The Barretts of Wimpole Street. The 
Drunkard. 

Glee Club 

The Armstrong Glee Club was reorganized in September. 1949. 
Its members are drawn from the student body and faculty. Besides 
giving two complete concerts at the college, one at Christmas and one 
in the Spring, the group has sung for main civic clubs in Savannah. 

In April. 1950. the Glee Club made a trip to Macon. Georgia. t<> 
appear before the District Rotary Convention. 

Rehearsals of one-hour duration are held three times a week. 
Membership is open to all interested students. 



General Regulations 

Coi NSEUNG 

To help a student "find himself 1 and selecl a definite objective 

earl) in his college program, the Armstrong stafT administers t<> each 

entering freshman a series <>f interest, aptitude, and achievement tests. 
In the fall, these are given during Ireshman Week and are scored prior 
to the student's Interview with a counselor. On the hasis of these ob- 
jective measurements, the student's previous record, his interests and 
his fainiK counsel, the student with the aid of his advisor decides on 
a program of stud) which uill enable him to accomplish his purpose. 

Physical Examination^ 

All regular students are required to enroll for courses in physical 
education. Each student must submit a completed physical examina- 
tion report on the forms furnished by the college before he can com- 
plete his registration. On the basis of the examinations, the physical 
education department will adapt a program of training suited to indi- 
vidual requirements. 

Course Load 

The unit of work for a regular student is 15-18 quarter hours per 
quarter. A nominal schedule of sixteen quarter hours presupposes that 
the average student will devote approximately forty-eight hours per 
week to his college classes and to his preparation therefor. 

Permission to enroll for more than 18 quarter hours will be granted 
by the Registrar when curricular requirements make such action neces- 
sary, or when evidence as to the capacity of the student seems to justify 
that the privilege be granted. 

Should a student's work load fall below the normal schedule, the 
student's parent or guardian I in case of veterans attending school under 
Public Law 16 and 346. the Veterans Administration I will be notified. 

Admission To Class 

Students will be admitted to class when the instructor is furnished 
by the Registrar an official class card indicating that he has completed 
his registration and paid his fees in the Business Office. 

Conduct 

Armstrong students are expected to conduct themselves as ladies 
and gentlemen. Compliance with the Commission and faculty regula- 
tions is assumed. The use on the campus of intoxicating beverages, 
gambling, and hazing are prohibited. The faculty approved the recom- 



18 ARMSTRONG COLLEGE 

mendation of the Student Senate for consideration and handling of 

honor infractions in class work. This provision and other instructions 

contained in the Armstrong Handbook are official regulation-. 

Reports wi> Grades 

It is felt b\ Armstrong that students in college should be held ac- 
countable for their own scholarship. Accordingly, report cards, warn- 
ings of deficient scholarship and other such notices are not sent out to 
parents or guardians by the college except by request. Instead the 
students themselves receive these reports and are expected to contact 
the counseling staff whenever their work is unsatisfactory. Report 
cards are issued at the end of each quarter. Reports of failing grades 
are issued in the middle of each quarter. Each student has access to 
a counselor, made up of the faculty members for purposes of advise- 
ment: and in addition, the Registrar. Dean of Students, and all instruc- 
tors are available to help and advise any student seeking assistance. 

Reports are based on the following system of grading: 

4 honor points per quarter hour 
3 honor points per quarter hour 
2 honor points per quarter hour 
1 honor point per quarter hour 
No honor points per quarter hour 
Conditions must be removed before 
mid-terms of the following quarter 
Course must he repeated 
Course must he repeated 
Failing Course must he repeated 

An "E'" (conditional failure) ma\ he removed by means stipulated 
by the instructor of the course in which the student received the grade 
"E". An "E" not removed by the mid-term of the succeeding quarter 
automatically becomes an "F". If a course in which an **E"' grade was 
received is repeated, an "F" will be entered on the students permanent 
record card for the first time the course was taken. 

Honors 

Students who have been in attendance for three consecutive quar- 
ters taking a normal load and have achieved an average of "B" or better 
with no grade below that of "C" will be placed on a Permanent Deans 
List in a book for that purpose kept in the office of the President. This 
list is published each June in the commencement program. 

Graduates who meet the requirements for the Permanent Dean's 
List and who arc graduating with an average of three honor points 



A 


plus 


Exceptional 


A 




Excellent 


B 




Good 


C 




Fair 


D 




Poor 


E 




Conditional 
Failure 


F 




Failure 
Withdrew 


\\ 


-F 


Withdrew 



GENER VL R EGULATIONS 19 

per quarter hour, will be designated as graduating Minima cum laude 
(with highest distinction). The designation cum laude (with distinc- 
tion) will be bestowed upon those meeting tin- above requirements with 
an average of tw<> honor points per quarter hour. 

\ valedictorian will be selected l>\ the graduating class from among 
the five students with the highest scholastic averages in the work com* 
pleted before the term in which the students graduate. 

Students who make a grade of "B or better in each course during 
an\ quarter will he placed on the Dean's Scholastic Attainment List. 

Attendant r. 

Students are expected to attend classes as scheduled. Any absence. 
whatsoever, from class work entails a loss to the student. 

A student who has been absent from class for a valid reason should 
have the absence excused. The student will submit a written excuse 
to the instructor who will initial the excuse. The student will then turn 
the form in to the Registrar's office. Excuses must be submitted within 
seven days from the date the student returns to school: otherwise the 
absence will not be excused. 

A student who has unexcused absences equal in number to the 
time the class meets in one week, and has one additional unexcused 
absence, will be dropped from class. The instructors will notify the 
Registrar when a student should be dropped from class. The Registrar 
will notify the student. The grade given a student who has been dropped 
will be either W or W F, depending on the status of the student at the 
time he is dropped from class. 

Students are required to attend the college's bi-weekly assemblies. 
Official announcements are made at these meetings. 



Withdrawals 

A formal withdrawal, presented to the Registrar in writing is a 
prerequisite for honorable dismissal from, or re-entrance into, this in- 
stitution. Any student planning to withdraw should immediatelv make 
such intentions known to the administration of the school in writing. 
This notice is required to receive any authorized refunds. 

In order that a student may not receive a failing grade on his per- 
manent record in the Registrar's office, he should make formal with- 
drawal from any class which he stops attending. The instructor's 
approval should be brought to the Registrar's office in writing. 



20 ARMSTR ONG COLLEGE 

Students will receive a prejudicial grade in a five-hour course 
dropped after the second week or In a three-hour course dropped after 
the third week of a quarter unless there are extentuating circumstances 
approved l>\ the instructor. 

Graduation 

Id order to graduate, a student must complete with a "C" average 
one of the programs of stud) consisting of approximately 100 hours 
which are listed under "Curricula". Students lacking 10 quarter hours 
or less for graduation may complete these hours at an accredited senior 
college and receive a diploma from Armstrong College upon applica- 
tion, furnishing the college with a transcript of the completed work. 

To be considered as a candidate for graduation, a student should 
make application in the Registrar's office at least two quarters prior to 
the expected date of graduation. 



Recommendations 

The recommendations issued by the college are written in terms 
of the grades the student earns, and what his teachers think of him as 
expressed by them on a student rating form. These reports are part 
of his permanent record. 

The records of the Registrar's office are consulted regularly by 
representatives of the Federal Bureau of Investigation, the Civil Service, 
the local Credit Bureau and other agencies having access to confiden- 
tial records. These records are of vital importance to the student. 



Curricula 



General 

Before registration, the studenl Bhould PLAN \ PROGRAM OF 
STI 1)Y WITH A COl NSELOR. Even if a studenl knows whal studies 
are required of him to graduate, he should have on record in the Dean 
of Students" office a cop) of hi> program. 

The Associate of Arts degree is conferred upon all students who 
complete at Armstrong College one of the programs of study outlined 
in the catalog. It is expected some students will want to change their 
objectives. The college desires to help them "find themselves." 

Before registering and after a full discussion and consideration of 
his interests and qualifications with parents and friends who can help 
him. and after interviews with members of the faculty or a counselor, 
the student should decide what he is going to study. The student will 
then work out a tentative list of the subjects to be taken during each 
of the quarters he plans to be at Armstrong. This list will be kept for 
future reference so that he may build his program each quarter with 
a definite goal in mind. 

If the student changes his objective and wishes to change his pro- 
gram of study, he will report this fact to his counselor. 

If completion of his training involves going to another school after 
he leaves Armstrong, the following steps are urgent: 

Secure the college's catalog and see what courses must be com- 
pleted at Armstrong College to meet the degree requirements at the 
senior college; 

Schedule the prerequisites for the courses to be taken later: 
make a list of the subjects to be taken at Armstrong College for 
each of the quarters before transferring, and be sure it includes 
all of the courses required for the junior class standing, if possible. 

The Core Curriculum 

There are certain bodies of knowledge and certain skills indispen- 
sable to every college trained man and woman. The understanding of 
one's environment and man's struggle to adapt it to useful ends, the 
ability to communicate his thoughts and feelings: right group-attitudes 
and coordinated physical activity — these objectives are set up in the 
following courses required of all students desiring to graduate from 
the college. An equivalent course taken at another institution is ac- 
ceptable. 



22 ARMSTRONG COLLEGE 

Freshman year: English L 1-12-13; Histor) Ll-12-13; ten quarter 

hours of a Laboratory science, and three quarters of physical education. 

Sophomore year: English 21-22-2.H and three quarters of physical 
education. Students enrolled in certain terminal courses described 
below ma\ substitute English 20 and English 21! for English 21-22-23. 

Students graduating in less than the six quarters of the regular 
session ma\ reduce their physical education requirements accordingly. 

Physical education should he taken in the proper sequence and two 
courses should not he scheduled in an\ one quarter. 

Course Numbers 

Subjects listed from 10 through 19 indicate work that is usualK 
taken in the freshman year: and from 20 through 30, subject- recom- 
mended for stud) in the sophomore year. 

Associate In Arts 

concentration-commerce and senior couuece preparatory* 

business administration 

Many students will wish to continue their business studies in a 
senior college. These students should enroll for the following program: 

First Year Second Year 

Core Curriculum 31 Core Curriculum 12 

Commerce lla-b-Typing 4 Commerce 24-25-Accounting 10 

Mathematics 11-12-Basic Mathe- Economics 21-24-Introductory and 

maties 6 Applied 10 

Electives 9 Political Science 13 - American 

Government 5 

Total Hours 50 Electives 13 

Total Hour- 50 

\ student should consult the catalog of his prospective senior college for re- 
quired subjects. Colleges differ as to what subjects are required for this course. 



CONCENTRATION-BI SINESS ADMINISTRATION TERMINAL 

Main students will not continue their formal education after leav- 
ing Armstrong. To these students the college gives the opportunity to 
-elect those subjects which have a vocational value. Sufficient general 
education is included in the core curriculum to make this a well-rounded 
program. 



( 01 RSI DESCRIPTIONS 






Firsi Yi \k 






( ore ( in i wiilum 




:;i 


1 . onomics 2 1 2 Untroducl 


t»i\ 




ami Applied 




LO 


Elect ives 




9 



Second \ i m 
( ommerce 1 1 -a l> I j ping 1 

I i- rce 12-a b-c Shortland or 

Commerce 24-25-26-Accounting IS 
I nglish 2()-( lomposition 5 

Commerce 27-28-Business Law LO 
English 28-Publie Speaking 
Physical Education 3 

Electivea 8 



Total Hours 
If Shortham 



50 
quai ter 



i- desired, om 
Economics the first year. 
'English 21-22-23 may be taken in I 



Total Hours 
Accounting is to l> 



50 

substituted for 



;u of these English courses. 
COM ENTRATION-CHEMISTR1 SENIOR COLLEGE PREPARATORY 

The student who wishes to concentrate in one field of study may 
take a program similar to the one described below for a major in 
chemistry. The junior college seeks to give a broad general education 
rather than to specialize in one particular field. For that reason it is 
advisable for the student to check the senior college catalog for which 
he is preparing and take only those courses which are transferable for 
credit. 



First Year 

Core Curriculum 21 

Chemistry 14-15-General 12 

Chemistry 24-Qualitative Analysis 6 
Mathematics 16-17-18-College Al- 
gebra, Trigonometry. Analytic 
( Geometry 15 



Second Year 

Core Curriculum 12 

( ihemistry 25-26-Quantitative 

Analysis 12 

French 10 

Mathematics 21-22-Differential 

and Integral Calculus 10 

Elect ives 5 



Total Hours 54 



Total Hours 49 



CONCENTRATION-COMMERCE SECRETARIAL TERMINAL 

This program is designed to meet the needs of those students who 
wish to qualify for clerical positions in business. 



First Year 

Core Curriculum 31 

Commerce lla-b-c-Typing 6 

("ommerce 12a-b-c-Shorthand .15 



Total Hours 52 



Second Year 
Commerce 24-Accounting 5 

"English 20-Composition 5 

Commerce 17-Oftice Practice ... 5 

Commerce 21a-b-c-Typing 6 

Commerce 22a-l)-c-Shorthaml .15 

-English 28 5 

Physical Education 3 

Electives 6 

Total Hours 50 



English 21-22-23 may he substituted for these English courses. 



24 



ARMSTRONG COLLEGE 



« <>\< l \ rRATION-HOME l I ONOMU - 

The \ ocational opportunities 
tion for marriage and personality 
the home making cours - 

Firsi V EAR 

( lore ( Curriculum -1 

Horn. Economies 10-Orientation 3 
Home Economics ll-Qothing 5 

Honic Economics 12-Foods 5 

Mathematics Ll-Basic Mathematics 3 

Art 11 -Creative 5 

Chemistry 11-12-Introductory 10 

Total Hours .">2 



SENIOR < OLLEGE PREPARATORY 

in this field arc numerous. Prepara- 
development arc other objectn - 



S OND ^ EA> 

< ore ( Curriculum 12 

Psychology 21-Introdut tors "> 

Biolog> lo 
Home Economics 21-Home 

Furnishing 5 

Home Economic- Elective 5 

Sociology 21-Marriage ami tin- 
Family 5 

Elective 

Total Hour- 17 



CONCENTRATION-HOME ECONOMICS TERMINU. 

This course is designed to meet the needs of those women who plan 
to complete their college work at Armstrong. Sufficient electives are 
allowed to enable the student to select commerce subjects which have 
a vocational value or cultural subjects for worthy use of leisure time. 



First Year 

(lore Curriculum 31 

Home Economics ll-Qothing 5 

Home Economics 12-Foods 5 

Psychology 21-lntroductory 5 

Elective 5 



Total Hours 



Second Year 

Core Curriculum 12 

Home Economics 21-Home 

Furnishing 

Home Economics 22-Nutrition 5 

Sociology 21-Marriage ami the 

Family 5 

Electives 22 



Total Hour- 



19 



CONCENTRATION-LIBERAL ARTS SENIOR COLLEGE PREPARATORY 

This program is recommended for candidates for an \.B. degree, 
pre-education. pre-law. pre-ministerial. journalism, and other pre-pro- 
Eessional concentrations, 



CI RRIC1 l.\ 



First V i \k Second "> i in 

( ore ( lurriculum 31 

Foreign Language l<> 

Mathematics 11-12-13-Basic Math- 
ematics 01 Mathematics 16-17- 
< ollege Ugebra and Trigo- 
nometry 9 



( ore 1 hi r iculum 


12 


1 wo ill tin- folio* ini: courses i 


in 


History 25-Recen! European 




Political Science L3-American 




( Government 




Psychology 21-Introductorj 




S< ience 


10 


Elective* 


18 


Total Hour- 


50 



Total Hour- 50 



\ student applying lor admission to a senior college which does nol require the 
amount indicated of 1 1 1 1 — subjecl may, with the approval of his counselor, substi- 
t ut »■ other courses required l>\ the senior institution. Student- not planning to 
major in mathematics or physical sciences should postpone mathematics until 

ihe -ophomore year and complete 15 hours of foreign Language and 5 hour- oi 
an elective in the freshman year. 



CONCENTRATION-LIBERAL ARTS TERMINAL 

To the students who will not continue their formal education after 
leaving Armstrong, this program gives the opportunity to select those 
subjects which are liberal in nature, giving one a better understanding 
of himself and his environment. Sufficient electives are allowed to 
enable the student to explore that field of knowledge in which he is 
particularly interested. 

First Year Second Year 

Core Curriculum 31 Core Curriculum 12 

Mathematics 11-12-Basic Mathe- Psychology 21-Introduetory 5 

matics 6 Sociology-Marriage and FamiTj 

Electives *f Electives 28 

Total Hours 50 Total Hour> ;>() 



CONCENTRATION-PHYSICAL EDUCATION SENIOR COLLEGE PREPARATORY 

The Physical Education Department is qualified to provide the 
first two years of preparation for a major in the field of health and 
physical education for those students planning to enter the field of 
education or supervised recreation. 



26 



ARMSTRONG COLLEGE 



First ^ ear Si < <»\n Yeah 

Core Curriculum 21 Core Curriculum 10 

Mathematics 11 12-13-Basic Math- tnatomj Ln and 2n 8 

ematics or Mathematics 16-17- Hoim . Economics 22-Nutrition 

College \lj:«'|)ra ami trigo- * DL , ,- , M ., , , 

nometrj 9 PhyMcd Ed"" 5 * 110 " ^^ » 

Physics or Chemistry 10 Psychology 21-Introductory 

,-, • In Psychology 23-Ghild .) 

Electives 10 

Sociology 21 -Marriage and Family r> 

Electives 8 

Total Hours 50 Total Hours 

•Women will tak>- Physical Education 29 and one othrr Physical Education course 



< n\< K.\TRATION-PRE-DENTAL 



SENIOR COLLEGE PREPARATORY 



All courses for pre-professional degrees should conform to senior 
college requirements. 



First Year 

Core Curriculum 12 

Chemistry 14-15-General 12 

Mathematics 11-12-13-Basie Math- 
ematics or Mathematics 16-17- 
Colleg^ Algebra and Trigo- 
nometry 9 



SB OND ^ EAR 

Core Curriculum 

French 

Physics Ll-12-Survey 

Electives 



Total Hours 



12 
10 
12 
15 

49 



Total Hours -~>2 



CONCENTRATIOVPRE-MEDICAL 



SENIOR COLLEGE PREPARATORY 



All courses for pre-professional degrees should conform to senior 
college requirement-. 



First "l k\r 

Core Curriculum 12 

Biology 11-12-General Zoology 10 

Chemistry 14-15-General 12 
Chemistry 24-Qualitative Analysis 6 

Mathematics 16-College \li:fl>ra 5 

Mathematics 17-Trigonometry 5 



Total Hours 



;>o 



Sb ond Year 

Core Curriculum 21 

Biology 23-Vertebrate Anatomy 6 
Chemistry 25-Qualitative Analysis 6 

French 10 

Physics U-12-Survey 12 

Total Hour- 



CURRICULA 27 



Oni V i m; Proch \\i> 

( o\( ENTRATION-1 NGIN1 ERING SENIOR COLLEGE PREPAR \ TOK\ 

This program xx ill satisf) degree requirements for the fir»i yeai of 
most types oi engineering bul Bhould be varied f<»r certain degrees such 
a> chemical, electrical, etc. The student should obtain a catalog from 

the senior college he plans to attend and check this program against the 
requirements. The courses required for the freshman year have been 
worked out in consultation with the Georgia Institute of Technology; 



Chemistry 1 U5-General 12 

English 11-12-13-Freshman 9 

Engineering 11-12-13-Drawing 9 

Engineering 26-Plane Surveying 2 

Historj 1 1-12-13- Western Civilization < or Modern Language! 9 

Mathematics 16-17-18-College Algebra. Trigonometry and Analytic Geometry ...15 
Physical Education 11-12-13 3 

Total Hours 59 



CONCENTRATION-STENOGRAPHIC 

A student who has only one year to spend in college may herein 
master some of the tools that will enable him to earn a livelihood. 

Commerce lla-h-c-Typing 6 

Commerce 12a-h-c-Shortland 15 

Commerce 17-Ofnce Practice 5 

Commerce 24-Accounting 5 

English 20-Composition 5 

English 28-Puhlic Speaking 5 

Physical Education 11-12-13 3 

Electives 5 

Total Hours 49 



28 ARMSTRON G COLLEGE 

( ONCENTRATION-Nl RSING 

Armstrong College offers the following courses in co-operation writh 

the Warren \. Candler School <»f Nursing. With the permission of the 

instructor and the approval of the student's counselor, a student not en- 
rolled in the School of Nursing may take any of the following courses. 

Anatomy and Physiology In and 2n 8 

( Ihemistry In 5 

English In 3 

Home Economics 2n 4 

Microbiology 2n 4 

Physical Education 11-12 2 

Psychology In 3 

Sociology In 3 

Total Hours 32 



Course Descriptions 

Gener m. 
Armstrong College reserves the right to (1) withdraw any course 

for which less than ten Students register, l2l limit the enrollment in 
BJ1) Course or class section. (3) fix the time of meeting of all classes 
and sections, and ill olTer such additional courses as demand and staff 
personnel warrant. 

\<> credit will he <ri\en in beginning courses in commerce and 
languages where the same or similar courses have been presented for 
admission from high school. 

Where two or more courses are listed under one description, no 
credit for graduation will he given until the sequence is completed. 

\fter each course, the first number listed is the number of hours 
of lecture: the second, the number of hours of laboratory and the 
third, the number of hours of quarter-hour credit the course carries; 
e.g. i 3-3-4 1 means 3 hours of class. 3 hours of laboratory, 4 quarter 
hours of credit. 

ARTS 

(See Fine Arts) 

BIOLOGY 

Anatomy and Physiology In and 2n - (3-2-4.) Fall and Winter. 
Laboratory fee. S2.50. 

A two quarter course in human anatomy and physiology. The gross 
anatomy, some histology and physiology of the organ systems are pre 
sented in order to give the student an understanding of the human bod 
as a basis for her further studies in clinical nursing. The laborator 
work includes some dissection of the lower vertebrates and elementar 
experiments in physiology. 

Biology 14 - General Zoology (3-4-51. Fall and Winter. Laboratorv 
fee: S3 .50. 

Introduction to animal structures and function and a survey of the 
invertebrate phyla. Laboratory work on invertebrates. 

Biology 15 - General Zoology (3-4-51. Winter and Spring. Labora- 
tory fee: $3.50. Prerequisite: Biology 14. 

Study of vertebrate structure and function, and using selected verte- 
brate material for laboratory dissection. Concludes with a study of 
the principles of Evolution and Genetics. 



30 ARMSTKONc; COLLMiK 



Biology L6-17-18 - Human Biology (3-1-3 1 3). Fall. Winter, and 
Spring. Laboratory fee, $1.00. 

A three quarter course for terminal students beginning with a Burve) 
of the basic biological principles and then a stud) of the structure and 
function of the human body. Principles of Evolution and Genetics will 

be discussed in the last quarter. One hour laboratory a week on selected 
vertebrates. 

Biology 22 - Invertebrate Zoology (3-6-6). Spring. Laboratory fee: 
$5.00. Prerequisite: Biology 14 and 15. 

A study of the structure and function of invertebrates including their 
economic relation to man. Field trips included for natural habitat study. 

Biology 23 - Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy (3-6-6). Fall. Lab- 
oratory fee: $5.00. Prerequisite: Biology 14 and 15. 

A study of the anatomy and evolution of the organ systems of the 
vertebrates. Laboratory work on Squalus. Necturus and the cat. 

Microbiology In - (3-2-41. Spring. Laboratory fee: $2.50. 

An introduction to micro-organisms as living organisms and as 
pathogens. The structure, life history and public health importance of 
representative viruses, bacteria, molds, potozoa and helminths are con- 
sidered. The laboratory work includes the techniques of culturing 
bacteria and the study of the scientific basis of antiseptic and aseptic 
procedures. 

CHEMISTRY 

Chemistry In - (4-3-5). Laboratory fee. S2.50. 

The purpose of this course is to acquaint students with the principles 
of inorganic, organic and physiological chemistry with special applica- 
tions to nursing practice. 

Chemistry 11 - Introductory General Chemistry (4-2-5). Winter. 
Laboratory fee. S3. 50. 

This is an introductory course designed for the non-science students. 
A stud\ of some of the elements and their compounds and a review of 
practical chemistr\ arc included. 



Chemistry 12 - Introductory General Chemistry (4-2-5). Spring 
Laborator\ fee. $3.50. 

A continuation of Chemistn 11. 



COURSE DESCR IPTIONS _31 

Chemistry 11-1") - General Chemistry (5-3-6). Fall and Winter. 
Laboratory fee, $3.50. Prerequisite: t\\" years of high school mathe- 
matics. 

This is tin' course in general descriptive chemistry. It will meel the 
freshman requirements in chemistry of engineering, science and pre- 
medical students. The fundamental laws of chemistn and some element* 

and their compounds are studied. 

Chemistry 21 - Qualitative Analysis (3-6-6). Spring. Laborator) 
fee, 15.00. Prerequisite: Chemistry L5, Mathematics 16. 

The lectures include a Stud) of the theoretical and fundamental prin- 
ciples of the subject, as well as a thorough studs of the reactions of 
the more important ions. The laboratory work includes the systematic 
analysis for both anions and cations l>\ a semi-micro scheme. 

Chemistry 25 - Quantitative Analysis (3-6-6). Winter. Laboratory 
fee, $5.00. Prerequisite: Chemistry 24. 

This is an elementary course in quantitative analysis. 

Chemistry 26 - Quantitative Analysis (2-8-6). Spring. Laboratory 
fee, $5.00. Prerequisite: Chemistry 25. 

This is a more advanced course in quantitative analysis with emphasis 
on gravimetric and instrumental methods of analysis. 



COMMERCE 



Commerce lla-b - Beginning Typing 1 0-5-2 1 . Fall and Winter. 
Laboratory fee. $3.50. 

This course consists of introductory instruction in the technical 
features and care of the machine, position, fingering, proper technique 
and mastery of the keyboard. An average speed of 40 words a minute 
is attained at the end of the second course. 

Commerce lie - Intermediate Typing (0-5-2). Spring. Laboratory 
fee. S3. 50. Prerequisite: Commerce lla-b or equivalent. 

A typewriter course in which emphasis is placed on speed building 
and accuracy. Special typing problems such as business letters, minutes, 
notices, stencil cutting and carbon copies are stressed. 

Commerce l'2a-b - Beginning Shorthand (5-0-5). Fall and Winter. 

Complete theory of Gregg Shorthand in the manual. Additional 
reading and dictation given from the Speed Studies. 



32 ARMSTRONG COLLEGE 

Commerce 12c - Intermediate Shorthand i .")-(>-.") i . Spring. 

Dictation and transcription <>f new and studied material. Student 
i- required to take dictation at the rate of eight) words a minute. 

Commerce 13a - Burroughs Calculator and Comptometer (0-5-2). 
Kail. Laboratory fee, $3.50. 

I he objective of this course is to build speed and accuracy in the 
operation of the Burroughs Calculator and Comptometer and a thorough 
review <>f business mathematics. This quarter is devoted to the opera- 
tion of the four fundamentals in arithmetic of the calculator. 

Commerce I'M) - Burroughs Calculator and Comptometer (0-5-2). 
W inter. Laboraton fee. $3.50. 

The following business mathematics are reviewed and applied on the 
machine during this quarter: decimal equivalents, split divisions, in- 
voicing over the fixed decimal, percentages, discounts, and chain dis- 
counts, costs, selling price and rate of profit. 

Commerce 13c - Burroughs Calculator and Comptometer (0-5-2). 
Spring. Laboratory fee. S3. 50. 

The third quarter is a continuation of business problems on the 
machine. The transactions covered are reciprocals, figuring grain. 
cipher, division, prorating cost and expenses, gross and dozen in in- 
voicing inventories. 

Commerce 15 - Business Communications 1 3-0-3 1 . Not offered 
1950-51. 

A study of business correspondence, letters, information reports, 
follow-up sales programs, statistical analysis and inter-office communi- 
cations. Stress is placed on the mastery of fundamentals of clear writing. 

Commerce 17 - Office Practice ( 5-0-5 l . Spring. 

Typical business office situations are duplicated as nearly as possible. 
Practical problems deal with dictation and transcription, typing, opera- 
tion of the mimeograph, filing and office courtesx . 

Commerce 10 - Modern Business Mathematics (3-0-3). Spring. 
Prerequisite: Mathematics 11-12 or its equivalent. 

This course gives that background necessar\ for dealing with prob- 
lems found in banking, real estate, financing, and accounting: the 
operation of the compound-interest law in business: simple problem- 
concerning bonds, sinking funds, valuation of properties, annuities, 
and insurance. Practical problems in these fields will be emphasized. 
The necessary aid- and shortcut- with use of tables and logarithm- will 
be studied. 



(i)[ RSE DESCRIPTIONS 



Commerce '2\a - id vanced Typing (0-5-2). Fall. Laboratory fee, 
$3.50. Prerequisite: Commerce Me or equivalent. 

Vdvanced typing i- a course in the acquisition <>f speed and accuracy 
including various legal forms and papers, manuscripts and business 

papers. \n average «»f 65 words a minute is attained. 

Commerce '2\l> - I continuation of Commerce 21a ■ (0-5-2). \\ inter. 

Laboratory fee, $3.50. 

Commerce 2\c - / continuation of Commerce 2\l> - (0-5-2). Spring. 

Laborator) fee, $3.50. 

Commerce 22u - Advanced Shorthand (5-0-5). Fall. Prerequisite: 
Commerce 12a. I>. c. 

A course in which the principles of Gregg Shorthand are applied 
in developing skill and accurac) in writing shorthand and in transcrib- 
ing. The first half year is devoted to dictation of general business 
material: the second half, to dictation material apph ing to 16 major 
vocations. \ speed of 120 words a minute for 5 minutes is required. 

Commerce 22b - A continuation of Commerce 22a I 5-0-5 I . Winter. 

Commerce 22c - A continuation oj Commerce 22b (5-0-5). Spring. 

Commerce 23a - Advanced Calculator and Comptometer (0-5-2). 
Fall. Laboratory fee. S3. 50. 

The next two quarters are devoted to the application of the machine 
and business mathematics to the following businesses: drugs, hardware, 
electrical, plumbing, contracting, wholesale paper, pay roll, packing 
house, creameries and dairies, laundries, steel and iron, department 
stores, banks, lumber, petroleum, railroads. 

Commerce 236 - A continuation of Commerce 23a (0-5-2). Winter. 
Laboratory fee. S3. 50. 

Commerce 23c - Advanced Calculator and Comptometer (0-5-2). 
Spring. Laboratory fee. S3. 50. 

Speed, skill and accuracy in the operation of the machine are stressed 
in this last period. 

Commerce 24 - Principles of Accounting. Introductory (5-0-5). 

An introduction to the fundamental principles and procedures of ac- 
counting, including a stud\ of the journal, the ledger, accounting state- 
ments, controling accounts, special journals and the accounting system. 

Commerce 25 - Principles of Accounting. Introductory (5-0-5). Win- 
ter. Prerequisite: Commerce 24. 



»1 ARMSTRON G COLLEGE 

\n application of accounting principles to certain problems such 
a> the proprietorship, the partnership, the corporation, departmental 
operations, manufacturing accounts and the analysis of accounting 
statements. 

Commerce 26 - Principles of Accounting, Intermediate (5-0-5). 
Spring. Prerequisite: Commerce 25. 

Basic accounting theory with emphasis on the various form- «.f 
business organization, assets, liabilities and reserves. 

Commerce 27 - Business Law (5-0-5). Winter. 

Contracts: offer and acceptance consideration, performance, rights 
of third parties and discharge. Agency: creation of an agency, powers. 
liabilities of principal and agent. Negotiable instruments: elements of 

negotiability, endorsement, and transfer, liabilities of parties, discharge. 

Commerce 28 - Business Laic l 5-0-5 l . Spring. Prerequisite: Com- 
merce 27. 

Partnership: formation, powers, liabilities of partners, termination. 
Corporation: formation, powers, rights of security holders, types of 
securities. Sales: vesting of title, warrants, remedies. 

ECONOMICS 

Economics 21 - Principles of Economics (5-0-5 l. Fall and Summer. 

A study of the principles behind the economic institutions of the 
present time and an examination of some of the economic problems 
in the modern world. 

Economics 24 - Problems of Economics 1 5-0-5 1 . Spring. Prere- 
quisite: Economics 21. 

A study of economic problems based upon the principles studied in 
Economics 21. 

ENGINEERING 

Engineering 11 - Engineering Drawing i 0-6-3 I . Fall. 

Topics of study include lettering, the use of the instruments, ortho- 
graphic projection, auxiliary views, section, pictorial representations. 

Engineering 12 - Engineering Drawing (0-6-3). Winter. Prere- 
quisite: Engineering 11. 

Topics of study include sections, dimensions, limit dimensions. 
threads, and fastenings, shop processes, technical, sketching, working 
drawings, pencil tracing on paper, reproduction processes. 



C01 RSE DESCRIPTIONS 



Engineering 13 - Engineering Drawing (0-6-3). Spring. Prerequisite 
Engineering 12. 



Topics of stud) include technical sketching <>f piping and littin^- 
irking drawings, ink tracing <>n cloth, world 
semblies and assemblies from working drawings. 



working drawings, ink tracing <>n cloth, working drawings from as- 



Engineering 21 - Descriptive Geometry (0-3-1 >. Fall. Prerequisite: 
Engineering 11. Not offered in L950. 

Topics «>f stud) include the solution of problems involving points, 

lines and planes 1>\ au\iliar\ \ iew methods. Practical applications are 
emphasized. 

Engineering 22 - Descriptive Geometry (0-3-1). Winter. Not of- 
fered' in 1951. 

A continuation of subjects studied in Engineering 21 including solu- 
tions 1>\ rotation methods, simple intersections, the development of 
surfaces. 

Engineering 23 - Descriptive Geometry (0-3-1 I. Spring. Not offered 
in 1951. 

Topics studied include the intersection of surfaces: warped surfaces. 
Practical appliances are emphasized. 

Engineering 26 - I'lane Surveying (1-3-2). Spring. Prerequisite: 
Mathematics 17. 

Theory of practice in chaining, differential and profile leveling, 
traversing, topographic surveying, reduction and plotting of field notes 
and mapping. 

ENGLISH 
English In - (3-0-3). 

A basic course in the fundamentals of reading, writing, and speaking 
English. 

English 11 - Freshman English (3-0-3). Fall and Spring. 

This course covers a review of punctuation and the fundamentals of 
grammar, theme writing, and vocabulary building. Also the student 
reads and discusses selections from the work of several of the most 
prominent literary figures of the Western World. 

English 12 - Continuation of English 11 - 13-0-3). Fall. Winter and 
Summer. 

English 13 - Continuation of English 12 - (3-0-3). Winter. Spring 
and Summer. 



36 AllMSTK ONG COLLEGE 

In English 1 1-12-13 selections from the works of the following author- 
will be read: Homer, Sophocles, Chaucer, Montaigne, Cellini, Voltaire, 
Checkov, Hardy, as ivell as those of certain English Romantic poets. 

English 2() - (.(imposition (5-0-5). Fall. 

\ genera] review of grammar, composition, and vocabulary. The 

student will have practice in the writing of themes, report- and business 
letter-. Several hooks will be assigned for reading and discussion. 

English 21 - Surrey of World Literature i 3-1 >-.'> i . Fall and Spring. 

This course is designed to give the student a knowledge of the prin- 
cipal works of certain major writers. The student reads in some detail 
several hundred pages from the works of selected authors whose thought 
or st\le has been of world-wide significance. The last third of the 
course deals with modern trends in literature and thought. At intervals, 
students are asked to write papers, and emphasis is constantly placed 
on the improvement of the student's ability to express himself. 

English 22 - Continuation of English 21 (3-0-3). Fall. Winter and 
Summer. 

English 23 - Continuation of English 22 ( 3-0-3 1 . Winter. Spring 
and Summer. 

In English 21-22-23 selections from the works of the following authors 
will be read: Shakespeare. Milton. Goethe. Keats. Whitman. Ibsen: 
also selections from the Bible. The last quarter will be devoted to a 
consideration of representative works of contemporary writers in Eng- 
land and America. 

English 24 - An Introduction to Poetry (3-0-3). Not offered in 1951. 

A stud\ of the various types and forms of poetry with special em- 
phasis on the works of the more recent British and American poets. 

English 25 - American Literature (5-0-5). Not offered in 1951. 

A survey of American literature and culture. In this course the 
student reads somewhat fully from works of a comparatively small 
number of notable and representative American writers. This course is 
primarily devoted to reading and discussion, but each student is asked 
also to select one particular period or author for concentration, making 
reports and writing papers in that phase of the work. 

English 26 - Advanced Composition (5-0-5). Winter. 

Advanced writing practice-. The course is designed to equip the 
student to express his idea- in clear, well-organized and interesting 



( 01 RSE DESCRIPTIONS 



prose. Various techniques of composition arc considered, but the main 
portion «»f the course is devoted to the writing and re-writing <>f ex- 
position. 

English 27 - Reading Modern Drama (5-0-5). Spring. 

Students will participate in class reading and discussion of selected 
dramas. The plays will not be acted. The course is expected to im- 
prove tlic student's diction and reading. 

English 2!! - Public Speaking (5-0-5). Winter. 

Fundamental principles involved in group discussion and the prep- 
aration and deliver) of original speeches for formal and informal 
occasions. 

FINE ARTS 

Art 11 - Creative Art (2-6-5). Winter. 

Drawing, art principles and design with work in other media at the 
discretion of the instructor. Some application will he made to poster- 
making, lettering and everyday life needs. 

Drama 11 I 3-4-5 I. Fall. Not offered 1950. 

\ study of modern theatre practice, both technical and administrative. 
In the laboratory students will become a part of an active producing 
company. Plays will be selected, cast, directed, designed, lighted and 
costumed by students, and will be performed before invited audiences. 
The group will work directly with the Savannah Playhouse. 

Drama 12 (3-4-5). Winter. Not offered 1951. 

Continuation of Drama 11. Students encouraged to specialize in 
one of the various departments of production. No prerequisites. 

Drama 13 (3-4-5). Spring. Not offered 1951. 

Special emphasis on acting. 

Music 11 - Elementary Theory and Sii^ht-Rcadinp (5-0-5). Fall. 

A course designed to teach the student to read music at sight and to 
understand the fundamental principles of music theory. Melodic dicta- 
tion, melody writing and an introduction to elementary harmony are 
included. 

Music 12 - Advanced Theory and Si tilit -Reading I 5-0-5 I . Winter. 
Prerequisite: Music 11. 

A continuation of Music 11. including melodic and harmonic compo- 
sition. 



38 \RMSTRONG COLLEGE 



\iusic 20 - (treat Music I 5-0-5 I . Spring. 

\ course designed t<> help the reader understand and enjo) great 
music. Several works will be analyzed in detail as to form, harmon) 
and Btructure. \ text will be used for factual background, class time 
being concentrated on brief exposition of themes followed l>\ listening 
to records. Classic, romantic and modern composers will be studied. 

FOREIGN LANG1 \GI-> 

French 

French 11-12 - Elementary French (5-0-5). Fall and Winter. 

A course for beginners. Emphasis is placed on the spoken language. 
Grammar and reading are included in the course. Practice with records 
is required outside of regular class hours. 

French 21 - Intermediate French (5-0-5). Fall and Spring. Prere- 
quisite: Two quarters of college French or two years of high school 
French. 

Review grammar, oral practice, reading of selected texts. 

French 22 - Intermediate French, continued (5-0-5). Winter. Pre- 
requisite: Three quarters of college French or three years of high 
school French. 

Further reading of texts, oral and composition practice. 

French 23 - Introduction to Literature l 5-0-5 I . Spring. Prerequisite: 
French 22. Not offered in 1950-51. 

A survey course with particular emphasis on the nineteenth century. 
Written and oral reports on collateral readings. 

French 24 - French Classic Drama (5-0-51. Spring. Prerequisite: 
French 22. 

Selected pla\s of Corneille. Moliere and Racine arc studied. Four 
pla\s are read in class and four plays read as collateral. 

German 

German 11-12 - Elementary German (5-0-5). Fall and Winter. No! 

offered in 1050-51. 

Drill in fundamentals. Grammar, oral and written practice, earl] 
reading of selected material in German. Second part is devoted to 
additional grammar and conversation. 

German 21 - Review Grammar (5-0-5). Spring. Not offered in 1951. 



CO! RSE DESCRIPTIONS \9 



SPANISH 

Spanish Ll-12 - Elementary Spanish (5-0-5). Fall and Winter. 

These courses arc for the purpose of providing the student with the 
elements of Spanish b) reading, composition and speaking. 

Spanish 21 - Intermediate Spanish (5-0-5). Fall and Spring 

Grammar review, composition and selected prose readings. 

Spanish 22 - idvanced Spanish (5-0-5). Winter. 

The purpose of thi> course is to increase the student's facility in 
writing and speaking Spanish. Selected masterpieces of Spanish liter- 
ature are read. 

Spanish 23 - Commercial Spanish (5-0-5). Spring. Not offered in 

L950. 

\ stud\ of business letters and forms used by the Spanish-speaking 
world and of the vocabulary of trade, travel and communication. 

Spanish 24 - Modern Prose Readings (5-0-5). Spring. 

This course provides intensive reading of novels, plays and short 
stories of nineteenth and twentieth century Spanish and Latin-American 
authors. 

HISTORY 

History 11 - An Historical Introduction to Contemporary Civilization 
(3-0-3). Fall and Spring. 

This course comprises a chronological survey of the main currents 
of political, social, religious and philosophical thought in Western Civili- 
zation from the period of the sixth century in Greece to the present time. 

History 12 - A continuation oj History 11 (3-0-31. Fall, Winter and 
Summer. 

History 13 - A continuation oj History 12 (3-0-3). Winter. Spring 
and Summer. 

In addition to a chronological treatment of events studied in the 
above courses, the dynamics of Western Civilization are studied in 
works of the following authors: Plato, Lucretius. St. Augustine. Dante. 
Machiaveili, Descartes, Locke. Swift. Rousseau. Adam Smith. Ricardo. 
Malthus. Bentham. Carlyle. Marx. Shaw and Hersey. 

History 11-12-13 are required of all students seeking an Associate 
degree from Armstrong College and are designed to be complementan 
with English 11-12-13. 



4k) ARMSTRONG COLLEGE 

History 11 - Latin American (5-0-5). Spring. 

This course deals with the colonial. re\ olutionan and recent develop* 
merits in the countries of Hispanic America. 

History 25 - Recent European History i 5-0-5 i. Spring. 

This course is designed to provide an opportunity for detailed >tud\ 
of major national and international developments in European affairs 
from about L870 to the present time. Special emphasis is de\ oted to 
the First World War and new developments in Europe following that 
war and the complex of world events which preceded the Second World 
War. 

History 26 - Recent American History (.5-0-5). Fall and Winter. 

This course has as its purpose the examination of the most important 
events and movements, political, social and cultural, in American life 
from about 1900 to the present time. 



HOME ECONOMICS 

Home Economics 10 - Orientation (3-0-3). Fall. 

An introduction to home economics that gives the student some idea 
of the vocational opportunities in this field so she will be able to take 
better advantage of her course of study in college. 

Home Economics 2n - Nutrition and Food Preparation (3-2-4). Lab- 
oratory fee, $4.00 

The fundamental principles of nutrition and food preparations are 
considered. The nutrition requirements of children and of adults are 
compared. Special attention is given to the nutrition requirements of 
childhood and pregnancy. 

Home Economics 11 - Clothing (2-6-5). Fall and Spring. Labora- 
tory fee. S1.00. 

A study of clothing to suit the individual needs and the application 
of art principles to dress, together with problems in clothing construc- 
tion in laboratory periods will be pursued. 

Home Economics 12 - Foods (3-4-5). Fall and Spring. Laboratory 

fee, $7.00. 

\n introduction to the basic food and family meal service. Complete 
meals are prepared and served in each laboratory period. 

Home Economics 13 - Catering (2-6-5). Winter. Laboratory fee, 
$7.00. Prerequisite: Home Economics 12. or consent of instructor. 



C01 RSE DESCRIPTIONS II 



\ more advanced approach to food preparation and selection. Poods 
arc purchased and prepared for special occasions, Buch a9 formal din- 
ners, luncheons, receptions and teas. 

Home Economics -I - II tunc Furnishing I t-3-5). Fall. Laboratory 
fee, $2.00. Prerequisite: \n II or consenl of the instructor. 

\ Stud) of the home from the standpoint of famil) needs. Roth the 
interior and exterior of the home are considered with reference to such 
topics a> home lighting, wall treatments, floor coverings, and Storage 
space. Period st\ les of furniture from those of ancient times to the 
present arc studied. 

Home Economics 22 - Nutrition (5-0-5). Spring. Prerequisite: 

Chemistr) II or 12. or consent of the instructor. 

\ consideration of the laws governing the food requirements of 
individuals for maintenance and growth of the body. The food nu- 
trients and their contributions to the daily dietar\ are studied. 

Home Economics 23 - Advanced Clothing (2-6-5). Winter. Labora- 
tory fee. $1.00. 

Lectures cover garment selection and wardrobe planning and an in- 
troduction to the study of textiles. Laboratory periods are devoted to 
developing more advanced techniques in clothing; construction. 



JOURNALISM 

Journalism 11 - I 1-2-2 I. Fall. 

Students gain practical experience in working out editorial, mechan- 
ical and business problems dealing with a publication. 

Journalism 12 - A continuation of Journalism 11 (1-2-2). Winter. 
Journalism 13 - A continuation of Journalism 12 (1-2-2). Spring. 



MATHEMATICS 

Mathematics 11 - Basic Mathematics (3-0-3). Fall and Spring. 

Mathematics 11. 12. and 13 is a terminal sequence, giving informa- 
tion about the genesis and development of mathematics. An introduc- 
tion to inductive and deductive methods: Euclidean and non-Euclidean 
systems: theory of arithmetic numbers, operations and measurements: 
and logarithms. 

Mathematics 12 • Basic Mathematics (3-0-3). Winter and Summer. 
Prerequisite: Mathematics 11. 



42 ARMSTRONG COLLEGE 

A continuation of the course started in Mathematics 11; variation: 
interest and annuities: progressions of numbers; combinations and 
probability; functional relationships: and the binomial theorem. 

Mathematics 13 - Basic Mathematics I 3-0-3). Spring and Fall. Pre- 
requisite: Mathematics 12. 

Advanced circular functions: equations; common curves; and sta- 
tistical concepts. 

Mathematics 16 - College Algebra (5-0-5). Fall and Spring. Prere- 
quisite: Two years of high school algehra and one of Plane Geometry. 
(Students with insufficient preparation may audit Mathematics 16). 

A course in advanced algehra planned for mathematics or science 
majors. The course consists of functions and graphs: logarithms: 
linear and quadratic equations; the binomial theorem: complex num- 
bers and the elementary theory of equations. 

Mathematics 17 - Trigonometry (5-0-5). Fall and Winter. Prere- 
quisite: Mathematics 16. 

A course covering the solution of the right and general triangle: the 
general solution of trigonometric equations: trigonometric identities: 
polar coordinates and the use of the slide rule. 

Mathematics 18 - Plane Analytic Geometry ( 5-0-5 1 . Winter and 
Spring. Prerequisite: Mathematics 17. 

Analytic geometry of the point, line and circle: elementary conic 
sections: polar coordinates: transcendental curves and transformation 
of coordinates. 

Mathematics 21 - Differential Calculus (5-0-5). Fall. Prerequisite: 
Mathematics 13. 

Theorv of differentation. with application to tangents: maxima and 
minima: rates: curvature: velocity and acceleration: approximations: 
and Newton's method. 

Mathematics 22 - Integral Calculus (5-0-5). Winter. Prerequisite: 
Mathematics 21. 

Formulas and methods of integration: single integration applied to 
areas and lengths: volumes and surfaces of revolution; centroids and 

moments of inertia: pressure and work. 

Mathematics 23 - Differential and Integral Calculus (5-0-5). Spring. 
Prerequisite: Mathematics 22. Not offered in 1950-51. 



CO! RSE DESCRIPTIONS I I 



The law of the mean and indeterminate forms: Beries, with applica- 
tions; partial and total derivatives, with applications; essentials of solid 
analytic geometry; multiple integration, applied to areas, volumes, 

centroids and moments of inertia. 



MUSIC 

I See Fine Arts I 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

Physical Education LI - Conditioning Course (0-3-1). Fall. 

Consists in calisthenics: stunts and tumbling: lifts and carries; road 
work, dual comhatives: and simple games. 

Physical Education 12 - Team Sports I 0-3-1 I. Winter. 

Consists of elementary basketball, soccer, or speedball. 

Physical Education 13 - Elementary Swimming (0-3-1). Spring. 

Physical Education 18 - Advanced Basketball for Men ( 0-3-1 1 . Winter. 

Physical Education 20 - First Aid and Safety Education (4-0-3). 

The American Red Cross standard course in first aid is followed by 
a broad consideration of the opportunities for safety teaching in the 
school program. 

Physical Education 21 - Elementary Tennis (0-3-1). Fall. 

Physical Education 22 - Elementary Boxing for Men (0-3-1 >. Winter. 

Physical Education 23 - Senior Life Saving and Instructors' Course 
in Swimming for Men (0-5-2). Spring. 

Physical Education 24 - Boxing for Teachers (2-3-2). Winter. 

Physical Education 25 - Folk Rhythms (0-3-1). Fall. 

Physical Education 26 - Modern Dance for Women (0-3-1 ). Winter. 

Physical Education 27 - Tap Dance for Women (0-3-1). Winter. 

Physical Education 28 - Adult Recreative Sports (0-3-1). Spring. 

Consists of passive, semi-active, and active games and sports which 
have carry-over value for later life. 

Physical Education 29 - Folk Rhythms for Teachers (2-3-2). Fall. 
Physical Education 30 - Archery (0-3-1). Spring. 



44 ARMSTRONG COLLEGE 

PHYSK - 
Physics iO - Physics Survey (5-2-6). Spring. Laboratory fee, $2.50. 
\ stud) of the fundamentals of physics. Emphasis will be placed 

«»:i the theories nece>sar\ to explain heat, electricit) and mechanics as 

used in the home. 

Physics 11 - General Physics (5-2-6). Fall. Laboratory fee, $2.50. 

\ stud) of mechanics and heat, force, motion, simple machine.-, the 
mechanics of fluids, and heat. 

Physics L2 - General Physics (5-2-6). Winter. Laboratory fee, $2.50. 

A study of electricity, sound and light, electrostatics, magnetism, and 
simple circuits. 

Physics 21 - Mechanics 1.5-3-6). Fall. Not offered 1950. Labora- 
tory fee. $2.50. Prerequisite: Mathematics lo. (Mathematics 21 should 
he taken concurrently . I 

A study of statics, kinetics, elasticity, hydrostatics, mechanics of 
gases, fluids in motion, surface tension and capillarity. The theor\ of 
errors will be included in the laboratory work. 

Physics 22 - Electricity (5-3-6). Winter. Not offered 1951. Lab- 
oratory fee. $2.50. Prerequisite: Physics 21 and Mathematics 21. 

A study of magnetism, electrostatics, batteries, electrical measure- 
ments, electromagnetism. induced currents, electrical machinery, elec- 
trical oscillations, and thermo-and photo-electric emmission. 

Physics 23 - Heat, Light and Sound (5-3-6). Spring. Not offered 
1951. Laboratory fee. $2.50. Prerequisite: Physics 22 and Mathe- 
matics 22. 

A study of thermal expansion heat measurements, change of state, 
heat and energy, propagation of heat, production and transmission of 
sound waves, reflection and refraction of light, dispersion, interference 
and polarization of light. 

POLITICAL SCI FACE 

Political Science 13 - Government in the I nited States (5-0-5). Fall 
and Winter. 

A stud\ is made of the structure, theory, workings of the national 
government in the I nited States and some of the major problems of 
the -tate and local government. The course show- how developmental 
practice has arrived at our government as it stands today. 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS [5 

PSYCHOLOGY 

Psychology Ln - (3-0-3). 

This course Is an introduction to the stud) of human behavior with 
emphasis on the underlying principles <>f mental adjustments. The im- 
portance of the nurse's <'\\n personality is stressed. 

Psychology 21 Introductory Psychology (5-0-5). Fall and Spring. 

\n introductory course in psychology, including discussions of learn- 
ing, memory, behavior, psycho-biological relationships, morale and 

motivation. The facts and principles from scientific research in psychol- 
ogy are applied to the student in his present u>" of college experience. 

Psychology 22 - Social Psychology 15-0-5). Winter. Prerequisite: 
Psychology 21. 

This course is an introduction to the psychology of groups. An 
analysis is made of the psychological and socio-cultural motivation 
of the individual from infancy to adulthood from the standpoint of 
his group relationships. Special attention is given to a study of leader- 
ship, the development of radical and conservative qualities, propaganda, 
war. facism. communism, delinquency and public opinion. 

Psychology 23 - Child Psychology (5-0-5). Spring. Prerequisite: 
Psychology 21. 

A study of the developmental factors operating in a child's experience 
that make for, or interfere with, effective expression of his capacities 
and effective adjustment to life situations. Sources are drawn from 
experimental research and from the findings of analytical psychology . 

Psychology 25 - Psychology of Adjustment (5-0-5). Winter. 

In this course emphasis is placed on the types of adjustment, the 
development and measurement of personality traits and techniques of 
mental health. 

PUBLIC SPEAKING 
(See English 28) 

SOCIOLOGY 

Sociology 2n - ( 3-0-3 I . 

This course considers (1) the principles of sociology; (2) the nurse 
as a citizen of the community and as a professional worker: (3) the 
importance of the hospital among the social agencies in the community: 
(4) the patient in the hospital coming from the family and returning 
to the family. 



46 ARMSTRONG COLLEGE 

Sociology 20 - Introductory Sociology (5-0-5). Fall. 
\ stud) «>f the principles of social organizations in American culture 

based <>n scientific studies of groups, "races." population and of the 
institutionalized functions of society. 

Sociology 21 - Marriage and the Family i 5-0-5 I . Winter and Spring. 

A studs of famil) backgrounds, preparation for marriage, marriage 
interaction and family administration. famil\ economics, problems of 
parenthood, famil) disorganization. A stud\ of the famil) in the 
post-war period and present trends in family life are included. 

SPANISH 

(See Foreign Languages) 






INDEX i: 



\ Book IK 

Admission t<> ( la-- 17 

\.lmi— ion to College K 

Administration 3 

Advanced Standing 9 

\un- K 

Art, Course Description 37 

Assemblies 19 

Associate in Arts 21-22 

Athletics 15 

Attendance 19 

Audio-Visual Instruction 13 

Biology, Course Descriptions 29 

Calender L950-195] 2 

Certificate, Admission bj 9 

Chemistry, Course Descriptions 30 

Chemistry, Concentration in 23 

Clubs 15 

( lollege ( iommission 3 

Commencement Exercises 20 

( lommerce, Course Descriptions 31-34 

Commerce, Business Administration. Concentration in 22-23 

Commerce Secretarial, Concentration in 23 

Community Guidance Center 12 

Core Curriculum 21 

Counseling 11-21 

Curricula 21-2K 

Course Load 17 

Course Descriptions 29-46 

Dean's List 18 

Degrees, Programs of Study for 22-27 

Dormitories 14 

Drama ( Also see Savannah Playhouse ) 37 

Economics, Course Descriptions 34 

Employment 14 

Engineering, Course Descriptions 34-35 

Engineering, Freshman 27 

English, Course Descriptions 35-37 

Evening College (See University of Georgia Off-Campus Center) 13 

Examination. Admission by 9 

Faculty 5 

Fees 10 

Fine Arts, Course Descriptions 37 

Foreign Languages, Course Descriptions 38-39 

French, Course Descriptions 38 

German, Course Descriptions 38 

Glee Club 16 

Grades 18 

Graduation. Requirements for 20 

History of College 7 

History, Course Descriptions 39-40 



48 ARMSTRONG COLLEGE 

Holidays 2 

Homecoming 13 

Home Economics, Course Descriptions 40-41 

Home Economics, C entration in 24 

Honors 18 

index 17-48 

intramural Sports 15 

Journalism, Course Descriptions 41 

Libera] \n-. ( loncentration in 24-25 

Library 12 

Loans 14 

Mathematics, Course Descriptions 41-43 

Music, Course Descriptions 37-38 

Night School (See University of Georgia Off-Campus Center) 13 

N arses, Program 28 

Open House 13 

Organization of College 7 

Physical Education, Course Descriptions 43 

Physical Education, Concentration in 25 

Physical Examination 17 

Physics, Course Descriptions 44 

Placement Service 14 

Political Science. Course Description 44 

Pre-Dental, Concentration in 26 

Pre-Medical, Concentration in 26 

Psychology, Course Descriptions 44 

Publications 15 

Public Speaking. Course Description 37 

Recommendations 20 

Refunds 11 

Reports 19 

Requirements for Admission 9-10 

Savannah Playhouse 16 

Scholarships 14 

Secretarial Training 23 

Sociology, Course Descriptions 45-46 

Spanish. Course Descriptions 39 

Special Students, \dmission of 10 

Stenographic Training 27 

Student Activities 11 

Student Assistants and Associates 14 

Student Center 11 

Student Conduct 17 

Student Objectives 21 

Summer Session 2 

Testing Program for Freshmen 8 

Transfer Student- 9 

Transfer to Other institutions 21 

I niversitj of Georgia Off-Campus Center 13 

V eterans, Vdmission of 10 

Withdrawal 19 



ARMSTRONG COLLEGE 
I IDDAnw 



,4^ 







Sfefi 



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i 








GEORGIA 



For Reference 



Not to be taken from this room 



L951 - 1952 



FALL 



WIMKK 



SPRING 



-I MMKI! 



liullcliii llf 



Armstrong College 



A Junior College Maintained 
by the City of Savannah 




18343 



Membership In 

American Association of Junior Colleges 
Southern Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools 
Association of Georgia Coll* _ 
Georgia Association of Junior Colli 



VOLUME XVI 



NUMBER 1 



ARMSTRONG COLLEGE 

UBRARY 



CALENDAR FOR L951-1952 



I \LL Ql Mil I i: 



Freshman testing and Sophomore counselini 

Freshman ( >i ientation 

Registration 

( lasses begin 

I asl da) to register for credit 
Mid-term reports due 
Thanksgh ing Holiday s 

_ i~t i ation 

Examinations 

Parade and Basketball Game 

Homecoming Reception and Dance 

Christmas Holidays 



5< ptembex 17 

September 18-22 

September 21 

5< ptembei 25 

October 5 

October 26 

November 22-25 

I )- 1 > mber 5-7 

December 12-14 

December 15 

December IT 

iber 17-January 1 



WINTER QUARTER 

Registration January 2 

Classes begin January 3 

Last day to register for credit January 11 

Mid-term reports due February 1 

Pre-Registration March 3-5 

Examinations March 12-14 

Spring Holidays March 15-23 

SPRING QUARTER 

Registration March 24 

Classes begin March 25 

Last day to register for credit April 4 

Mid-term reports due April 25 

Pre-registration Summer and Fall Quarters May 21-23 

Examinations June 2-4 

Sophomore Party June 6 

Sophomore-Alumni Luncheon June 7 

Graduation June 9 

SUMMER SESSION 

Registration June 16 

< lasses begin June 17 

Holiday July 4 

Examinations July 25 



SUMMER SESSION 



Registration 
Classes begin 

Holiday 

Examinations 



EVENING COLLEGE 

June 16 

June 17 

July 4 

Augu-t 27 and 29 



Administration 

THE COLLEGE COMMISSION 

Mi km in i. V. Jenkins Chairman 

Wii.i.i \ m Murphei Vice-Chairman 

James Barnett James P. Houlihan, Ex-officio 

Morris Bernstein G. Philip Morgan, Sr. 

Benjamin II. Levy, F,\-<>iii<i<> Mrs. William F. Robertson 

()u\ F. Fi lmer, Ex-officio Fred L Shearouse 

Alfred T. Vick, Ex-officio 

THE FACULTY 

Foreman M. Hawes, A. B.. M. A President 

Arthur M. Gignilliat, A. B., M. A. Director of the Evening College 
W. Orson Beecher, A. B.. M. A Dean of Students 

Barbara Cowan Anchors, A. L. A.. Armstrong College 
Assistant to the Librarian 

W. Orson Beecher, A. B.. and M. A.. Emory University: M. A. Uni- 
versity of Georgia 

Instructor in History 

Laura Blakeley, B. S., and M. A.. Peabody College 
Instructor in Mathematics 

Stephen P. Bond, Bachelor of Science and Architecture. Georgia 
Institute of Technology 

Instructor in Engineering 

Arthur M. Casper, B. S., Beloit College: M. S., University of 
Wisconsin 

Instructor in Mathematics 

Anna Cone, A. L. A., Armstrong College; B. A.. University of Georgia 
Secretary to the Dean of Students 

Anne K. Crolly, B. A., Ursuline College of New Orleans 

Assistant Registrar 



4 \l)\ll\ISTI!\Tlo\ 



William M. Dabney, \. B. and M. A.. Ph. I).. I niversit) of Virginia 
Instructor in History <m<l Political Science 

Lamar D\\i>. B. >.. I niversit) of South Carolina 

Instructor in Business idministration 

Eleanor J. Doyle, l>. S.. [mmaculata College; M. A.. Catholic I nivex- 
sit) <>f America; (Graduate Study. Tulane I niversit) 
Instructor in Spanish and Director of Publications and Publicity 

VRTHUR M. Gignilliat, A. B., and M. A.. University of Georgia 
Instructor in English 

\<>\i\ Li:i: Goodwin, A. B.. and M. A., Duke I ni\ci>ii\ 
Instructor in English 

\\ \ltkr T. Johnston, B. S., in L. S., Peabody College; M \.. Peabody 
College 

Librarian 

Margaret Spencer Lubs, B. M., Converse College: \. B., I niversit) 

of Georgia; M. A., Columbia University 
Instructor in French 

Elmo M. McCray, Jr., B. S., and M. S., University of Alabama 
Instructor in Biology 

Robert M. Mizell, Jr., B. S., University of North Carolina; M. S., 
Emory Universit\ 

Instructor in Chemistry 

Dorothy Morris, B. S., I niversit) of Tennessee 

Instructor in Physical Education 

Marjorie A. MoSLEY, Associate in Finance and Commerce, Arm- 
strong College 

Secretary to the President 

Hi\< ki.ky A. Murphy, B. A., Vanderbilt Universit\ : M. A., Columbia 
Universit) 

Instructor in English 

On Leave of Absence. 






VDMINISTR \IH>\ 



Josu R. Nelson, Graduate of Banks Secretarial School 

Bookkeeper 

Elizabeth Pound, Georgia State College for Women, State Teachers 
College 

Director of Student Center 

Irvine \. Smith. \. B., and M. \ . I niversit) of North Carolina 

Instructor in English and Director of the Armstrong College 
MASQUERS 

\w< ^ Page Smith, B. M.. Eastman School of Music of the I niversitj 
of Rochester; M. \.. I niversit) of North Carolina 

Director of Glee Club and Instructor in Music 

Margaret Fortsois Stephens. \. 15.. LL. I>. and M. \.. I ni\n-it\ of 
Georgia; Certificate from the Sorbonne, Paris. France 
Instructor in English 

Dorothy M. THOMPSON, A. B., Monmouth College: M \.. North- 
western I Diversity; Certificate of Psychiatric Social Work: Wot- 
ern Reserve University 

Instructor in Psychology and Sociology 

•CARMEN Torrie, B. S., Concord College; M. S.. I Diversity of Ten- 
nessee 
Director of Athletics and Instructor in Physical Education 

Helen C. Wolfe, B. S., Columbia University 

Instructor in Home Economics 

Gladys Nichols Zilch. Diploma from the Gregg School of Chicago 
Instructor in Commerce 

*Ou leave of absence with the Armed Forces. 



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Genera] Informal ion 



I \\^ rom \\i> ( )i;<. \m/ \ i ion 

Armstrong College was founded on May 27. L935, l>\ tin- Mayoi 
and Udermen of the Cit) of Savannah to meet a long-fell need for a 
junior college. The first college building was tin- tnagnificanl home of 

the late George F. Armstrong, a gifl to the cit) from his widow and 

bis daughter. The former home, now called the Armstrong Building, 
i- an Imposing Structure of Italian Renaissance architecture; inside, 
its Bpacious looms and marble halls lend an air of dignity, while outside 
it i> one of the most beautiful college buildings in the South. 

Over the \ears. through private donation and public appropriation. 
the campus has been enlarged until now it includes four additional 
buildings: the Lane Building, a gift of the late Mills B. Lane, prominent 
banker: John W. Hunt Memorial Building in which are located the 
Student Center, the Home Economics Department, the Women's Lounge, 
the Dancing Studio, and the Music Room; Herschel V. Jenkins Hall. 
which contains the auditorium, theater for the Armstrong College 
Masquers, and classrooms; and Thomas Gamble Hall, site of science 
lecture rooms and laboratories. 

Three of the buildings face forty-acre Forsyth Park, the most beau- 
tiful park in the city; the other two face Monterey Square, one of the 
carefully planned squares for which Savannah is famous. 

Hodgson Hall, across from Forsyth Park on Whitaker Street, con- 
tains the college library as well as the Library of the Georgia Historical 
Society, to which Armstrong students have access. 

The college is under the control of a commission of six members, 
appointed by the Mayor. In addition, the commission includes as 
ex-officio members the Mayor, the Chairman of the Chatham County 
Board of Education, the Chairman of the County Commissioners, the 
Superintendent of the Board of Education, and the President of the 
Savannah Chamber of Commerce. 

Except for the war years, enrollment has shown a steady increase 
until the present student body numbers approximately four hundred. 
As need arises, the curriculum is enlarged and modified to meet new 
demands. 



8 ARMSTRONG COLLEGE 

Vims 

The college seeks t<» Berve the community 1>\ <_ r i\ing the men and 

women who attend it> classes a better understanding of the world in 

which thej live and the experience of adapting knowledge to meet the 
obligations and responsibilities of citizenship. 

The -Indent ma\ complete one or more <>f the following 
specific objectives: 

1. Receive additional liberal education stressing how to 
live more abundanth : 

2. Complete the freshman and sophomore years of the 
four-year senior college program Leading to the bac- 
calaureate degree; 

3. Finish two years of pre-professional work leading to- 
ward medicine, dentistry, law. home economics, the 
ministry and other professions: 

4. Graduate from a semi-professional program, prepared 
to go into business or industry. 

The college awards the degree of Associate in Arts to students 
completing an approved program. 

Admission to the College 
(For dates see calendar on page 2) 

A student planning to enter Armstrong should obtain from the 
Registrar an "Application for Admission Card." The student should 
complete this form and return to the Registrar. REQUEST THE HIGH 
SCHOOL PRINCIPAL. OR THE COLLEGE REGISTRAR (in the case 
of a transfer student). TO SEND A TRANSCRIPT OF CREDITS to 
the Registrar. Armstrong College, Savannah. Georgia. 

Having checked the student's records for compliance with the mini- 
mum requirements for admission, the Registrar will send a notice to 
the student that he has been admitted t<» the college, together with cer- 
tain physical examination forms which must be completed and returned 
before the student can complete registration. The applicant will be 
notified of the dates of the next testing program. These tests do not 
affect a student's entering Armstrong, but will enable the counseling 
staff to assist him in -electing a program of study upon entrance. 
STUDENTS \Ri: REQUIRED TO TAKE THESE TEST MEASURE- 
MENTS BEFORE REGISTRATION. 



GENER \l INFORM \TI<>\ 



Ki qi iki \n n rs For Admission 

B1 I l RTIFICATE 

1. \ candidate for admission to Armstrong College l>\ certificate 
musl be a graduate of an accredited high school with sixteen units 

of credit. 

2. N<> subject-matter units an- prescribed. The high school pro- 
gram should be of such nature as to give satisfactory preparation for 
beginning college studies. Subjects which ma) be expected to contribute 

to this end are English composition, literature, natural science, histor) 

and other social studies, foreign languages, and mathematics. The 

right is reserved to reject an\ applicant whose high school program 
does not indicate adequate preparation for college work. 

o. \ record of high school credits earned b) the applicant should 
he made out on the proper forms l»\ an official of the high school and 
mailed directl) to the office of the Registrar. This certificate becomes 
the property of the college and cannot he returned to the applicant. 

\ Three units in mathematics and one in physics or its equivalent 
i> pre-requisite for admission to the freshman class in engineering. 



BY EX \\ll\ \Tin\s 

Students beyond high school age. who do not need the abo\ e re- 
quirements for admission by certificate, may take the General Educa- 
tional Development tests (high school level) at the local Communit) 
Guidance Center. The student will be admitted to college on the basis 
of his score. Entrance examinations should be completed at least one 
week before registration. Additional information ma\ be secured from 
the Registrar's office. 



ADMISSION TO ADVANCED STANDING 

Advanced credit will be allowed for work done in other institutions 
of proper rank and standing and for schools and experiences in the 
Armed Services. Only 10 per cent of the total number of hours trans- 
ferred will be accepted in "D" grades. To receive a diploma from 
Armstrong College, a student must be in attendance the two quarters 
preceding graduation, making a "C" average enrolled for a normal 
load, and. in addition, must satisfy the requirements of a particular 
course of study. Adults (students over -I years of age) may receive 
credit for certain college work on the basis of the General Educational 
Development tests at the junior college level. 



10 ARMSTRONG COLLEGE 

ADMISSION 01 \ i I i i; INS 01 WORLD w \i; n 

Armstrong College will accepl veterans who are nol high school 
graduates if t h « i r official GED test records in the local Community 
Guidance Center -how scores thai indicate the applicant's abilit) to 
<l<» college work. Man\ students have attended Armstrong under the 
provisions of Public Laws U> or 346. Certificates of eligibility should 
be secured from the Veterans Administration prior to registration. 

ADMISSION 01 SPE< I M. ST1 DK\ rS 

Adults desiring to enroll in courses for their intrinsic value but 
not desiring transfer credit ma\ be enrolled as special students. Re- 
quirements pertaining to entrance examinations, physical examinations 

and physical education courses do not apply to these student-. 

Fees 
Tuition will he charged as follow-: 

For 12 quarter hours or niorefl|jBPR $55 00 

lor each quarter hour less than 12 quarter lioiir-J(i!§flre ^1.60 



\ll veterans must present a certificate of eligihility the first time 
the) register at Armstrong College. A veteran who has not obtained 
a certificate of eligibility prior to registration will be required to pav 
cash, which may be refunded by the Business Office upon receipt 
of the certificate. A veteran who enrolls for a laboratory science is 
required to pa\ his own breakage deposit, since the amount paid will 
be refunded if he does not break any laboratory equipment. 

A student activit) fee of $5.00 per quarter will be charged all 
students. This fee will entitle the student to subscriptions to the 
'Geechee. the college annual, and other publications and admission 
to college-sponsored dances and membership in the Armstrong \thletie 
Club. Film Club and student theatre. 

Students taking a laboratory work will he required to pa\ a fee for 
materials and equipment. This fee is indicated in the description of 
courses found under "Course Descriptions" elsewhere in this bulletin. 

In addition to the above, students taking either Biology, Physics "i 
Chemistry will he required to purchase a laboratory breakage card for 
$5.00. This card shall be presented to the instructor when material is 
broken and the proper amount will be recorded. \t the end of the year. 
the card should be returned to the Business Office for refund of an\ re- 
maining amount. In ease of loss, a new card must be purchased. Re- 
funds cannot be made until cards have been signed b) science in- 
structors. 



GENERAL INFORMA TION II 

III I I NDS 

Refunds of fees and tuition will be made ONL1 upon written 

application for withdrawal from school. No refunds will be made t<> 
students dropping a course. Schedule of refunds i> given In-low: 

// ithdrawal (lairs Amount <ii Refunds 

Fall Quarter, 1951 Sept. 24, 25, 26, 27. 2H. 29 80' ;. of feea paid 

Oct. 1. 2, 3, t. 5, 6, 607 of feea paid 

Oct. B, 9, 10. 11. 12. L3 407> of fees paid 

Oct. 15, 16, 17. IK. 19. 20 20^ of fees paid 

Winter Quarter, 1952 Jan. 2. 3. 1. 5. 7. 8 807r of fees paid 

Jan. 9. 10. 11. 12. 14. 15 60 r 7 of feea paid 

Jan. 16. 17. 18. 19. 21. 22 407o of fees paid 

Jan. 23. 24. 25. 26. 28. 29 20% of fees paid 

Spring Quarter. 1952 Mar. 20. 21. 22. 24. 25. 26 807c of fees paid 

Mar. 27. 28. 29. 31 607c of fees paid 

\pril 1. 2 607c of fees paid 

\pril 3. 1. 5. 7. 8. 9 407c of fees paid 

April 10. 11. 12. 14, 15, 16 207* of fees paid 

Summer, 1952 June 16. 17. 18 807c of fees paid 

June 19. 20. 21 607c of fees paid 

June 22. 23. 24 407o of fees paid 

June 25. 26. 27 207c of fees paid 



Counseling 

The Counseling service of Armstrong College, in connection with 
the office of the Dean of Students, offers help in solving problems con- 
nected with the student's pursuit of the college program. The counselor 
has special training which enables him to offer individual, confidential, 
non-disciplinary help at the student's own request. 

Students are urged to request help from their instructors when the 
difficulty is one concerned with the subject itself and having no compli- 
cations. The areas with which the counselor is usually concerned are 
choices of vocation, the planning of work in college, study habits gen- 
erally and personal adjustment to college life. Those problems which 
do not fit into these general categories either because of greater inten- 
sity or critical development are referable to community agencies outside 
the college if the student or his guardians so agree. 

The main function of the counselor is to help the student work 
out his own problem successfully, and the only administrative function 
which the counselor has is to plan with every student in advance of 
registration his work at the college. 



12 VRMSTRONG COLLEGE 



Library 

Hodgson Hall houses not onl) the library of Armstrong College, 
but also thai of tin- Georgia Historical Society. Since all honks are 
on open shelves, students have immediate access to both collection-. 
The reading room, which ha- recently been redecorated, is well lighted, 
mosl attractive and popular among the students <hn- section <»f this 
room is furnished with lounge chairs and opens into a garden, which is 
also an added attraction to man\ readers. 

The library's holdings consisl <>f a \<-r\ good collection of standard 

reference hooks and fiction totaling 10. 000 volumes. There are more 
than 100 periodical subscriptions, including seven newspapers, four of 
w hich are dailies. 

In addition to the resources of the college library, -indent- are 
encouraged to use the Savannah Public Librarx. which has a good 
reference department and much material of interest to students, includ- 
ing a large collection of fiction, government documents, microfilm 
copies of newspapers, and music records. The main buildings is on Bull 
Street and has a union catalog, listing the holdings of the Downtown 
Branch, Waters Avenue Branch, and of the Georgia Historical Society. 

The library is fortunate in being the recipient of an outstanding 
collection of history books, a gift of the late Mayor Thomas Gamble, 
of Savannah. 

Under the supervision of a trained librarian, two full-time a--i-t- 
ants, and eight student assistants, the library is open on certain 
evenings for the use of tin- night school students, and each school 
da\ from 8:30 A. M. to 5:30 P. M. 



Mental Health Clink 

The clinic is that division of the Community Guidance Center 
which has as its primarx functions the treatment of the emotional prob- 
lems of children and adults, and tin* promotion of mental health in the 
community . 

It utilize- the services of the psychiatrist, psychiatric social worker 
and psychologist who work together as a "team" in an effort to under- 
stand and treat effectivel) those individuals v\h<> suffer with mental 
illness. 

The (Minic is located in the Lane Building at :!<» West Gaston Street 
and has offices on both the main and mound floor-. 






GENERAL INFORMATION L3 

\ i in; INS ( -I [DAN( i CENTER 

The Veterans Guidance Center began operations as a vocational 
counseling service under a contract between Armstrong College and 
the Veterans Administration. I li i> contract is one of five similar ar- 
rangements in the Mate of Georgia; and it enables Armstrong to em- 
plo) a stall of professional trained personnel to help veterans with their 
vocational planning programs. I>\ the spring of L95] approximately 
5,435 veterans from a 38-count) territory had taken advantage of this 
service, which the federal government provides free of charge t<» all 
men and women who served in the I . S. Vrmed Forces during World 

War II. 

The counseling procedure consists mainl\ of helping client- dis- 
cover "i verif) their assets and limitations (through testing of mental 
ability, special aptitudes, school achievement, interest pattern, and per- 
gonal adjustment), and to relate this information ahout themselves to 
the "world of work" I through discussion, reading in occupational in- 
formation files, and conference with persons already successful in 
occupations which seem interesting to the client l . 

Vocational counseling service was extended to a limited number 
of \oung people and adults from the community -at-large on a fee basis. 
Armstrong students, as referred by the faculty Counseling Committee. 
max be accepted without charge. 

The center is located in the Lane Building at 20 West Gaston 
Street 



Evening College 

This part of our program is designed to serve the needs of those 
in the community who wish to continue their formal education by taking 
courses in the late afternoon and evening. Many of these earn full 
college credit which may be applied toward graduation at Armstrong or 
which may be transferred to other institutions for credit. Special 
courses are also offered which may or may not carry college credit 
hut which will meet special needs and cultural interests of individuals 
and groups in the community. A special evening college bulletin will he 
sent on request. 



Audio-Visual Instri ction 

Many of the classrooms of the college are equipped with screens 
for the showing of films, which are used extensively by all of the 
departments. In the teaching of English, foreign languages and music, 
visual aids are supplemented by recordings. 



14 ARMSTRONG COLLEGE 

Homecoming \m> Open Hoi se 

Twice each war the college in\ ites the public to visit the campus. 

The week before Christmas Holidays, Homecoming i> celebrated for all 

alumni and students with a parade, a reception, an intercollegiate 
basketball game, and the Christmas dance. All alumni, students and 
their friends are invited to attend. 

During the Spring, the college is open to the general public for 
inspection during its annual Open House. Exhibits are prepared by 
the various departments interpreting the work done in the junior college. 
Those desiring may make tours of the college buildings and attend a 
social hour in the Home Economics Department. 



Student Assistants and Associates 

The college employs each year a number of student associates and 
assistants to work with the faculty. These students find employmenl 
in the library, science laboratories, business office, and with the facultv. 
Students desiring one of these jobs should apply to the instructor in 
the department in which he is interested or to the President. 



Scholarships and Loans 

There are a number of scholarships and loans available for stu- 
dents. Application blanks may be secured by a request addressed to 
the President of Armstrong College. Applications for scholarships and 
loans for the school year beginning in September must be on file in 
the President's office by July 15. Applicants will be notified when 
personal interviews are scheduled. 



Placement Service 

The college maintains a placement service for the benefit of em- 
ployers and students. Anyone seeking part-time employment while in 
college, or full-time employment after leaving college, should place his 
name on file with the Business Office. 



Commencement Exercises 

Commencement exercises are held once each year in June. At this 
time the degree of Associate in Arts is awarded to those studnts who 
have met the requirements for graduation. At this time recognition 
i> given to those students who qualif\ for scholastic honors. The 
Facult\ and Graduates participate in full academic dress. 



u:\rn\i. in formation 15 

STUDEN1 Cl NTER 

The college does not operate dormitories. The Student Center in 
the 1 1 niit Building is « »| >*-ii throughout the college day, affording recrea- 
tion between classes. \ snack bar serves cold snacks. \ I k Btore 

i> also operated for the students convenience. 

STl im \t \( n\ [TIES 

The entire program of extra-curricular activities at the college is 
designed to help develop the whole individual and to assist him in 
becoming an active member of the community. The program comes 
direetK under the Dean of Students who is assisted b\ the Student 
Senate, composed of representatives from each recognized club or 
group. Each student is urged to participate in those activities which 
appeal to his interest or meet his needs. 

Athletics 

The college engage- in inter-collegiate basketball. All other sports 
at the college are operated on an intramural basis. Armstrong College 
was the champion of the Georgia Junior College League in 1948, semi- 
finalist in L949, finalist in 1950. and semi-finalist in 1951. 



Intramural Sports 

Intramural teams are organized into a men's league and a women- 
league for competition in certain major sports. At the end of the school 
year the champion in each league is awarded a trophy. 

Social Clubs 

The college recognizes certain groups which are organized to foster 
social life among the students at the college. 

Pre-Professional Clubs 

Some clubs are organized to acquaint students with the ideals and 
objectives of certain professional groups, as in the engineering and 
the science clubs. 

Class Clubs 

These clubs are designed to encourage students to pursue their 
various intellectual interests beyond the instructional activities of the 
classroom, as the French club, the mathematics club, and others. 



16 ARMSTRONG COLLEGE 

Pi BLH \ l IONS 

The college publishes the Inkwell, a newspaper; the Mercury, a 
magazine; and the 'Geechee, a year book. These afford students an 
opportunity to express their (.pinion- on a wide varietj <»f topics, to 
do creative writing and gain practice in other journalistic activities. 

Ki:< re \ ! k»\ Cli bs 

Armstrong is a community college. To fulfill tin- mission, the 
college extends its activities beyond the student body, inviting all in- 
terested citizen- of the communit) to participate in different recrea- 
tional groups. Outstanding among these is the Film Forum. Great 
Books Seminar, the Music Club and other cultural group-. Members 
of the community, though not registered at the college, who are in- 
terested in an) of these cultural activities are invited to participate. 

Tm Armstrong Colleck Masqi ers 

The Armstrong College Masquers, with a charter membership of 
over seventj students, was organized in the Fall of 1950. after the 
Savannah Playhouse separated from Armstrong College and became a 
distinct community theatre. 

Masquer membership is open to all students interested in an\ 
phase of the theatre: acting, designing, lighting, make-up. costuming 
and other production skill- Vt the annual spring festival, all Masquer 
members are recognized and those serving with distinction during 
their membership are awarded special pins. 

In its first \ear of existence, the organization achieved local 
popularity with its three major productions: a bill of three one- 
act pla\s. Gilbert and Sullivan's The Mikado, and Elmer Rice's Two 
On An Island. The Masquers also embarked on an ambitious pro- 
gram of one-acts for the college assemblies, radio dramatizations, and 
appearances before local civic clubs. 

Glee Club 

The Armstrong (dee Club was reorganized in September, 1949. Its 
member- are drawn from the student bod) and faculty. Besides giving 
two complete concerts at the college, one at Christinas and one in the 
Spring, the group has sung for main civic club- in Savannah. 

In \pril. L950, the Glee Club made a trip to Macon, Georgia, to 
appear before the District Rotar) Convention. 

Rehearsals of one-hour duration are held three times a week. 
Membership is open to all interested students. 



General Regulations 

Coi NSELING 

To help a student "find himself' and selecl a definite objective 
earl} in In- college program, the Armstrong -tall administers to each 
entering freshman a series of interest, aptitude, and achievemenl tests. 
In the Fall, these are given during Freshman Week and arc scored prior 
to the student's interview with a counselor. On the basis of these ob- 
jective measurements, the student's previous record, Ins interesl and 
his famih counsel, the student with the aid of his advisor decide- on 
a program of stud) which will enable him to accomplish his purpose. 

Physical E\ wiin itiqns 

All regular students are required to enroll for courses in physical 
education. Each student must submit a completed physical examina- 
tion report on the forms furnished 1>\ the college before he can com- 
plete his registration. On the basis of the examinations, the physical 
education department will adapt a program of training suited to indi- 
vidual requirements. 

Course Load 

The unit of work for a regular student is 12-18 quarter hours per 
quarter. A nominal schedule of sixteen quarter hours presupposes that 
the average student will devote approximately forty-eight hours per 
week to his college classes and to his preparation therefor. 

Permission to enroll for more than 18 quarter hours will be granted 
when curricular requirements make such action necessary, or when 
evidence as to the capacity of the student seems to justify that the 
privilege be granted. No student will be allowed to register for more 
than 21 hours in any one quarter. 

Should a student's work load fall below the normal schedule, the 
students parent or guardian (in case of veterans attending school under 
Public Law 16 and 346, the Veterans Administration) will be notified. 

Admission to Class 

Students will be admitted to class when the instructor is furnished 
an official class card indicating that he has completed his registration 
and paid his fees in the Business Office. 

Conduct 

Armstrong students are expected to conduct themselves as ladies 
and gentlemen. Compliance with the Commission and faculty regula- 
tions is assumed. The use on the campus of intoxicating beverages. 



18 ARMSTRONG COLLEGE 

gambling, and hazing arc prohibited. The faculty approved the recom- 
mendation of t h<* Student Senate for consideration and handling of 
honor infractions in class work. This provision and other instructions 
contained in the Armstrong Handbook are official regulations. 

Reports and Grades 

It is felt by Armstrong that students in college should be held ac- 
countable for their own scholarship. Accordingly, report cards, warn- 
ings of deficient scholarship and other such notices are not sent out to 
parents or guardians by the college except by request. Instead the 
students themselves receive these reports and are expected to contact 
the counseling staff whenever their work is unsatisfactory. Report 
cards are issued at the end of each quarter. Reports of failing grades 
are issued in the middle of each quarter. Each student has access to 
a counselor, made up of the faculty members for purposes of advise- 
ment; and in addition, the Registrar, Dean of Students, and all instruc- 
tors are available to help and advise any student seeking assistance. 

Reports are based on the following system of grading: 

4 honor points per quarter hour 
3 honor points per quarter hour 
2 honor points per quarter hour 
1 honor point per quarter hour 
No honor points per quarter hour 

Conditions must be removed before 

mid-term of the following quarter 
Course must be repeated 
Course must be repeated 
Course must be repeated 

An "E" I conditional failure) may be removed by means stipulated 
by the instructor of the course in which the student received the grade 
"E." An "E" not removed by the mid-term of the succeeding quarter 
automatically becomes an "F." If a course in which an "E" grade was 
received is repeated, an "F" will be entered on the student's permanent 
record card for the first time the course was taken. 

Honors 

Students who have been in attendance for three consecutive quar- 
ters taking a normal load and achieved an average of "B" or better 
with no grade below that of "C" will be placed on a Permanent Dean's 
List in a book for that purpose kept in the office of the President. This 
list is published each June in the commencement program. 

Graduates who meet the requirements for the Permanent Dean - 
List and who are graduating with an average of three honor points 



A plus 


Exceptional 


A 


Excellent 


B 


Good 


C 


Fair 


D 


Poor 


E 


Conditional 




Failure 


F 


Failure 


W 


Withdrew 


W-F 


Withdrew Failin 



GENERAL REGULATIONS _19 

per quarter hour, will be designated as graduating Bumma cum laude 
(with highest distinction). The designation cum laude (with distinc* 
tion) will be bestowed upon those meeting the above requirements with 
an average of two honor points per quarter hour. 

\ valedictorian will be selected 1>\ the graduating class from among 
the five students with the highesl scholastic averages in the work com 
pleted before the term in which the students graduate. 

Students who make a grade <>f "B" or better in each course during 
an) quarter will be placed on the Dean's Scholastic Vttainmenl List 



Attendance 

Students are expected to attend classes as scheduled. Any absence, 
whatsoever, from class work entails a loss to the student. 

A student who has been absent from class for a valid reason should 
have the absence excused. The student will submit a written excuse 
to the instructor who will initial the excuse. The student will then turn 
the form in to the Registrar's office. Excuses must be submitted within 
seven days from the date the student returns to school: otherwise the 
absence will not be excused. 

A student who has unexcused absences equal in number to the 
time the class meets in one week, and has one additional unexcused 
absence, will be dropped from class. The instructors will notify the 
Registrar's office when a student should be dropped from class. The 
Registrar's office will notify the student. The grade given a student who 
has been dropped will be either W or W-F, depending on the status of 
the student at the time he is dropped from class. 

Students are required to attend the college's bi-weekly assemblies. 
Official announcements are made at these meetings. 



Withdrawals 

A formal withdrawal, presented to the President in writing, is a 
prerequisite for honorable dismissal from, or re-entrance into, this in- 
stitution. Any student planning to withdraw should immediately make 
such intentions known to the administration of the school in writing. 
This notice is required to receive any authorized refunds. 

In order that a student may not receive a failing grade on his per- 
manent record in the Registrar's office, he should make formal with- 
drawal from any class which he stops attending. The instructor's 
approval should be brought to the Registrar's office in writing. 



20 ARMSTRONG COLLEGE 

Students will receive a prejudicial grade in a five-hour course 
dropped after the second week <>r in a three-hour course dropped after 
the third week of a quarter unless there are extentuating circumstances 
approved l»\ the instructor. 



( -i; \im vri()\ 

In order to graduate, a student must complete with a "C" average 
one of the programs of stud) consisting of approximately inn hours 

which are listed under "Curricula." A student must complete one-third 
of the work toward graduation at Armstrong. A student ma\ present 
in correspondence courses as much as one-fourth of the total work re- 
quired for graduation. The college will accept USAFI courses. 

To be considered as a candidate for graduation, a student should 
make application in the Registrars office at least two quarters prior to 
the expected date of graduation. 



Recommendations 

The recommendations issued by the college are written in terms 
of the grades the student earns, and what his teachers think of him as 
expressed by them on a student rating form. These reports are part 
of his permanent record. 

The records of the Registrars office are counsulted regularly by 
representatives of the Federal Bureau of Investigation, the Civil Service, 
the local Credit Bureau and other agencies having access to confidential 
records. These records are of vital importance to the student. 



Curricula 



Gener m. 

Before registration, the student Bhould PLAN \ PROGRAM OF 
ST1 Dl \\ I Til \ COl NSELOR. Even if a student knows what studies 

are required of him to gradaute, he should have on record in the Dean 
of Students 1 office a cop) <>f his program. 

The \sscoiate of \ii- degree is conferred upon all students who 
complete at Armstrong College one <»f the programs of stud) outlined 
in the catalog. It i- expected some -indents will want to change their 
objectives. The college desiro t<> belp them "find themselves." 

Before registering and after a full discussion and consideration of 
bis interests and qualifications with parents and friends who can help 
him. and after interviews with members of the faculty or a counselor, 
the -Indent should decide what he is going to study. The student will 
then work out a tentative list of the subjects to be taken during each 
of the quarters he plans to be at Armstrong. This list will be kept for 
future reference so that he ma\ build his program each quarter with 
a definite goal in mind. 

If the student changes his objective and wishes to change his pro- 
gram of study, he will report this fact to his counselor. 

If completion of his training involves going to another school after 
he leaves Armstrong, the following steps are urgent: 

Secure the college's catalog and see what courses must be 
completed at Armstrong College to meet the degree require- 
ments at the senior college; 

Schedule the prerequisites for the courses to be taken later; 
make a list of the subjects to be taken at Armstrong College for 
each of the quarters before transferring, and be sure it in- 
cludes all of the courses required for the junior class standing, 
if possible. 



The Core Curriculum 

There are certain bodies of knowledge and certain skills indispen- 
sable to every college trained man and woman. The understanding of 
one's environment and man's struggle to adapt it to useful ends, the 
ability to communicate his thoughts and feelings; right group-attitudes 
and coordinated physical activity — these objectives are set up in the 
following courses required of all students desiring to graduate from 
the college. An equivalent course taken at another institution is ac- 
ceptable. 



22 ARMSTRONG COLLEGE 

Freshman year: English L 1-12-13; Historj 11-12-13: ten quarter 
hours of a laborator) science, and Physical Education Ll-12-13. 

Sophomore year: English 21-22-23 and three quarters <>f physical 
education. Students enrolled in certain terminal courses described 
l.rlnw ma\ substitute English 20 and English 28 for English 21-22-23. 

Students graduating in less than the six quarters of the regular 
session may reduce their physical education requirements accordingly . 
Physical education should be taken in the proper sequence and tu<> 
courses should not be scheduled in any one quarter. 



Course Numbers 

Subjects listed from 10 through 19 indicate work that is usualK 
taken in the freshman year; and from 20 through 30, subjects recom- 
mended for study in the sophomore year. 



Associate In Arts 

CONCENTRATION-COMMERCE and 

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION SENIOR COLLEGE PREPARATORY* 

Many students will wish to continue their business studies in a 
senior college. These students should enroll for the following program: 

First Year Second Year 

Core Curriculum 31 Core Curriculum 12 

Commerce lla-b-Typing 4 Commerce 24-25-Accounting 10 

Mathematics 11-12-Basic Mathe- Economics 22-24-1 ntroductory and 

matics 6 Applied 10 

Electives 9 Political Science 13-American 

Government 5 

Electives 13 

Total Hours 50 Total Hours 50 

* A student should consult the catalog of his prospective senior college for re- 
quired subjects. Colleges differ a> to what subjects arc required for this course. 

CONCENTRATION-BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION TERMINAL 

Many students will not continue their formal education after leav- 
ing Armstrong. To these students the college gives the opportunity to 
select those subjects which have a vocational value. Sufficient general 
education is included in the core curriculum to make this a well-rounded 
program. 



( I IJKICl LA 



23 



FlRSI \ I Mi Si I OND \ i \i: 

Core I in i Milium 3] Commerce Ll-a-b-Typing \ 
Economics 21-24-Introducton and * Commerce L2-a*b-c>Shorthand 

Viiplicd 10 or < lommerce 24-25 26 \« 

Electives l J counting L5 

"English 20-Composition ."> 

Commerce 27-28-Business Law 10 

•♦English 28-Public Speaking 

Physical Education '.*> 

Electivea 8 

Total Hours 50 Total Hours 50 

*lf Shorthand i- desired, one quarter of ^counting is to be substituted for 
Economics the fir>i year. 

** English 21-22-2H ma> be taken in lieu of these English courses. 



( u\ckntratio\-<:hemistry 



SENIOR COLLEGE PREPARATORY 



The student who wishes to concentrate in one field of study mas 
take a program similar to the one described below for a major in 
chemistry. The junior college seeks to give a broad general education 
rather than to specialize in one particular field. For that reason it is 
advisable for the student to check the senior college catalog for which 
he is preparing and take only those courses which are transferable for 
credit. 



First Year 

Core Curriculum 21 

Chemistry 14-15-General 12 

Chemistry 24-Qualitative Analysis 6 
Mathematics 16-17-18-College Al- 
gebra, Trigonometry, Analytic 
Geometry 15 



Second Year 

Core Curriculum 12 

Chemistry 25-26-Quantitative 

Analysis 12 

French 10 

Mathematics 21-22-Differential 

and Integral Calculus 10 

Electives 5 



Total Hours 54 



Totals Hours 49 



CONCENTRATION-COMMERCE SECRETARIAL TERMINAL 

This program is designed to meet the needs of those students who 
wish to qualify for clerical positions in business. 

First Year Second Year 

Core Curriculum 31 Commerce 24-Accounting 5 

Commerce lla-b-c-Typing 6 * English 20-Composition 5 

Commerce 12a-b-c-Shorthand ... 15 Commerce 17-Office Practice . . 5 

Commerce 21a-b-c-Typing 6 

Commerce 22a-b-c-Shorthand .15 

* English 28 5 

Physical Education 3 

Electives 6 

Total Hours 52 Total Hours 50 

•English 21-22-23 may be substituted for these English courses. 



24 



ARMSTRONG COLLEGE 



I ON( in I i; \ I ION-HOME E( umimii S 



SENIOR COLLEGE PREPXRATORY 



The vocational opportunities in this field are numerous. Prepara- 
tion for marriage and personality development are other objectives of 
the home making courses 



FlRSl \ I \i: 

Cor< I lurriculum 21 

Home Economics LO-Orientaticn 3 
Home Economics 1 1-< llothing 5 
Home Economics 12-Foods . . 5 
Mathematics 1 L-Basic Mathema- 
tics 3 

Art 1 1-( Ireative 5 

Chemistry 11-12-Introductory 10 



Sb ond ^ EAB 

( lurriculum 12 

Psychology 21-Introducton 5 

Biology 10 
Home Economics 21-Home 

Furnishing 5 

Home Economics Elective.. 5 

Sociology L'l -Marriage and the 

Family 5 

Elective . . 5 



Total Hours 52 



Total Hours 



17 



( <>\< l.\TI!\TION-HOME ECO\(i\||i S 



TERM I. \ \|. 



This course is designed to meet the needs of those women who plan 
to complete their college work at \rmstrong. Sufficient electives are 
allowed to enable the student to select commerce subjects which have 
a vocational value or cultural subjects for worthy use of leisure time. 



First Year 

Core I lurriculum 31 

Home Economics 11-Clothing . 5 

Home Economics 12-Foods 5 

Psychology 21-Introductory ... 5 

Elective 5 



Second \ e lb 

(.'ore Curriculum 12 

Home Economics 21-Home 

Furnishing 5 

Home Economics 22-Nutrition . 5 
Sociology 21-Marriage and the 

Family 5 

Electives 22 



Total Hours 51 



Totals Hours 



19 



( oMENTRA'ITON-LIBERAL ARTS 



SENIOR COLLEGE PREPARATORY 



This program is recommended for candidates for an A.B. degree, 
pre-education. pre-law, pre-ministerial, journalism, and other pre-pro- 
fessional concentration-. 



First Year 

Core ( lurriculum 31 

Foreign Language 10 

Mathematics 11-12- 13-Basic 
Mathematics or Mathematics 
L6-17-College Ugebra and Tri- 
gonamentn *■) 



Total Hours 



50 



M COND \ E \K 

( lore ( lurriculum 12 

Two of the following courses: 10 

History 25-Recent European 

Political Science l.v American 

< rovernment 

Psy i hologj 21-Introductory 
•Science 10 

Electives 18 

Total Hours 50 






*A Btudent applying for admission to a senior college which <lo.-- not require the 
amount indicated oi this subject may, with tin' approval of \\\> counselor, >ul»-ti- 



( I RRIC1 LA 



25 



tute othei courses required l»\ the senior institution. Students m»t planning to 
majoi hi mathematics 01 physica] sciences Bhould postpone mathematics until 
the sophomore year and complete 15 hours <»i t< > i »i <in language a n< I 5 hours oi 



in elective in the freshma 



yeai , 



( o\( I NIK VTION-LIBER \l. \KT> 



I I i;\ll\ \l. 



To the Students who will tlOl Continue their formal education after 

leaving Armstrong, this program gives tin' opportunity to -elect those 

subjects which are liberal in nature. ej\ ing one a better understanding 
of himself and his environment. Sufficient electives are allowed to 
enable the -Indent to explore that field of knowledge in which he is 
particular!) interested. 



First "i km; 

< ore Curriculum '>l 

Mathematics 11-12-Basic Mathe- 
matics 6 

Electives 13 



Se< ond \ \ \u 



12 



Core Curriculum 

Psychology 21-Introductory 5 

Sociology 21 -Marriage ami Family 5 

Electives 28 



Total Hours 



50 



Total Hours 



50 



CONCENTRATION-PHYSICAL EDUCATION SENIOR COLLEGE PREPARATORY 

The Physical Education Department is qualified to provide the 
first two years of preparation for a major in the field of health and 
physical education for those students planning to enter the field of 
education or supervised recreation. 



First Year 

Core Curriculum 21 

Mathematics 11-12-13-Basic Math- 
ematics or Mathematics 16-17- 
College Mgehra and Trigo- 
nometry 9 

Physics or Chemistry 10 

Electives 10 



Second Year 

( lore Curriculum 10 

\natomy in In, 2n, 3n 9 

Home Economics 22-Nutrition . . 5 

'Physical Education 23-24 4 

Psychology 21-Introductory .. . 5 

Phycholog) 23-Child 5 

Sociology 21-Marriage and 

Family 5 

Electives 8 



Total Hours 50 Total Hours 51 

* Women will take Physical Education 29 and one other Physical Education course. 



CONCENTRATION-PRE-DENTAL 



SENIOR COLLEGE PREPARATORY 



All courses for pre-professional degrees should conform to senior 
college requirements. 



26 



MiMSTKOV; COLLEGE 



First V bar 
Core Curriculum 12 
( Ihemisti j 1 L-15-General 12 
Mathematics 11-12-13-Basic Math- 
ematics or Mathematics 16-17- 
( lollege Ugebra and Trigo- 
nometry 9 

Total Hours 52 



Si ' OND ^ EAR 

Core Curriculum 12 

French 10 

Physics ll-12-Survey ... 12 

Elective* IS 

Total* Hours 19 



CONCENTRATION-PRE-MEDICAL 



SENIOR COLLEGE I'REI' \R \T()R^ 



All courses for pre-professional degrees should confront to senior 
college requirements. 



First Year 

(lore Curriculum 12 

Biology 11-12-General Zoology . . 12 

Chemistry 14-15-General 12 

Chemistry 24-Qualitative Analysis 6 

Mathematics 16-College Algebra 5 

Mathematics 17-Trigonometry . . . 5 



Second ^ EAR 

Core Curriculum 21 

Biology 23-Vertebrate Anatomy.. 6 
Chemistry 25-Qualitative Analysis 6 

French 10 

Physics 11-12-Survey 12 



Total Hours 52 



Total Hours 55 



One Year Programs 

concentration-engineering senior college preparatory 

This program will satisfy degree requirements for the first year o' 
mcst types of engineering but should be varied for certain degrees such 
as chemical, electrical, etc. The student should obtain a catalog from 
the senior college he plans to attend and check this program against the 
requirements. The courses required for the freshman year have been 
worked out in consultation with the Georgia Institute of Technology. 

( Ihemistry 14-15-General 12 

English 11-12-13-Freshman 9 

Engineering 11-12-13-Drawing l > 

Engineering 26-Plane Surveying 2 

History 11-12-13-Western Civilization (or Modern Language) 9 

Mathematics 16-17-18-College Ugebra, Trigonomentry and Analytic Geometry 15 

Physical Education 11-12-13 3 



Total Hour* 



59 



CI RRICl l\ 27 



( o\< I \ rRATION-STENOCR M'liK 

\ Btudenl who has onl) one year to spend in college ma) herein 

master some of the tools that will enable him to earn a livelihood. 

( lommerce 1 la-b-c-Tj ping 6 

Commerce l2a-b-c-Shorthand 15 

Commerce 17-Office Practice 5 

( lommerce 2 1 Accounting 5 

English 2()-( Composition 5 

English 28-Public Speaking 5 

Physical Education 11-12-13 3 

Elective* 5 

Total Hours 49 

CONCENTRATION-NURSING 

Armstrong College offers the following courses in co-operation with 
the Warren A. Candler School of Nursing. With the permission of 
the instructor and the approval of the student's counselor, a student not 
enrolled in the School of Nursing may take any of the following courses. 

Anatomy In, 2n, 3n 9 

Chemistry In 5 

Sociology In 5 

Physical Education 11-2 2 

Bacteriology In, 2n • 6 

Nutrition In 4 

Psychology In 5 

Total Hours 36 



Course Descriptions 

General 
Armstrong College reserves tin- right to ill withdraw an) course 

for which less than ten students register. (2l limit the enrollment in 
an\ course or class section, (3) fix the time of meeting of all classes 
and sections, and ill oiler such additional courses as demand arid staff 
personnel warrant. 

No credit will be given in beginning courses in commerce and 
languages where the same or similar courses have been presented for 
admission from high school. 

Where two or more courses are listed under one description, no 
credit for graduation will be given until the sequence is completed. 

After each course, the first number listed is the number of hours 
of lecture: the second, the number of hours of laboratory and the 
third, the number of quarter-hour credit the course carries: e-g. (3-3-4) 
means 3 hours of class. 3 hours of laboratory. 4 quarter hours of credit. 

ARTS 
(See Fine Arts) 

BIOLOGY 

"Anatomy and Physiology ln-2n-3n (2-2-31. Fall. Winter and 
Spring. Laboratory fee. $2.50. 

A three quarter course in human anatomy and physiology. The 
gross anatomy, some histology and physiology of the organ systems are 
presented in order to give the student an understanding of the human 
bod) as a basis for further studies in clinical nursing. The labora- 
tory work includes some dissection of the lower vertebrates and ele- 
mentary experiments in physiology. 

Biology 14rA - General Zoology (3-4-5). Fall and Winter. Laborator\ 
fee. $3.50. 

Iliology 14-/2 - General Zoology (3-6-6). Fall and Winter. Falun a- 
tor\ fee. $3.50. 

Introduction to animal structures and function and a sur\e\ of 
the invertebrate phyla. Laboratory work on representative specie- of 
each phylum. 

Biology 15-A - General Zoology (3-4-5). Winter and Spring. Lab- 
orators fee. >.') 50. Prerequisite: Biology 14. 

Biology L5-fi - General Zoology (3-6-6). Winter and Spring. Lab- 
oratan fee. $3.50. Prerequisite: Biolog) 14. 



COURSE DESC miTH>\> 

Stud) of vertebrate structure and function, using selected vertebral 
materia] for laboratory dissection. Concludes with a stud) <»f the 
principles of Evolution and Genetics. 

Biology l()-17-li') - Human Biology (3-1-3 1 3). Fall, Wintei 
and Spring. Laboratory fee, $1.00. 

\ three quarter course for terminal >tudent> beginning with a 
survey of the basic biological principles and followed l>\ a stud) of 
the structure and function of the human body. Principles of Evolution 
and Genetics will be discussed in the lasl quarter. One hour a week 
laboratory on selected material. 

Biology 22 - Invertebrate Zoology (3-6-6). Spring. Laboratory 

fee. S5.00. Prerequisite: Biology 14 and 15. 

A concentrated study of the structure and function of invertebrates 

including their economic relation to man. Field trips included for nat- 
ural habitat study. 

Biology 23 - Comparative Vertebrate (3-6-6). Fall. Laboratory 
fee, $5.00. Prerequisite: Biology 14 and 15. 

A study of the anatomy and evolution of the organ systems of the 
vertebrates. Laboratory work on Squalus, Necturus and the cat. 

* Bacteriology \n-2n (2-2-3). Winter and Spring. Laborators 
fee, $2.50. 

An introduction to micro-organisms as living organisms and as 
pathogens. The structure, life history and public health importance of 
representative viruses, bacteria, molds, protozoa and helminthes are con- 
sidered. The laboratory work includes the techniques of culturing bac- 
teria and the study of the scientific basis of antiseptic and aseptic- 
procedures. 

"These courses are transferable to senior colleges toward a B. S. 
in Nursing. 



CHEMISTRY 

Chemistry In - (4-3-5). Laboratory fee. $2.50. 

The purpose of this course is to acquaint students with the prin- 
ciples of inorganic, organic and physiological chemistry with special 
applictions to nursing practice. 

Chemistry 11-12-13 - General Chemistry (3-2-4). Fall. Win- 
ter and Spring. Laboratory fee, $3.50. Prerequisite: 2 years high 
school and mathematics. 



30 ARMSTRONG COLLEGE 

Tin- is a course in general descriptive chemistry. This course will 
meet the freshman requirements in chemistr) of engineering, science. 
and pre-medical students, as well as art students. The fundamental laws 
of chemist]*) and some elements and their compounds are studied. 

This course is designed for students who have not had high school 
chemistr) . 

Chemistry 14-15 - General Chemistry (5-3-61. Fall and Winter. 
Laboratory fee. $3.50. Prerequisite: 2 \ear> of high school mathe- 
matics. 1 year high school chemistn. 

This is a course in general descriptive chemistr\. It will meet 
the freshman requirements in chemistry of engineering, science and 
pre-medical students. The fundamental laws of chemistry and some 
elements and their compounds are studied. 

Chemistry 24 - Qualitative Analysis (3-6-61. Spring. Laboratory 
fee. $5.00. Prerequisite: Chemistry 13 or Chemistry 15 and Mathe- 
matics 16. This course can be taken concurrently with Chemistrx 13. 

The lectures include a study of the theoretical and fundamental 
principles of the subject, as well as a thorough study of the reactions 
of the more important ions. The laboratory work includes the sys- 
tematic analysis for both anions and cations by a semi-micro scheme. 

Chemistry 25 - Quantitive Analysis (3-6-6). Winter. Laboraton 
fee. $5.00. Prerequisite: Chemistry 24. 

This is an elementary course in quantitative analysis. 

Chemistry 26 - Quantitative Analysis (2-8-61. Spring. Laboratory 
fee. $5.00. Prerequisite: Chemistry 25. 

This is a more advanced course in quantitative analysis with em- 
phasis on gravimetric and instrumental methods of analysis. 



COMMERCE 

Commerce Wa-b - Beginning Typing 1 0-5-2 1. Fall and Winter. 
Laboratory fee. $3.50. 

This course consists of introductory instruction in the technical 
features and care of the machine, position, fingering, proper technique 
and masterv of the keyboard. An average speed of 40 words a minute 
is attained at the end of the second course. 

Commerce Lie - Intermediate Typing (0-5-2). Spring. Laboratory 
fee. S3. 50. Prerequisite: Commerce lla-b or equivalent. 



col RSE DESCRIPTIONS 31 



\ typewriter course in which emphasis is placed on speed building 
and accuracy. Special typing problems Buch as business letters, minutes, 
notices, stencil cutting and carbon copies arc stressed. 

Commerce \2<i-l> - Beginning Shorthand (5-0-5). Fall and Winter. 

Complete tlie<»r\ of Gregg Shorthand in the manual. Additional 
reading and dictation given from the Speed Studies. 

Commerce 12c - Intermediate Shorthand (5-0-5). Spring. 

Dictation and transcription of new and studied material. Student 
is required to take dictation at the rate of eight) words a minute. 

Commerce I3fl - Burroughs Calculator and Comptometer (0-5-2). 
Fall. Laboratory fee. S3. 50. 

The objective of this course is to build speed and accuracy in the 
operation of the Burroughs Calculator and Comptometer and a thorough 
review of business mathematics. This quarter is devoted to the opera- 
tion of the four fundamentals in arithmetic of the calculator. 

Commerce 136 - Burroughs Calculator and Comptometer I 0-5-2 I. 
Winter. Laboratory fee. S3. 50. 

The following business mathematics are reviewed and applied on 
the machine during this quarter: decimal equivalents, split divisions, in- 
voicing over the fixed decimal, percentages, discounts, and chain dis- 
counts, costs, selling and rate of profit. 

Commerce 13c - Burroughs Calculator and Comptometer 1 0-5-2 1 . 
Spring. Laboratory fee. S3. 50. 

The third quarter is a continuation of business problems on the 
machine. The transactions covered are reciprocals figuring grain, 
cipher, division, prorating cost and expenses, gross and dozen in in- 
voicing inventories. 

Commerce 17 - Ojjice Practice (5-0-5). Spring. 

Typical business office situations are duplicated as nearly as pos- 
sible. Practical problems deal with dictation and transcription, typing, 
operation of the mimeograph, filing and office courtesy. 

Commerce 19 - Modern Business Mathematics i 3-0-3 > . Spring. 
Prerequisite: Mathematics 11-12 or its equivalent. 

This course gives that background necessary for dealing with prob- 
lems found in banking, real estate, financing, and accounting: the 
operation of the compound-interest law in business; simple problems 



32 AHM>TK ONG COLLEGE 

concerning bonds, sinking funds, valuation «>f properties, annuities, 
and insurance. Practical problems in these fields will be emphasized. 
The necessary aids and shortcuts with use of tables and logarithms will 
be studied. 

Commerce 21a - idvanced Tying (0-5-2). Fall. Laboratory fee, 
13.50. Prerequisite: Commerce Lie <>r equivalent 

Advanced typing i> a course in the acquisition of >peed and ac- 
curacy including various legal forms and papers, manuscripts and busi- 
ness papers. An average of 65 words a minute is attained. 

Commerce 2\b - A continuation of Commerce 21a (0-5-2). Winter. 
Laboratory fee, $3 '->' >. 

Commerce 21c - A continuation of Commerce 2lb (0-5-2). Spring. 
Laborator) fee. $3.50. 

Commerce 22a - Advanced Shorthand (5-0-5). Fall. Prerequisites: 
Commerce 12a. b, c 

\ course in which the principles of Gregg Shorthand are applied 
in developing skill and accuracy in writing shortland and in transcrib- 
ing. The first half year is devoted to dictation of general business 
material: the second half, to dictation material apph ing to 16 major 
vocations. A speed of 120 words a minute for 5 minutes is required. 

Commerce 22b - i continuation of Commerce 22a (5-0-5). \X inter. 

Commerce 22c - I continuation of Commerce 22b (5-0-5). Spring. 

Commerce 23a - Advanced Calculator and Comptometer (0-5-2'. 
Fall. Laboratory fee. $3.50. 

The next two quarters are devoted to the application of the machine 
and business mathematics t«> the follow ing businesses: drugs, hardware, 
electrical, plumbing, contracting, wholesale paper, pay roll, packing 
house, creameries and dairies, laundries, steel and iron, department 
stores, banks, lumber, petroleum, railroads. 

Commerce 23b - \ continuation of Commerce 23a (0-5-2). W inter. 
Laboratory fee. $3.50. 

Commerce 23c - Idvanced Calculator and Comptometer (0-5-2). 
Spring. Laborator) fee, $3.50. 

Speed, skill and accurae\ in the operation of the machine are 
stressed in this las! period. 

( ommerce 21 - Principles of Accounting, Introductory (5-0-5). 



C01 IM Ml S< RIPTIONS 



\n introduction t" the fundamental principles and procedures ol 
accounting, including a stud) of the journal, the ledger, accounting state- 
ments, controling accounts, special journals and the accounting Bystem. 

Commerce 25 - Principle* <>l iccounting, Introductory 1 5-0-5 1 . 
Winter. Prerequisite: Commerce 24. 

\n application of accounting principles to certain problems such 
as tin- proprietorship, the partnership, the corporation, departmental 
operations, manufacturing accounts and the analysis of accounting 
statements. 

Commerce 2(> - Principles of Iccounting, Intermediate (5-0-5). 
Spring. Prerequisite: Commerce 25. 

Basic accounting thcor\ with emphasis on the various form- of 
business organization, assets, liabilities and reserves. 

Commerce 27 - Business Law (5-0-5) . Winter. 

Contracts: offer and acceptance, consideration, performance, rights 
of third parties and discharge. Agency: creation of an agenc\ . powers, 
liabilities of principal and agent. Negotiable instruments: element- of 
negotiability endorsement, and transfer, liabilities of parties, discharge. 

Commerce 28 - Business Law (5-0-5). Spring. Prerequisite: Com- 
merce 27. 

Partnership: formation, powers, liabilities of partners, termination. 
Corporation: formation, powers, rights of securit) holders. t\pes of 
securities. Sales: vesting of title, warrants, remedies. 

ECONOMICS 

Economics 21 - Principles of Economics ( 5-0-5 I . Fall and Summer. 

A study of the principles behind the economic institutions of the 
present time and an examination of some of the economic problems 
in the modern world. 

Economics 24 - Problems of Economics 1 5-0-5 ) . Spring. Prere- 
quisite: Economics 21. 

A study of economic problems based upon the principles studied in 
Economics 21. 

ENGINEERING 

Engineering 11 - Engineering Droning (0-6-3). Fall. 

Topics of study include lettering, the use of the instruments, ortho- 
graphic projection, auxiliary views, section, pictorial representations. 



34 ARMSTRONG COLLEGE 

Engineering 12 - Engineering Drawing (0-6-3). Winter. Prere- 
quisite: Engineering 1 1. 

Topics of stud\ include sections, dimensions, limit dimensions, 
threads, and fastenings, shop processes, technical, sketching, working 
drawings, pencil tracing on paper, reproduction processes. 

Engineering 13 - Engineering Drawing (0-6-3). Spring. Prere- 
quisite: Engineering 12. 

Topics of study include technical sketching of piping and fittings, 
working drawings, ink tracing on cloth, working drawings from as- 
semblies and assemblies from working drawings. 

Engineering 26 - Plane Surveying (1-3-2). Spring. Prerequisite: 
Mathematics 17. 

Theory of practice in chaining, differential and profile leveling, 
traversing, topographic surveying, reduction and plotting of field notes 
and mapping. 

ENGLISH 

English 11 - Freshman English (3-0-3). Fall and Spring. 

This course covers a review of punctuation and the fundamentals of 
grammar, theme writing, and vocabulary building. Also the student 
reads and discusses selections from the work of several of the most 
prominent literary figures of the Western World. 

English 12 - Continuation of English 11 (3-0-3). Fall. Winter and 
Summer. 

English 13 - Continuation of English 12 (3-0-3.) Winter. Spring 
and Summer. 

In English 11-12-13 selections from the works of the following 
authors will be read: Homer, Sophocles. Chaucer. Montaigne. Cellini. 
Voltaire. Checkov, Hardy, as well as those of certain English Romantic 
poets. 

English 2.v - Freshman English (5-0-5). Fall. (Not offered 1951). 

This course is devoted to a review of grammar, punctuation, me- 
chanics and sentence structure. Also the student reads and discusses 
selections from the works of the most prominent literan figures of the 
Western World. 

English 2y - Continuation of English 2.x (5-0-5). Winter. I Not 
offered 1 1952). 



C01 RSE DESCRIPTIONS 



English 20 - Composition (5-0-5). Fall. 

\ general re\ iew of grammar, composition, and vocabulary. The 
student will have practice in the writing <>f themes, reports and business 
letters. Several books will be assigned f<>r reading and discussion. 

English 21 - Survey <>l // orld Literature (3-0-3). Fall and Spring 

This course is designed to give the student a knowledge <»f the prin- 
cipal works of certain major writer- The studenl reads in some detail 

several hundred pages Erom the works of selected author- whose thoughl 
or style has been of world-wide significance. The last third of the 
course deals with modern trends in literature and thought. At intervals, 
students are asked to write papers, and emphasis is constantly placed 
on the improvement of the student s al>ilit\ to express himself. 

English 22 - Continuation of English 21 (3-0-3). Fall. Winter and 
Summer. 

English 23 - Continuation of English 22 (3-0-3). Winter. Spring 
and Summer. 

In English 21-22-23 selections from the works of the following 
authors will be read: Shakespeare. Milton. Goethe. Keats, Whitman. 
Ibsen; also selections from the Bible. The last quarter will be devoted to 
a consideration of representative works of contemporary writers in Eng- 
land and America. 

English 24 - An Introduction to Poetry (3-0-3). 

A study of the various types and forms of poetry with special em- 
phasis on the works of the more recent British and American poets. 

English 25 - American Literature ( 5-0-5 I . 

A survey of American literature and culture. In this course the 
student reads somewhat fully from works of a comparatively small 
number of notable and representative American writers. This course 
is primarily devoted to reading and discussion, but each student is asked 
also to select one particular period or author for concentration, making 
reports and writing papers in that phase of the work. 

English 26 - Advanced Composition ( 5-0-5 ) . Winter. 

Advanced writing practices. The course is designed to equip the 
student to express his ideas in clear, well-organized and interesting 
prose. Various techniques of composition are considered, but the main 
portion of the course is devoted to the writing and re-writing of ex- 
position. 



36 A K MSTR ONG COLLEGE 

English 27 - Reading Modern Drama (5-0-5). Spring. 

Students will participate in class reading and discussion of selected 
dramas. The plays will not be acted. The course is expected to ini- 
prove the Btudent's diction and reading. 

English 2o - Public Speaking (5-0-5). Winter. 

Fundamental principles involved in group discussion and the prep- 
aration and deliver) of original speeches for formal and informal 
occasions. 



FINE ARTS 

Art 11 - Creative Art (2-6-5). Spring. 

Drawing, art principles and design with work in other media at the 
discretion of the instructor. Some application will be made to poster- 
making, lettering and everyday life needs. 

Art 12 - Creative Art (2-6-5). Spring. (Not offered in 1951-52). 

A continuation of Art 11 with individual projects and extended 
studv of art histor\ . 

Music 11 - Elementary Theory and Sight-Reading (5-0-5). Fall. 

A course designed to teach the student to read music at sight and 
to understand the fundamental principles of music theory. Melodic dic- 
tation, melody writing and an introduction to elementary harmonj are 
included. 

Music 12 - Advanced Theory and Harmony (5-0-5). Winter. 
Prerequisite: Music 11. 

A continuation of Music 11. with emphasis on harmony, harmonic 

dictation, four-part harmonic writing. 

Music 20 - Music Appreciation (5-0-5). Spring. 

A course designed to help the reader understand and enjo) great 
music. Several works will be analyzed in detail as to form and struc- 
ture. A text will be used for factual background, class time being 
concentrated on brief exposition of themes followed b\ listening to 
records. Music and composers from the Early Christian period up 
through the modern period will be studied. 



C01 RSE DESCRIPTIONS 



FOREIGN LANGl VGES 

I KIN* II 

French 11-12 - Elementary French (5-0-5). Fall and Winter. 

\ course for beginners. The spoken language is studied as well 
i\> grammar and reading. 

trench 21 - Intermediate French (5-0-5). Fall and Spring. Pre- 
requisite: Tw<> quarters of college French or two years of high school 
French. 

Ke\ie\\ grammar, oral practice, reading of selected texts. 

French 22 - Intermediate French, continued (5-0-5). Winter. Pre- 
requisite: Three quarters of college French or three years of high 
Bchool French. 

Further reading of texts, oral and composition practice. 

French 23 - French Literature of the Nineteenth Century (5-0-5). 
Prerequisite: French 22. 

A survey course. Reading of texts, written and oral reports on 
collateral reading. 

French 24 - French Classical Drama (5-0-5) Spring. Prerequisite: 
French 22 (Not offered in 1951-52). 

Selected plays of Corneille. Moliere and Racine. 

Spanish 

Spanish 11-12 - Elementary Spanish (5-0-5). Fall and Winter. 

These courses are for the purpose of providing the student with the 
elements of Spanish by reading, composition and speaking. 

Spanish 21 - Intermediate Spanish (5-0-51. Fall and Spring. 

Grammar review, composition and selected prose readings. 

Spanish 22 - Advanced Spanish l 5-0-5 I. Winter. 

The purpose of this course is to increase the student's facility in 
Spanish composition and conversation. 

Spanish 23 - Commercial Spanish (5-0-5). Spring. 

A study of business letters and forms used by the Spanish-speaking 
world, and drill on the vocabulary of trade, travel and communication. 



38 ARMSTRONG COLLEGE 

Spanish 2\ - Modern Prose Readings (5-0-5). Spring. 

I hi- course provides intensive reading of novels, plays and short 
stories of nineteenth and twentieth century Spanish and Latin American 
authors. 

Spanish 2.~> - Comprehensive Reading and Advanced (Conversation 
(5-0-5). Spring. 

This course is planned for the student who has had at least three 
quarters, and preferably four quarters of Spanish. Stress is placed on 
comprehensive reading and conversation based on a selected text. 



HISTORY 

History 11 - An Historical Introduction to Contemporary Civiliza- 
tion l 3-0-3 I. Fall and Spring. 

This course comprises a chronological survey of the main currents 
of political, social, religious and philosophical thought in Western Civili- 
zation from the period of the sixth century in Greece to the present time. 

History 12 - A continuation oj History 11 l 3-0-3 I . Fall. Winter 
and Summer. 

History 13 - A continuation of History 12 I 3-0-3 I . Winter. Spring 
and Summer. 

In addition to a chronological treatment of events studied in the 
above courses, the dynamics of \^ estern Civilization are studied in 
works of the following authors: Plato. Lucretius. St. Augustine. Dante. 
Machiavelli. Descartes. Locke. Swift. Rousseau. Adam Smith. Ricardo. 
Malthus. Bentham. Carlyle. Marx. Shaw and Hersey. 

History 11-12-13 are required of all students seeking an Associate 
degree from Armstrong College and are designed to be complementar\ 
with English 11-12-13. 

History HO.v - If estern Civilization (5-0-5). \^ inter. (Not offered 
L952). 

\ survey of the political and cultural histon of the Near Eastern 
and European civilization from the earliest times through Vi orld Y\ ar 
II. Special emphasis is given to the Commercial and Industrial Revolu- 
tion-, the rise of political democrac) in Europe and \merica. the ex- 
tension of European culture to Vsia and \frica. the conflicts of Euro- 
pean states, and the recent and contemporary developments in the world. 



col RSE DESCRIPTIONS 



Histon 11<>\ - Continuation of History LlOa (5-0*5). Spring. < Not 
offered L952). 

History 22 - /.<///// imerican (5-0-5). S}>riii*r. 

Tin- course surveys tin- colonial, revolutionary and recent develop- 
tnents in the countries of Hispanic America. 

History 25 - Recent European History (5-0-5). Spring. 

This course Is designed to provide an opportunity for detailed study 
of major national and international developments in European affairs 
from about L870 to the present time. Special emphasis is devoted to 
the fir>t World War and new developments in Europe following that 
war and the complex of world events which preceded the Second World 
War. 

History 26 - Recent America History (5-0-5). Fall and Winter. 

This course has as its purpose the examination of the most im- 
portant events and movements, political, social and cultural, in American 
life from about 1900 to the present time. 



HOME ECONOMICS 

Home Economics 10 - Orientation (3-0-3). Fall. 

An introduction to home economics that gives the student some idea 
of the vocational opportunities in this field so she will be able to take 
better advantage of her course of study in college. 

Home Economics 2n - Nutrition and Food Preparation (4-2-5). 
Laboratory fee. S4.00. 

The fundamental principles of nutrition and food preparations are 
considered. The nutrition requirements of children and of adults are 
compared. Special attention is given to the nutrition requirements of 
childhood and pregnancy. 

Home Economics 11 -Clothing (2-6-5). Fall and Spring. Labora- 
tory fee. $1.00. 

A study of clothing to suit the individual needs and the application 
of art principles to dress, together with problems in clothing construc- 
tion in laboratory periods will be pursued. 

Home Economics 12 - Foods (3-4-5). Fall and Spring. Labora- 
tory fee, $7.00. 



40 ARMSTRONG COLLEGE 

\n introduction to the basic food and famih meal service. Com- 
plete meals are prepared and served in cadi laboratory period. 

Home Ecoonmics 13 - Catering (2-6-5). Winter. Laboratory fee, 
$7.00. Prerequisite: Home Economics 12. or consent of instructor. 

\ more advanced approach t<» fond preparation and selection. 
Foods are purchased and prepared for special occasions, such as formal 
dinners, luncheons, receptions and teas. 

Home Economics 21 - Home Furnishing • U3-5). Fall. Labora- 
tor\ fee, $2.00. Prerequisite: \rt 11 or consent of the instructor. 

A stud\ of the home from the standpoint of family needs. Both the 
interior and exterior of the home are considered with reference to such 
topics as home lighting, wall treatments, floor coverings, and storage 
-pate Period styles of furniture from those of ancient times to the 
present are studied. 

Home Economics 22 - Nutrition (5-0-5). Spring. Prerequisite: 
Chemistry 11 or 12. or consent of the instructor. 

A consideration of the laws governing the food requirements of 
individuals for maintenance and growth of the body. The food nu- 
trients and their contributions to the daily dietary are studied. 

Home Economics 23 - Advanced Clothing i 2-6-5 i . Winter. Lab- 
oratory fee. S1.00. 

Lectures cover garment selection and wardrobe planning and an 
introduction to the study of textiles. Laboratory periods are devoted to 
developing more advanced techniques in clothing construction. 



JOURNALISM 

Journalism 11 - (1-2-2). Fall. 

Students gain theoretical and practical experience in working out 
editorial, mechanical and business problems dealing with a publication. 

Journalism 12 - / continuation of Journalism 11 (1-2-2). Winter. 

Journalism L3 - I continuation of Journalism 12 il-2-2i. Spring. 

MATHEMATICS 

Mathematics 11. 12 and 13 is B terminal sequence, giving informa- 
tion about the genesis and development of mathematics. 



C01 RSI M S< RIP1 IONS ll 



Mathematics II - Basic Mathematics (3-0-3). Fall and Spring. 

\n Introduction i<> inductive and deductive methods; Euclidean and 
non-Euclidean By stems; theory of arithmetic numbers, operations and 
measurements; and logarithms. 

Mathematics {2 • Basic Mathematics (3-0-3). Winter and Summer. 

Prerequisite: Mathematics 11. 

\ continuation of the course started in Mathematics 1 1 ; variation; 
interest and annuities; progressions of numbers; combinations and 

probability ; functional relationships: and the binominal theorem. 

Mathematics 13 - Basic Mathematics 1 3-0-3 ) . Spring and Fall. 
Prerequisite: Mathematics 12. 

\dvanced circular functions: equations; common curves; and sta- 
tistical concepts. 

Mathematics 16 - College Algebra (5-0-&). Fall and Spring. Prere- 
quisite: Two years of high school algebra and one of Plane Geometry. 
i Students with insufficient preparation may audit Mathematics 16). 

A course in advanced algebra planned for mathematics or science 
majors. The course consists of functions and graphs: logarithms: 
linear and quadratic equations: the binomial theorem; complex num- 
ber- and the elemental") theor) of equations. 

Mathematics 17 - Trigonometry (5-0-5). Fall and Winter. Prere- 
quisite: Mathematics 16. 

A course covering the solution of the right and general triangle: the 
general solution of trigonometric equations: trigonometric identities: 
polar coordinates and the use of the slide rule. 

Mathematics lo - Plane Analytic Geometry (5-0-5). Winter and 
Spring. Prerequisite: Mathematics 17. 

Analytic geometry of the point and the line: elementary conic sec- 
tions; polar coordinates; transcendental curves and transformation of 
coordinates. 

Mathematics 21 - Differential Calculus (5-0-5). fall. Prere- 
quisite: Mathematics 18. 

Theory of difTerentation. with application to tangents: maxima and 
minima: rates; curature: velocity and acceleration: approximations; 
and Newton's method. 



42 A RMSTRONG COLLEGE 

Mathematics 22 - Integral Calculus (5-0-5). Winter. Prerequisite: 
Mathematics 21. 

Formulas and methods <>f integration, single integration applied in 
ana- and lengths; volumes and surfaces of revolution; centroids and 

moments of inertia: pressure and work. 

Mathematics 23 - Differential and Integral Calculus I 5-0-5 I . Spring. 
Prerequisite: Mathematics 22. I Not offered in 1951-52). 

The law of the mean and indeterminate forms; series, with applica- 
tions; partial and total derivatives, with applications; essentials of solid 
analytic geometr) ; multiple integration, applied to areas, volumes, 
centroids and moments of inertia. 

Mathematics 99 - Remedial Algebra I 3-0-5 I . Spring. ( Not offered 

in 1052). 

Designed to furnish the student with an insufficient high school 
mathematics foundation with the background necessary for successful 
completion of College Algebra, this course includes theory of numbers, 
factoring, fractions, linear equations, exponents and radicals and 
quadratic equations. 

MUSIC 

(See Fine Arts) 



PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

Physical Education 11 - Conditioning Course (0-3-1). Fall. 

Consists of calisthenics: stunts and tumbling: lifts and carries: road 
work, dual combatives; and simple games. 

Physical Education 12 - Team Sports (0-3-1). Winter. 
Consists of basketball, soccer, speedball and volle\ball. 

Physical Education 13 - Elementary Swimming (0-3-1). Spring. 

Physical Education 20 - First Aid and Safety Education (4-0-3). 
Winter. 

The American Wed Cross standard course in first aid is followed 1>\ 
a broad consideration of the opportunities for safet\ teaching in the 
school program. 

Physical Education 21 - Elementary Tennis (0-3-1). Fall. 



i 



C01 RSE DESCRIPTIONS I I 



Physical Education ~~ ■ Elementary ll<>\ini: for \Aen (0-3-1). 
\\ inter. 

Physical Education 23 - Senioi Life Saving and Instructors Course 
in Swimming for Men (2-3-2). Spring. 

Physical Education -I - Boxing for Teachers (2-3-2). Winter. 
Physical Education 25 - Folk Rhythms (0-3-] I. Fall. 

Physical Education 20 - Modem Dance (0-3-1 I. Winter 
Physical Education 27 - Tap Dance for Beginners (0-3-1 I. Winter. 

Physical Education 28 - Adult Recreative Sports (0-3-1). Spring. 

Consists of passive, semi-active, and active games and sports which 
have carry-over value for later life. 

Physical Education 29 - Folk Rhythms for Teachers (2-3-2). Fall. 

This course consists of advanced training in folk dances and prac- 
tice teaching of those dances. 

Physical Education 30 - Archery (0-3-1). Spring. 

PHYSICS 

Physics 10 - Physics Survey (5-2-6). Fall. Laboratory fee, $2.50. 

Designed for those students who do not intend to major in science. 
Topics are selected from the major fields of physics, and are presented 
with sufficient intensity to show the logic and methods of physics. Lec- 
ture demonstration methods, discussion sessions and laboratory work. 
No prerequisite other than high school algebra. 

Physics 11 - General Physics (5-2-6). Winter. Laboratory fee 
$2.50. Prerequisite: a course in college mathemetics or consent of 
instructor. 

Lectures, demonstrations, recitations and laboratory work covering 
the fields of mechanics and heat. 

Physics 12 - General Physics (5-2-6). Spring. Laboratory fee 
$2.50. Prerequisite: Physics 11 or consent of instructor. 

Lectures, demonstrations, recitations and laboratory work covering 
the fields of electricity, sound and light. 



44 ARMSTRONG COLLEGE 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 

Political Science L2 - The Governments of Foreign /'oners | 5-0-5 i . 
Summer and \\ inter. 

\ stud) is made of the leading modern political theories, and 
attention is paid to the structure and power- of the major foreign gov- 
ernments. 

Political Science 13 - Government of the United States (5-0-5). 
I all and Winter. 

A stud) is made of the structure, theory, workings of the national 
government in the Lnited States and some of the major problem- of 
the state and local government. The course shows how developmental 
practice has arrived at our government as it stands todav. 



PSYCHOLOGY 

Psychology \n I 5-0-5 I . 

This course is an introduction to the study of human behavior with 
emphasis on the underlying principles of mental adjustments. The im- 
portance of the nurse's own personality is stressed. 

Psychology 21 - Introductory Psychology (5-0-5). Fall and Spring. 

In this course human behavior is analyzed into its elementary func- 
tions of learning, feeling, thinking, maturation, motives and conflicts. 
Facts and principles from scientific research in psychology are used 
for understanding these functions and for measuring individual differ- 
ences in ability, personality and development. Standardized experi- 
ments and the students own experiences are used to explore and apply 
the facts in this field. 

Psychology 22 - Social Psychology I 5-0-5 l . Winter. Prerequisite: 
Psychology 21. 

This course is an introduction to the psychology of groups. \n 
analysis is made of psychological and socio-cultural motivation of the 
individual Special attention is given to a study of group membership, 
leadership, inter-group tensions, development of attitudes and values, 
prejudice, propaganda and public opinion.. 

Psychology 23 - Child Psychology (5-0-5). Spring. Prerequisite: 
Psychology 21. 

This course oilers a stud) of the developmental factors operating 
in a child's experience which make for. or interfere with, effective 



col RSE DES( RIPTIONS I i 



expression <>f his capacities and adjustment t<> life situations. Sources 
arc drawn from experimental research and from findings <»f analytic 
psychology. Direct observation <>f children individually and in a nur« 

ser\ is used as a source for class discission. 

Psychology 25 - Psychology of tdjustmerU (5-0-5). Winter. 

In this course emphasis is placed on the problems <»f the college 
student, drawn from systematic studies and from self-analysis. I 
studies, direct experience and psycho-dramas are used for class discus- 



PUBLIC SPEAKING 
(See English 28) 

SOCIOLOGY 

Sociology 2n (5-0-5). 

This course considers (1) the principles of sociology: I 2 I the nurse 
as a citizen of the community and as a professional worker: (3) the 
importance of the hospital among the social agencies in the community; 
i 4 i the patient in the hospital coming from the family and returning 
to the family. 

Sociology 20 - Introductory Sociology I 5-0-5 ) . Fall. 

A study of the principles of social organizations in American cul- 
ture based on scientific studies of groups, "races." population and of the 
institutionalized functions of society. 

Sociology 21 - Marriage and the Family (5-0-5). Winter and 
Spring. 

A study of family backgrounds, preparation for marriage, mar- 
riage interaction and family administration, family economics, problems 
of parenthood, family disorganization. A study of the family in the 
post-war period and present trends in family life are included. 

SPANISH 
(See Foreign Languages I 



INDEX 

A-Book 18 

Admission to < lass 17 

Admission t<> College 8 

Administration 3 

Advanced Standing 9 

Aims 8 

\i i. ( lourse I description 36 

Assemblies 19 

Asso< iate in Arts 21-22 

Athletics 15 

Vttriidance 19 

Audio-Visual Instruction 13 

Biology. Course Description 28 

Calendar 1951-1952 . . 2 

Certificate, Admission by 9 

Chemistry, Course Description 29 

Chemistry. Concentration in 23 

Clubs 15 

College Commission 3 

Commencement Exercises 14 

Commerce. Course Descriptions 30 

Commerce. Busines- Administration, Concentration in 22 

Commerce. Secretarial. Concentration in 23 

Core Curriculum 21 

Counseling 11-21 

Course Load 17 

Course Descriptions 29-45 

Dean's List 18 

Degrees. Programs of Study for 22-27 

Dormitories 15 

Economics. Course Descriptions 33 

Employment 14 

Engineering, Course Descriptions 33 

Engineering, Freshman 26 

English, Course Descriptions 34 

Evening I College 13 

Examination. Admission bj 9 

Faculty 3 



n n i : \ i . 



Page 

Feet l<» 

Fine ^rts, ( ourse I tesci i pt ion- 3(> 

Foreign Languages, Course Descriptions 37 

French, Course Descriptions 37 

Glee Club 16 

Grades 18 

Graduation, Requirements for 20 

History of College 7 

History, Course Descriptions 38 

Holidays 2 

\ [omecoming I 1 

Home Economic-. Course Descriptions 3 ( J 

Home Economics, Concentration in 24 

Honors 18 

[ndex 46 

Intramural Sports 15 

Journalism. Course Descriptions 40 

Liberal Arts, Concentration in 24-25 

Library 12 

Loans 14 

Masquers 16 

Mathematics, Course Descriptions 40 

Mental Health Clinic 12 

Music, Course Descriptions 36 

Night School (See Evening College) 13 

Nurses, Program 27 

Open House 14 

Organization of College 6 

Physical Education, Course Descriptions 42 

Physical Education, Concentration in 25 

Physical Examination 17 

Physics, Course Descriptions 43 

Placement Service 14 

Political Science, Course Descriptions 44 

Pre-Dental, Concentration in 25 

Pre-Medical, Concentration in 26 

Psychology, Course Descriptions 44 

Publications 16 



i;: 



VRMSTRONG COLLEGE 



Public Speaking, Course Dew iptions (Sec English 28i 36 

Recommendations 20 

Refunds 11 

Reports 18 

Requirements for Vdmission 9 

Scholarships 1 1 

Secretarial Training 27 

Sociology, Course Descriptions 45 

Spanish, Course Descriptions 37 

Special Students, Admission of 10 

Stenographic Training 27 

Student Activities 15 

Student Assi>tant> and \--o<iatr- 11 

Student Center 15 

Student Conduct 17 

Student Objectives 21 

Summer Session 2 

Testing Program for Freshmen 8 

Transfer Students 9 

Transfer to Other Institutions 21 

I SAF1 Credit 20 

Veterans. Admission of 10 

Veterans Guidance Center 13 

Withdrawal 19 



ARMSTRONG COLLEGE 

LIBRARY 



.'B'i'f! "-1 



IP 




110 

dim 



. e VU\ 



. 



1952 



1953 



For Reference 



Not to be taken from this room 




135 




rmstrony {J/o//eae 



SAVANNAH, GEORGIA 



1952 - 1953 



SLMMKR 



FALL 



WINTER 



SPRING 



Bulletin of 



Armstrong College 



of Savannah 



A Junior College Maintained 
by the City of Savannah, Georgia 



18817 




Membership In 

American Association of Junior Colleges 

Southern Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools 

Association of Georgia Colleges 

Georgia Association of Junior Colleges 



VOLUME XVII 



NUMBER 1 



ARMSTRONG COLLEGE 

LIBRARY 



CALENDAR FOR 1952- 1953 

SUMMER SESSION - EVENING COLLEGE ■ 1952 

FIRST TERM 

Registration June 16 

Classes begin June 17 

Lasl <la> to register for credit June 23 

Midterm reports due July 3 

Examinations July 23-24 

SECOND TERM 

Registration July 28 

Classes begin July 29 

Last day to register for credit August 4 

Mid-term reports due Vugusl 1 \ 

Examinations September 3- 1 

FALL QUARTER 

Freshman testing and Sophomore counseling September 22 

Freshman orientation September 23-26 

Registration September 26 

(Masses begin September 29 

Last day to register for credit October 10 

Mid-term reports due October 31 

Thanksgiving Holidays November 27-30 

Pre-registration December 3-5 

Examinations December 17-19 

Parade and Basketball game December 20 

Homecoming reception and dance December 22 

Christmas holidays December 22-Januarv 1 

WINTER QUARTER 

Registration January 2 

Classes begin January 5 

Last day to register for credit January 16 

Mid-term reports due February 6 

Pre-registration March 2-4 

Examinations March 13-16 

Spring holidays March 17-22 

SPRING QUARTER 

Registration March 23 

Classes begin March 24 

Last day to register for credit April 3 

Mid-term reports due April 24 

Pre-registration, Summer and Fall Quarters May 20-22 

Examinations June 1-3 

Sophomore Party June 5 

Sophomore-Alumni Luncheon June 6 

Graduation June 8 

SUMMER SESSION - EVENING COLLEGE - 1953 
FIRST TERM 

Registration June 15 

Classes begin June 16 

Last day to register for credit June 23 

Midterm reports due July 2 

Examinations Julv 22-23 

SECOND TERM 

Registration July 27 

( la begin July 28 

Last day to register for credit August 3 

Mid-term reports due August 13 

Examinations September 3-4 



Ad in i ii ist ra lion 

THE COLLEGE COMMISSION 

Herschel V. Jenkins Chairman 

William Murphey Vice-Chairman 

James Barnett, Ex-officio James I*. Houlihan, Ex-officio 

Morris Bernstein G. Phillip Morgan, Sr. 

Benjamin H. Levy, Ex-officio Mrs. William F. Robertson 
Olin F. Fulmer, Ex-officio Fred Wessels, Jr. 

Alfred T. Vick, Ex-officio 

ADMINISTRATIVE STAFF AND FACULTY 

Foreman H. Hawes A. B., M. S. President 

Arthur M. Gignilliat, A. B., M. A Director of the Evening College 

W. Orson Beecher, A. B., M. A. Dean of Students 

JosiE R. Nelson Secretary and Treasurer 

Wlliam Allgood, B. S., M. S., University of Alabama. 
Instructor in Biology and Chemistry 

Barbara Cowan Anchors, A. L. A., Armstrong College 

Acting Librarian 

W. Orson Beecher, A. B., M. A., Emory University; M. A. University 
of Georgia 

Instructor in History 

William L. Bell, B. S. in Education. Georgia Teachers College; Grad- 
uate study, George Peabody College for Teachers 
Basketball Coach and Instructor in Physical Education for Men 

# *Stephen P. Bond, Bachelor of Science and Architecture, Georgia 
Institute of Technology 

Instructor in Engineering 

Arthur W. Casper, B. S., Beloit College; M. S., University of Wisconsin 
Instructor in Mathematics 

** Part-time instructors 



ADMINISTRATION 



I.wiu; \Y. I > v\ is. I'. S.. 1 niversit) oi South Carolina; Graduate work, 
University of South Carolina 

Instructor in Business Administration 

Eleanor J. Doyle, B. S., Immaculata College; M. A., Catholic Univer- 
sity of America: Graduate Slu<l\. Tulane Universitx 
Instructor in Spanish and Director of Publications and Publicity 

**Harriet Allen Haines, Graduate of the Pape School. Draughon'fl 
Business College 

Instructor in Typewriting 

Uno Kask, B. S., University of Georgia; Graduate work at the Univer- 
sity of Washington. Seattle, Washington 

Instructor in Chemistry 

Joseph I. Killorin, A. B.. St. Johns College: M. A., Columbia Univer- 
sity 

Instructor in History 

Margaret Spencer Lubs, B. M., Converse College; A. B., University 
of Georgia; M. A., Columbia University 

Instructor in French and English 

Elmo M. McCray, Jr., B. S., and M. S., University of Alabama 
Instructor in Biology 

Dorothy Morris, B. S.. University of Tennessee 

Instructor in Physical Education for Women and 
Acting Director of The Physical Education Program 

Marjorie A. Mosley, Associate in Finance and Commerce, Armstrong 
College 

Secretary to the President 

Hinckley A. Murphy, B. A., Vanderbilt University; M. A., Columbia 
University 

Instructor in English 

Jack H. Padgett, A. B., Wofford College; M. A., University of North 
Carolina 

Instructor in Mathematics 

Jack Porter, A. B., George Peabody College for Teachers; M. A. 

University of North Carolina 
Instructor in English and Director of the Armstrong College Masquers 






** Part-time instructors 



\n\ii\Kii; \ti<>\ 



Euzabi in Pound, Georgia State College for Women, Stale Teachers 
College 

Director of StlideiU (.enter 

\\w Cone Setle, \. I. \.. Armstrong College; 15. V. University of 
( Georgia 

Ass't. Registrar un</ Secretary to (he Dean of Students 

Dorothy M. THOMPSOM, A. M., Monmouth College; M. A., North- 
western I Diversity; Certificate of Psychiatric Social Work. 
Western Reserve University 

Instructor in Psychology and Sociology 

•CARMEN Torrie, B. S.. Concord College; M. S., University of Ten- 
nessee 
Director of Athletics and Instructor in Physical Education 

**Anne Wilson, B. M.. Wesleyan Conservatory; Graduate Work, Cor- 
nell University 

Director of the Glee Club 

Helen C. Wolfe, B. S., Columbia University; M. S., Florida State 
University 

Instructor in Home Economics 

Gladys Nichols Zilch, Diploma from the Gregg School of Chicago 
Instructor in Commerce 



* On leave of absence with the Armed Forces. 
** Part-time instructors 



Ill 

III 




if* 



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1 




1 


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Genera] Information 

Histori \m» Organization 

Armstrong College of Savannah was founded on Ma\ 27. I').')"). I>\ 

the Mayor and Aldermen of the ('it\ o£ Savannah t<» meet a long-felt 
need for a junior college. The first college building was the magnificenl 

home of the late George F. Armstrong, a gift to the city from his widow 
and his daughter. The former home, now called the Armstrong Building, 
is an imposing structure of Italian Renaissance architecture; inside, 
its spacious rooms and marble halls lend an air of dignity; while outside 
it is one of the most beautiful college buildings in the South. 

Over the years, through private donation and public appropriation, 
the campus has been enlarged until now it includes four additional 
buildings: the Lane Building, a gift of the late Mills B. Lane, prominent 
banker; John W. Hunt Memorial Building in which are located the 
Student Center, the Home Economics Department, the Women's Lounge, 
the Dancing Studio, and the Music Room; Herschel V. Jenkins Hall, 
which contains the auditorium, theater for the Armstrong College 
Masquers, and classrooms; and Thomas Gamble Hall, site of science 
lecture rooms and laboratories. 

Three of the buildings face forty-acre Forsyth Park, the most beau- 
tiful park in the city; the other two face Monterey Square, one of the 
carefully planned squares for which Savannah is famous. 

Hodgson Hall, across from Forsyth Park on Whitaker Street, con- 
tains the college library as well as the Library of the Georgia Historical 
Society, to which Armstrong students have access. 

The college is under the control of a commission of six members, 
appointed by the Mayor. In addition, the commission includes as 
ex-officio members the Mayor, the Chairman of the Chatham County 
Board of Education, the Chairman of the County Commissioners, the 
Superintendent of the Board of Education, and the President of the 
Savannah Chamber of Commerce. 

Except for the war years, enrollment has shown a steady increase 
until the present student body numbers approximately four hundred. 
As need arises, the curriculum is enlarged and modified to meet new 
demands. 



ARMSTRONG COLLEGE OF SA\ W.NAH 



Aims 

The college seeks to serve tin' community by giving the men and 
women who attend its classes a better understanding of the world in 
which the\ live and the experience of adapting knowledge to meet the 
obligations and responsibilities of citizenship. 

The student may complete one or more of the following 
specific objectives: 

1. Receive additional liberal education to enrich one's 
life; 

2. Complete the freshman and sophomore years of the 
four-year senior college program leading to the bac- 
calaureate degree; 

3. Finish two years of pre-professional work leading to- 
ward medicine, dentistry, law, home economics, the 
ministry and other professions; 

4. Graduate from a semi-professional program, prepared 
to go into business or industry. 

The college awards the degree of Associate in Arts to students 
completing an approved program. 

Admission to the College 
(For dates see calendar on page 2) 

A student planning to enter Armstrong should obtain from the 
Registrar an "Application for Admission Card." The student should 
complete and return this form to the Registrar's office. REQUEST THE 
HIGH SCHOOL PRINCIPAL. OR THE COLLEGE REGISTRAR (in 
the case of a transfer student). TO SEND A TRANSCRIPT OF 
CREDITS to the Registrar's office, Armstrong College of Savannah. 
Georgia. 

Having checked the student's records for compliance with the mini- 
mum requirements for admission, the Registrar's office will send a 
notice to the student that he has been admitted to the college, together 
with certain physical examination forms which must be completed and 
returned before the student can complete registration. The applicant 
will be notified of the dates of the next testing program. These tests 
do not affect a student's entering Armstrong, but will enable the 
counseling staff to assist him in selecting a program of studv upon 
entrance. STUDENTS ARE REQUIRED TO TAKE THESE TEST 
MEASUREMENTS. 



GENERAL INFORMATION 



lu 01 i k i \ii:\ts For Admission 



\\\ CERTIFICATE 



1. A candidate for admission to Armstrong College of Savannah 

1>\ certificate must be a graduate <>f an accredited high school with -i\ 
teen units of credit. 

2. No subject-matter units are prescribed. The high school pro- 
gram should be of such nature as to give satisfactory preparation for 
beginning college studies. Subjects which may be expected to contribute 
to this end are English composition, literature, natural science, history 
and other social studies, foreign languages, and mathematics. The 
right is reserved to reject an\ applicant whose high school program 
does not indicate adequate preparation for college work. 

3. A record of high school credits earned by the applicant should 
be made out on the proper forms by an official of the high school and 
mailed directly to the office of the Registrar. This certificate becomes 
the property of the college and cannot be returned to the applicant. 

4. Three units in mathematics are a pre-requisite for admission 
to the freshman class in engineering. 



BY EXAMINATION 

Students beyond high school age, who do not meet the above re- 
quirements for admission by certificate, may take the General Educa- 
tional Development tests. The student will be admitted to college on 
the basis of his score. Entrance examinations should be completed at 
least one week before registration. Additional information may be 
secured from the Registrar's office. 



ADMISSION TO ADVANCED STANDING 

Advanced credit will be allowed for work done in other institu- 
tions of proper rank and standing and in certain cases for training 
received in the Armed Forces. Credit toward graduation from transfer 
institutions will be accepted if the student has a general average of "C" 
for all college work completed. To receive a diploma from Armstrong 
College of Savannah, a student must be in attendance for two quarters, 
earn a "C" average and, in addition, must satisfy the requirements of 
a particular course of study. Adults (students over 21 years of age) 
may receive credit for certain college work on the basis of the General 
Educational Development tests at the college level. 



in ARMSTRONG COLLEGE OF SAVANNAH 



ADMISSION OK VETERANS 



Armstrong College will accept veterans who are not high school 
graduates if their official General Educational Development test shows 
scores that indicate the applicant's ability to do college work. Certi- 
ficates of eligibility should be secured from the Veterans Administration 
prior to registration. 



ADMISSION OF SPECIAL STUDENTS 

Adults desiring to enroll in courses for their intrinsic value but 
not desiring transfer credit may be enrolled as special students. Re- 
quirements pertaining to entrance examinations, physical examinations 
and physical education courses do not apply to these students. 

Fees 

Tuition will be charged as follows: 

For 12 quarter hours or more, $55.00. 

For each quarter hour less than 12 quarter hours, $4.60. 

Anyone wishing to audit a course in the day program (but not 
receive college credit) may do so with permission of the instructor by 
paying a fee of $10.00 per course. 

A graduation fee of $7.50 will be collected from each candidate for 
graduation. 

Any student delinquent in the payment of any fee due the college 
will have grade reports and transcripts of records held up, and will 
not be allowed to re-register at the college for a new quarter until the 
delinquency has been removed. 

Each student leaving Armstrong College is entitled to one official 
transcript of his college work. The charge for additional copies is 
$1.00 each. 

A student activity fee of $5.00 will be charged. This fee will 
entitle the student to receive all student publications, and admission to 
college sponsored dances, athletic contests, film programs and all pro- 
ductions of the Masquers. 

All veterans must present a certificate of eligibility the first time 
the) register at Armstrong College. A veteran who has not obtained 



<;i:\r.K\i. i\i <>i;\r\n<>\ n 



■ certificate of eligibility prior t<> registration will l>e required to pa) 

ca&h, which ma) be refunded 1»\ the Business Office upon receipt of 
the certificate. 

Students taking lahorator\ work will be required to pa) a fee f<-r 
materials and equipment This fee is indicated in the description of 
courses found under "Course Descriptions" elsewhere in this bulletin. 

\n\ student who desires to take more than 18 quarter hours per 
quarter must have the approval of his adviser. 

Refunds of fees and tuition will be made ONLY upon written 
application for withdrawal from school. No refunds will be made to 
students dropping a course. The schedule of refunds is given below: 



REFUND SCHEDULE 



Fall Quarter. 1952 



Winter Quarter, 1953 



Spring Quarter, 1953 



First Session Summer 
Quarter, 1953 



Second Session Summer 
Quarter, 1953 



Orientation and Advisement 

Tbe counseling and advisement service of Armstrong College, 
in connection with the office of the Dean of Students, offers help in 
solving problems connected with the student's pursuit of the college 
program. 



Sept. 


26, 2 


n. : 


19, 30, 






80% 


of fees paid 


Oct. 


1, 


2. 










80% 


of fees paid 


Oct. 


3, 


4, 


6, 


7, 


8. 


9, 


60% 


of fees paid 


Oct. 


10, 


ii, 


13, 


14, 


15, 


16, 


40% 


of fees paid 


Oct. 


17, 


18, 


20, 


21, 


22, 


23 


20% 


of fees paid 


Jan. 


2. 


3, 


5, 


6, 


7, 


8, 


80% 


of fees paid 


Jan. 


9, 


10, 


12, 


13, 


14, 


15, 


60% 


of fees paid 


Jan. 


16, 


17, 


19, 


20. 


21, 


22. 


40% 


of fees paid 


Jan. 


23, 


24, 


26, 


27, 


28,29 


20% 


of fees paid 


Mar. 


23, 


24, 


25, 


26, 


27, 


28, 


807> 


of fees paid 


Mar. 


30, 


31, 










60% 


of fees paid 


April 


1, 


2, 


3, 


4, 






60% 


of fees paid 


April 


5, 


6, 


7, 


8. 


9, 


10, 


407o 


of fees paid 


April 


11, 


12, 


13, 


14, 


15, 


16 


20% 


of fees paid 


June 


15, 


16, 


17, 








80% 


of fees paid 


June 


18, 


19, 


20, 








607o 


of fees paid 


June 


22, 


23, 


24. 








40% 


of fees paid 


June 


25. 


26, 


27 








20% 


of fees paid 


July 


27, 


28, 


29, 








80%, 


of fees paid 


July 


30, 


31. 










607o 


of fees paid 


Aug. 


1 












607o 


of fees paid 


Aug. 


3. 


4. 


5, 








407* 


of fees paid 


Aug. 


6, 


7, 


8 








207o 


of fees paid 



1 2 ARMSTRO NG COLLEGE OF SAVANNAH 

Students arc urged to request help from their instructors when the 
difficult) is one concerned with the suhject itself and having no compli- 
cations. The areas with which the adviser is usually concerned are 
choice of vocation, the planning of work in college, study habits 
general!) and personal adjustment to college life. Those problems 
which do not fit into these general categories either because of greater 
intensity or critical development are referable to community agencies 
outside the college if the student or his guardians so agree. 

During the year 1951-52 the academic advisement of students 
was distributed among the entire faculty so that each instructor carried 
the responsibility for a proportionate number of the entire student 
body registered in the daytime program. Advisement interviews were 
scheduled with each student at least once a quarter and appointments 
for these interviews were mailed from the office of the Dean of Stu- 
dents. These interviews were designed to aid the student in planning 
his program of work in college. In addition to the advisement pro- 
gram, a program of college orientation was set up for Freshman stu- 
dents beginning during Freshman Week and continuing throughout 
the year. Under this program the Freshman class was divided into 
groups of from fifteen to twenty students to meet at 1:30 each Thurs- 
day throughout the year. Attendance was strongly urged and one 
quarter hour's credit was granted for the completion of the full year. 
During the year a similar program for Sophomores was instituted. 

Library 

Hodgson Hall houses not only the library of Armstrong College, 
but also that of the Georgia Historical Society. Since all books are 
on open shelves, students have immediate access to both collections. 
The reading room, which has recently been redecorated, is well lighted, 
most attractive and popular among the students. They are urged to 
enjoy this room which contains fiction, biography, magazines, books 
in foreign languages, and our phonograph on which the students may 
hear their favorite records. It opens into a garden, well equipped 
with outdoor furniture, a pleasant place to relax or study. 

The library's holdings consist of a very good collection of standard 
reference books and fiction totaling over 10.000 volumes. There are 
more than 100 periodical subscriptions, including five newspapers, 
four of which are dailies. 

The library is open on certain evenings for the use of the Evening 
college students, and each school day from 8:30 a. m. to 5:30 p. m. 

In addition to the resources of the college library, students are en- 
couraged to use the Savannah Public Library, which has a good 



GENERAL INFORMATION 13 

reference department and much material <>f interest to students, includ- 
ing a large collection of fiction, government documents, microfilm 
copies of newspapers, and music records. Tin- main building is on 
Bull Street and has a union catalog, listing tin- holdings of the Down- 
town Branch, Water- Wenue Branch, and of tin- Georgia Historical 
Society . 

Mental Health 

The clinic is an integral part of the Public Health Department of 
the (-it\ of Savannah, winch has as its primary functions the develop- 
ment of a community-wide mental health program and the treatment 
of the emotional problems of children and adults. 

In its relation to the college the clinic staff acts as a "group con- 
sultant" to the faculty through the medium of group sessions. The 
purpose of these meetings is to help the college staff conduct a mental 
hygiene program for the students. It is hoped that through this pro- 
gram the students will be able to explore themselves and develop their 
capacities as persons in such a way as to be able to get more out of 
their everyday inter-personal relationships and to assume their personal 
responsibilities as citizens in the community. 

The clinic "team" is composed of a full-time psychiatrist, psy- 
chiatric social worker, psychologist, and two secretaries. 

Very recently the clinic expanded its facilities and moved into 
new, remodeled quarters located on the ground floor in the Lane 
Building at 20 West Gaston Street. 

Evening College 

This part of our program is designed to serve the needs of those 
in the community who wish to continue their formal education by taking 
courses in the late afternoon and evening. Many of these carry full 
college credit which may be applied toward graduation at Armstrong 
or which may be transferred to other institutions for credit. 
Courses are also offered which may or may not carry college credit 
but which will meet special needs and cultural interests of individuals 
and groups in the community. An evening college bulletin will 
be sent on request. 

Audio-Visual Instruction 
Many of the class rooms of the college are equipped with screens 
for the showing of films, which are used extensively by all of the 
departments. In the teaching of English, foreign languages and music, 
visual aids are supplemented by recordings. 



14 ARMSTRONG COLLEGE OF SAV ANNAH 

Home* oming \\i> Open House 

Twice each year the college invites the public to visit the campus. 
The week before Christmas Holidays, Homecoming is celebrated for all 
alumni and students with a parade, a reception, an intercollegiate 
basketball game, and the Christmas dance. All alumni, students and 
their friends are invited to attend. 

During the Spring, the college is open to the general public for 
inspection during its annual Open House. Exhibits are prepared by 
the various departments interpreting the work done in the junior college. 
Those desiring may make tours of the college buildings and attend a 
social hour in the Home Economics Department. 



Student Assistants 

The college employs a number of student assistants each year. 
These students work in the library, science laboratories, business office 
and with the faculty- Those who desire such employment should apply 
to the staff member who is in charge of the work in which he is in- 
terested or to the President of the college. 



Scholarships 

The scholarships which are available to students are listed below. 
Application blanks may be secured from the President's office in the 
Armstrong Building. Those who wish to apply for scholarships for 
the school year beginning in September should file an application in 
the President's office not later than July 15. All applicants are re- 
quired to appear before an oral interview board during the month of 
August. Each applicant will be notified when to appear for this inter- 
view. 



Commission Scholarships 8 for $100.00 each 

(This is a work scholarship) 

, . . c . , , . 5 for S100.00 each 

\rthur Lucas Scholarships. 2 for S100 00 each 

Junior Chamber of Commerce 2 for §100.00 each 

American Business Club 2 for $200.00 for 2 years 

John Helm Maclean Memorial Scholarship 1 for $100.00 

Edward McGuire Gordon Scholarships 1 for $200.00 (Men only) 

Savannah Cas Co. Engineering 1 for $100.00 (Men only) 

Savannah Gas Co. Home Economics 2 for $100.00 each 

Friedman's Jewelers Scholarships 10 for $100.00 each 






GENERAL INFORMATION LS 



'lacemein I Ser> k i: 



The college maintains a placemenl Bervice for tin- benefit of em- 
ployers and students. Anyone seeking part time employment while in 
college, or full time employment after leaving college, should place his 
name on file with the Business Office. 



Commencement Exercises 

Commencement exercises are held each year in June. At this 
time the degree of Associate in Arts is awarded to those students who 
have met the requirements for graduation. At this time recognition 
is given to those students who qualify for scholastic honors. The 
Faculty and Graduates participate in full academic dress. 



Student Center 

The college does not operate a boarding department. The Student 
Center in the Hunt Building is open throughout the day and provides 
light lunches at reasonable prices. The Center also provides recreational 
facilities and houses the Book Store. 



Student Activities 

The entire program of student activities at the college is designed 
to contribute to the development of the whole individual and to assist 
him in becoming an active and helpful member of the community. The 
program is directed by the Dean of Students and the Student Senate, 
which is composed of representatives from each recognized club or 
group. Each student is urged to participate in those activities which 
are of interest to him. 



Athletics 

Basketball is the only sport in which the college fields an inter- 
collegiate team. All other sports at the college are on an intramural 
basis. 



Physical Education Program 

The college requires all students to participate in a physical educa- 
tion program. The program includes intramural competition in several 
sports. Various activities are available, such as swimming, softball, 
archery, tap dancing, modern dancing and tumbling. 



16 ARMSTRONG COLLEGE 01 S W ANNA H 

The Armstrong Film Cli b 

The purpose <>f tin- Armstrong Film Club ia to bring to Savannah 
foreign and American films of the past and present which possess 
outstanding merit. Admission <>f the general public is by purchase of 
membership cards. Armstrong students are admitted on their acti\it\ 
• aid-. Net proceeds oi the club are used to add equipment to the audio- 
\ isual program of the college. 



Publications 

The college publishes the Inkwell, a newspaper: the Mercury, a 
magazine: and the 'Geechee, a yearbook. These afford students an 
opportunity to express their opinions on a wide variety of topics, to 
do creative writing and gain practice in other journalistic activities. 



The Armstrong College Masquers 

The Armstrong College Masquers, with a charter membership of 
over seventy students, was organized in the Fall of 1950. after the 
Savannah Playhouse separated from Armstrong College and was reor- 
ganized as The Little Theatre, Inc. 

The Masquer organization's goal is to furnish enjoyment and 
appreciation of the drama for both participants and spectators through 
a balanced presentation of popular and classic theatre. 

Masquer membership is open to all students interested in any phase 
of the theatre: acting, designing, lighting, make-up. costuming, and 
other production skills. 

An affiliate of the Masquers is the Armstrong Radio Workshop, 
formed to offer interested students an opportunity to develop techniques 
of radio broadcasting. 



Glee Club 

The Armstrong Glee Club was organized in September, 1949. Its 
members are drawn from the student body and faculty. Besides giving 
two complete concerts at the college, one at Christmas and one in the 
Spring, the group has sung for many civic clubs in Savannah. 

Rehearsals of one hour duration are held three times a week. 
Membership is open to all interested students. 



Genera] Regulations 

\i»\ is] \n \ i \\D l'i.\< i \n .\ i Tests 

To help a student find himself and select a definite objective earlj 
in his college program, the Armstrong staff administers t<> each entering 

freshman a -fries of interest, aptitude, and achievement tests. In tin- 
Fall, these arc given during I reshman Week and are scored prior to 
the student's interview with an adviser. On the basis of these objective 
measurements, the student's previous record, bis interest and his family 
counsel, the student with the aid of his adviser decides on a program 
of stud) which will enable him to accomplish his purpose. 



Physical Examinations 

Each da) school student must submit a completed physical exami- 
nation report on the forms furnished by the college before he can 
complete his registration. A chest X-ray is also required. On the 
basis of the examinations, the physical education department will 
adapt a program of training and recreation to individual requirements. 
This regulation is not applicable to students enrolled only in the 
Evening College. 

Course Load 

The unit of work for a regular student is 12-18 quarter hours per 
quarter. A nominal schedule of sixteen quarter hours presupposes that 
the average student will devote approximately forty-eight hours per 
week to his college classes and to his preparation therefor. 

Permission to enroll for more than 18 quarter hours will be 
granted when curricular requirements make such action necessary, or 
when evidence as to the capacity of the student seems to justify that the 
privilege be granted. No student will be allowed to register for more 
than 21 hours in any one quarter. 

Admission to Class 

Students will be admitted to class when the instructor is furnished 
an official class card indicating that he has completed his registration 
and paid his fees in the Business Office. 

Conduct 

Compliance with the regulations of the faculty and the Armstrong 
College Commission is assumed. The use on the campus of intoxi- 
cating beverages, gambling, and hazing are prohibited. The facultv 
approved the recommendation of the Student Senate for consideration 



18 ARMSTRONG COLLEGE OF SAVANNAH 

and handling of honor infractions in class work. This provision and 
other instructions contained in the Armstrong Handbook are official 
regulations. 

Reports and Grades 

It is felt 1>\ Armstrong that students in college should be held 
accountable for their own scholarship. Accordingly, report cards, 
warnings of deficient scholarship and other such notices are not sent out 
to parents or guardians by the college except on request. Instead the 
students themselves receive these reports and are expected to contact 
their advisers whenever their work is unsatisfactory. Report cards 
are issued at the end of each quarter. Reports of failing grades are 
issued in the middle of each quarter. Each student has access to an 
adviser and in addition, the Dean of Students, and all instructors are 
available to help and advise any student seeking assistance. 

Reports are based on the following system of grading: 

A plus Exceptional 4 honor points per quarter hour 

A Excellent 3 honor points per quarter hour 

B Good 2 honor points per quarter hour 

C Fair 1 honor point per quarter hour 

D Poor No honor points per quarter hour 

E Incomplete Incomplete must be removed before 

mid-term of the following quartt-r 

F Failure Course must be repeated 

W Withdrew Course must be repeated 

W/F Withdrew Failing Course must be repeated 

A student who receives an ;, E ,: I incomplete grade) should con- 
sult his instructor at once and arrange to complete the requirements of 
the course. An "E" grade which has not been removed by the middle of 
the succeeding quarter automatically becomes an fc 'F." An "E" grade 
becomes an "F" if the course is repeated. 



Honors 

Students who have been in attendance for three consecutive quar- 
ters taking a normal load and achieving an average grade of "B" or 
better with no grade below that of "C" will be placed on the Permanent 
Dean's List. This list is published each June in the commencement 
program. 

Graduates who meet the requirements for the Permanent Dean's 
List and who are graduating with an average of three honor points 
per quarter hour, will be designated as graduating summa cum laude 



GENERAL INFORMATION L9 



(with highest distinction). The designation cum laude (with distinc- 
tion) will be bestowed upon those meeting the above requirements 
with an average of two honor points per quarter hour. 

\ \ aledictorian w ill be selected l>\ the graduating class from the five 
students with the highest scholastic averages in the work completed 

before the term in which the students graduate. 

Students who make a grade of "B ' or better in each course during 
an) quarter will be placed on the Dean's Scholastic Attainment List. 



Attendance 

Students are expected to attend classes as scheduled. Any absence, 
whatsoever, from class work entails a loss to the student. 

A student who has been absent from class for a valid reason should 
have the absence excused with a written statement to his instructor 
who will initial it. The student will then file this form in the 
Registrar's office. Excuses must be submitted within seven days from 
the date the student returns to school: otherwise the absence will not 
be excused. 

A student who has unexcused absences equal in number to the times 
the class meets in one week, and has one additional unexcused absence, 
will be dropped from class. The instructors will notify the Registrar's 
office when a student should be dropped. The Registrar's office will 
notify the student. Grades assigned to those who have been dropped 
will be either W or W-F, depending on the status of the student at the 
time he is dropped from class. 

Attendance at bi-weekly assemblies is required. 

Withdrawals 

A formal withdrawal, presented to the President in writing, is a 
pre-requisite for honorable dismissal from, or re-entrance into, this 
institution. Any student planning to withdraw should immediately 
make such intentions known to the administration of the college in 
writing. This notice is required to receive any authorized refunds. 

In order that a student may not receive a failing grade on his 
permanent record card in the Registrar's office, he should formally with- 
draw from any class which he discontinues by securing the instructor's 
written approval. This written approval should be filed in the Regis- 
trar's office. 



20 ARMSTRONG COLLEGE OF SAVANNAH 

Reqi [REMENTS for Gradi \ti<»\ 

The requirements for graduation from Armstrong College of Sa- 
vannah are as follows: 

1. The completion of a program of study listed under '"Cl'RRI- 
CULUMS" with an average grade of "C." 

2. One-third of the work required for graduation should be 
completed at Armstrong College. 

3. Not more than one-fourth of the total work required for 
graduation may be met by correspondence courses. 

Candidates for graduation should make application in the Regis- 
trar's office two quarters prior to the expected date of graduation. 



Recommendations 

The recommendations issued by the college are based on the 
grades the student earns, his student activity record, and the opinions 
expressed by his instructors on a special student rating form. 

The files of the Registrar's office which include all permanent 
records are consulted regularly by representatives of the Federal 
Bureau of Investigation, the Civil Service, the local Credit Bureau and 
other agencies having access to confidential records. A good college 
record is of vital importance to a student. 



Curriculums 



General 

Before registration, the studenl should PLAN \ PROGRAM OF 
STUD^ \\ 1TII \\ IDVISER. Even if a student knows what courses 
are required for graduation, he Bhould have on record in tin- office 

of the Dean of Students a copy of his program. 

The Associate of Arts degree is conferred upon all students who 
complete at Armstrong College one <»f the programs outlined in the 
catalog. 



When a student wishes to change his objective or his program of 
study, he must discuss these changes with his adviser. 



If a student plans to transfer to another institution either before 
or after graduation it is essential that he determine what courses must 
be completed at Armstrong in order to conform with the degree re- 
quirements of the institution to which he wishes to transfer. 



The Core Curriculum 

There are certain bodies of knowledge and certain skills indispen- 
sable to every college trained man and woman. The understanding of 
one's environment and man's struggle to adapt it to useful ends, the 
ability to communicate his thoughts and feelings; right group-attitudes 
and coordinated physical activity — these objectives are set up in the 
following courses required of all students desiring to graduate. 



Freshman year: English 11-12-13; History 11-12-13; ten quarter 
hours of a laboratory science, and Physical Education 11-12-13. 



Sophomore year: English 21-22-23 and three quarters of physical 
education. Students enrolled in certain terminal courses described 
below may substitute English 20 and English 28 for English 21-22-23. 



Students graduating in less than the six' quarters of the regular 
session may reduce their physical education requirements accordingly. 
Physical education should be taken in the proper sequence and two 
courses should not be scheduled in any one quarter. 



22 



\RMSTRONG COLLEGE OF SAVANNAH 



Course Numbers 

Courses which arc offered in the <la\ program are assigned a 
number which is less than 100. All Evening College courses are num- 
bered above 100. 



ASSOCIATE IN ARTS DEGREE 



Concentration 
Business Administration 



Senior College Preparatory 



First Year 

English 11. 12. 13 — Freshman English 9 
History 11. 12. 1.3— Western 

Civilization 9 

Physical Education 11. 12. 13 3 

Laboratory Science 10 

Mathematics 16 — College Algebra 5 

Mathematics 19 — Finance 3 

Electives 9 

TOTAL 48 



Second \ lab 

English 21. 22, 23— Sophomore Eng- 
lish 9 

Physical Education 3 

Commerce 24. 25 — Accounting 10 

Economics 21. 24 — Principles and 

Problems 10 

Political Science 13 — Govt, of U. S. 5 
Elective- 11 

TOTAL 48 



* A student should consult the catalog of his prospective senior college for 
required subjects. College- differ as to what subjects are required for this 



Concentration — Business Adminstration 



Termlnal 



Many students will not continue their formal education after 
leaving Armstrong. .To these students the college gives the opportunity 
to select those subjects which have a vocational value. Sufficient 
general education is included in the core curriculum to make this a 
well-rounded program. 



First Year 
English 11. 12. 13 — Freshman Eng- 
lish .9 

History 11. 12, 13— Western Civiliza- 
tion 9 

Physical Education 11. 12. 13 3 

Laboratory Science 10 

Economics 21, 24 — Principles and 

Prohlem< 10 

Electives 7 



TOTAL 



48 



Second Year 
English 21. 22. 23. 9 

or English 20. 28. 10 

Physical Education 3 

Commerce 24. 25 — Accounting 10 

Commerce 27 — Business Law 5 

Commerce Electives: 

Typing 

Calculator & Comptometer 

Shorthand 

Commerce 26 — Intermediate Acct. 

Commerce 28 — Business Law 
Electives < other » 8 or 9 

TOTAL 48 



CI RRIC1 l.l MS 



23 



C.ON( IN 1 1; M ION S< 11 Si 1 



S] NIOR ( lOLLECE PREPARATORY 



Tin- course of st u«l \ is designed f«>r those students who wish t<> 
major in the fields of Biology, Chemistry, Physics or Mathematics. At 
the time of registration the student musl Bpecifj his major field, and 

it will be indicated at the time of graduation on the permanent record 

cards. The major of Biology will include the fields of Pre-Medicine, 

Pre-Dentistrv. Pre-PharmaC) and Medical Technology.* 



This program is so constructed that only slight variations are 
necessan to prepare a student for his particular major and it is the 
responsibility of each student to see that his program of study conforms 
to his senior college requirements. A minimum of 96 quarter hours 
is required for graduation. 



First Year 
English 11. 12. 13 — Freshman Eng- 
lish 9 

Historj U, 12, 13— Western Civiliza- 
tion 9 

Physical Education 11, 12, 13 3 

Mathematics 16 — College Algebra. . 5 

Mathematics 17 — Trigonometry 5 

Electives & Major Requirements... 



Second Year 
English 21, 22, 23— Sophomore Eng- 
lish 9 

Physical Education 3 

* Physics 11, 12— General 12 

* French or German 10 

Electives & Major Requirements 



The above courses are required of all students (except as noted) 
enrolling in this concentration. 

MAJOR REQUIREMENTS: 



Major in Biology: 
Biology 14, 15 — General Zoology 
Biology 23 — Comparative Vertebrate 

Anatomy 
Chemistry 14, 15 — General 
Chemistry 24 — Qualitative Analysis 
Chemistry 25 — Quantitative Analysis 
Major in Mathematics: 

Mathematics 18 — Plane Analytic 

Geometry 

Chemistry or Biology (10 hrs. 

minimum) 



Major in Chemistry: 

Chemistry 14, 15 — General Chemistry 
Chemistry 24 — Qualitative Analysis 
Chemistry 25 — Quantitative Analysis 
Mathematics 18 — Plane Analytic 

Geometry 
Major in Physics: 

Mathematics 18 — Plane Analytic 

Geometry 
Chemistry or Biology (10 hrs. 

minimum) 



*Students pursuing a terminal course in Medical Technology may substitute 
in certain cases, courses recommended by the American Society of Clinical 
Pathologists. 



24 



ARMSTRONG COLLEGE 01 SA\ \\\ \H 



CON< ENTH M ion COMMER( I. Se< RE l \RI VI. 



Tkkmin m. 



This program is designed t<» meet the needs of those students who 
wish to qualif) for clerical positions in business. 



Firm "> i \i; 
English 11, 12. 13— Freshman Eng- 
lish . 9 
History 11, 12, 13— Western Civiliza- 
tion 9 

Physical Education 11. 12 13 3 

Laboratory Science 10 

Commerce lla-b-c — Typing 6 

Commerce 12a-b-c — Shorthand 15 

TOTAL 52 



Si ' OND ^ EAB 

< lommerce 2 1 \« counting 5 

* English 20- -Composition 5 

Commerce 17 — Office Practice 5 

Commerce 21a-b-c — Typing 6 
Commerce 22a-l»-c — Shorthand 1") 

* English 28 — Public Speaking 5 
IMi\ -ieal Education 3 



TOTAL 



44 



English 21, 22, 23 may be substituted for these English courses. 



Concentration — Home Economics Senior College Preparatory 

The vocational opportunities in this field are numerous. Prepara- 
tion for marriage and personality development are other objectives of 
the home making courses. 



First Year 
En glish 11. 12. 13 — Freshman Eng- 
lish 9 

History 11. 12, 13— Western Civiliza- 
tion 9 

Physical Education 11, 12. 13 3 

Home Economics 10 — Orientation 3 

Home Economics 11 — Clothing 5 

Home Economics 12 — Foods 5 

Mathematics 11 — Basic Mathematics 3 

\rt 11 — Creative 5 

Chemi-tr\ 14. 15 — General 12 

TOTAL 54 



Second Year 
English 21. 22. 23— Sophomop 9 
Physical Education 3 
Home Economics 21- — Home Fur- 
nishing 5 

Biolog} ^ 10 

Psychology 21 — Introductory 5 

Home Economic- Elective 5 
Sociology 21 — Marriage and The 

Familv 5 



TOTAL 



12 



Concentration — Home Economic s 



Terminal 



1 hi> course is designed to meet the needs of those women who plan 
to complete their college work at Armstrong. Sufficient electives are 
allowed to enable the student to select commerce subjects which have 
a vocational value or cultural subjects for worthy use of leisure time. 



( I RRIC1 1. 1 MS 



25 



FlRSI \ i \M 

English II. 11'. 13 Freshman 
Histon I'- 12, 13 Western Civiliza- 
tion 
Physical Education 11. 12, 13 
Laboratory Science 
Hdiiu • Economics 1 1 ( Hothing 
Home Economics I- Foods 
Psychology 21 Introductory 
Elective 

TOTAL 





§] l OND ^ i \i: 




9 


Lish 21, 22, 23 Sophomore 


9 




Physi< al Education 




<> 


Home Economies 21 Home r ur- 




:\ 


nishing 


:> 





Home Economics 22 Nutrition 


5 


.") 


Sociology 21 Marriage ami The 




5 


Family 


.") 


5 


Electives 


18 



:.i 



TOTAL 



IS 



Concentration — 

Physical Education 



Senior College 
Preparatory 



The Physical Education Department is qualified to provide the 
first two years of preparation for a major in the field of health and 
physical education for those students planning to enter the field of 
education or supervised recreation. 



First Year 

English 11. 12, 13— Freshman 9 

Histon 11, 12. 13— Western Civiliza- 
tion 9 

Physical Education 11. 12. 13 3 

Mathematics 11. 12. 13— Basic 9 

or 

Mathematics 16 — College Algebra . 5 

Mathematics 17 — Trigonometry 5 

Physics or Chemistry 10 

Electives 5 

Home Economics 22 — Nutrition 5 

TOTAL 50 



Second Year 

English 21, 22, 23— Sophomore 9 

Physical Education 3 

Anatomy & Physiology In, 2n, 3n 9 
•Physical Education 23 — Senior 
Life Saving and Swimming for 

Men 2 

'-Physical Education 24 — Boxing for 

Teachers 2 

Psychology 21 — Introductory 5 

Psychology 23— Child 5 

Sociology 21 — Marriage and The 

Family 5 

Electives 6 

TOTAL 46 



* Women will take Physical Education 29 and one other Physical Education 
course. 



Concentration — Liberal Arts 



Senior College Preparatory 



This program is recommended for candidates for an A. B. degree, 
pre-education, pre-law, pre-ministerial, journalism, and other pre- 
professional concentrations. 

ARMSTRONG COLLEGE 

LIBRARY 



26 ARMSTRO N G COLLEGE OF SAVANNAH 

I'lKM "l BAB v i « OND ^ EAR 

English 11. 12. 13 Freshman 9 English 21. 22, 23— Sophomore 9 

Histor) 11, 12. 13 Western <mli- Physical Education 3 

zation 9 Two <>f the following courses: 10 

Physical Education 11. 12. 13 3 Histor) 25 Recenl European 

Laboratory Science 10 Political Science 13 American 

'Mathematics 11. 12, 13 — Basic 9 Government 

or Psychology 21 — Introductor\ 

Mathematics 16 College Ugebra.. 5 Sociology 20 — Introductory 

Mathematics 17 Trigonometry 5 Economics 21 — Principles 10 

"Foreign Language 10 "Science 10 

Elective* 14 

TOTAL 50 TOTAL 46 

: \ student applying for admission to a senior college which does not require 
the amount indicated of this subject may. with the approval of his adviser, sub- 
stitute other courses required by the senior institution during his fir-t \\\<> 
years. 

Concentration — Liberal Arts Terminal 

A student in the Libral Arts, Terminal program may select the 
remainder of his electives from courses offered by the college in order 
to prepare for a vocation or to pursue a special interest. 

First Year Second Year 

English 11, 12, 13— Freshman 9 English 21, 22. 23— Sophomore .9 

History 11, 12, 13— Western Civili Physical Education 3 

zation 9 * Electives 36 

Physical Education 11, 12, 13 3 

Natural Science 10 

Mathematics 11, 12 — Basic, or 6 

Mathematics 16 — College Algebra. . 5 

♦Electives 12 

TOTAL 48 or 49 TOTAL 48 

* A student must elect 20 hours from at least three of the following de- 
partments: Foreign Language. Political Science. Economics. Fine Arts, Home 
Economics, Psychology, Sociology. 



One Year Programs 
Concentration — Engineering Senior College Preparatory 

This program will satisfy degree requirements for the first year 
of most types of engineering but should be varied for certain degrees 
such as chemical, electrical, etc. The student should obtain a catalog 
from the senior college he plans to attend and check this program 
against the requirements. The courses required for the freshman year 
have been worked out in consultation with the Georgia Institute of 
Technology. 



CI RRIC1 I l MS 27 



uiemistrj 1 l. L5 General L2 

English 11. 12, 13 Freahmnn 9 
Engineering 11. 12. 13 Drawing 

EagnMetittf 26 Plane Snrveyhnj 2 

History 11. 12. 13 Western Civilization (oi Modern Language) () 
Mathematics 16, 17. 18 College Ugebra, Trigonometry and Analytic 

Geometry 13 

Physical Education 11. 12. 13 3 

TOTAL 59 



CON< ENTRATION — STENOGRAPHIC 

A student who has only year to spend in college may herein master 
some of the tools that will enable him to earn a livelihood. 

Commerce lla-b-c Typing 6 

Commerce 12a-b-e Shorthand IS 

Commerce 17 — Office Practice 5 

Commerce 24 - — Accounting 5 

English 20 — Composition 5 

English 28 — Public Speaking 5 

Physical Education 11. 12, 13 3 

Electives 5 

TOTAL 49 



Concentration — Nursing 

Armstrong College offers the following courses in cooperation with 
the Warren A. Candler School of Nursing. With the permission of the 
instructor and the approval of the student's adviser, a student not en- 
rolled in the School of Nursing may take any of the following courses: 

Anatomy and Physiology In. 2n, 3n 9 

Chemistry In 5 

Sociology In 5 

Physical Education In 1 

Bacteriology In. 2n 6 

Nutrition In 4 

Psychology In 5 

TOTAL 35 



Course Descriptions 

General 

Armstrong ("ollege reserves the right to I 1 I withdraw any course 
for which less than ten students register. (2) limit the enrollment in 
a n \ course or class section. (3) fix the time of meeting of all classes 
and sections, and ill offer such additional courses as demand and 
staff personnel warrant. 

No credit will be given in beginning courses in commerce and 
languages where the same or similar courses have been presented for 
admission from high school. 

Where two or more courses are listed under one description, no 
credit for graduation will be given until the sequence is completed. 

After each course, the first number listed is the number of hours 
of lecture; the second, the number of hours of laboratory and the 
third, the number of quarter hours of credit the course carries; e. g. 
(3-3-4) means 3 hours of class, 3 hours of laboratory, 4 quarter hours 
of credit. 

ARTS 
(See Fine Arts) 

BIOLOGY 

Anatomy and Physiology ln-2n-3n* (2-2-3). Fall. Winter and 
Spring. Laboratory fee, $2.50. 

A three quarter course in human anatomy and physiology. The 
gross anatomy, some histology and physiology of the organ systems are 
presented in order to give the student an understanding of the human 
body as a basis for further studies in clinical nursing. The labora- 
tory work includes some dissection of the lower vertebrates and ele- 
mentary experiments in physiology. 

Biology 14?-A — General Zoology (3-4-5). Fall and Winter. Labora- 
tory fee, 83.50. 

Biology 14-Z? — General Zoology (3-6-6). Fall and Winter. Lab- 
oratory fee, $3.50. 

•These courses are transferable to senior colleges toward a B. S. 
in Nursing. 






col RSI Dl S< RIPTIONS 



Introduction to animal BtniCtureS and function and a BUTVe) of 

the invertebrate pin la. Laboratory work on representative Bpecies oi 

each phylum. 

Biology 15'A General Zoology (3-4-5). Winter and Spring. Lab- 
orator) fee, $3.50. Prerequisite: Biolog) I I. 

Biology iS-B General Zoology (3-6-6). Winter and Spring. Lab« 
oratars fee, $3.50. Prerequisite: Biology 14. 

Studs of vertebrate structure and function, using selected vertebrate 
material for laboratory dissection. Conclude- with a -study of the 
principles of Evolution and Genetics. 

Biology 16-17 — Human Biology (5-0-5). Winter and Spring. 

\ two quarter course for terminal students beginning with a survey 
of the basic biological principles and followed by a study of the structure 
and function of the human body. Principles of Evolution and Genetic* 
will be discussed in the last quarter. 

Biology 22 — Invertebrate Zoology (3-6-6). Spring. Laboratory 
fee. S5.00. Prerequisite: Biology 14 and 15. 

A concentrated study of the structure and function of invertebrates 
including their economic relation to man. Field trips included for nat- 
ural habitat study. 

Biology 23 — Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy (3-6-6). Fall. 
Laboratory fee. $5.00. Prerequisite: Biology 14 and 15. 

A study of the anatomy and evolution of the organ systems of the 
vertebrates. Laboratory yvork on Squalus, Necturus and the cat. 

Bacteriology \n-2n* (2-2-3). Winter and Spring. Laboratory fee. 
$2.50. 

An introduction to micro-organisms as living organisms and as 
pathogens. The structure, life history and public health importance of 
representative viruses, bacteria, molds, protozoa and helminthes are con- 
sidered. The laboratory work includes the techniques of culturing bac- 
teria and the study of the scientific basis of antiseptic and aseptic 
procedures. 



30 VRMSTRONG COLLEGE OF SWANNAH 



Biology 124— Horticulture (2-0-2). Kail. (Not offered in 1952-53). 
Stud) of grasses, flowers, and shrubber) for home gardeners in 
Savannah area. 



CHEMISTRY 

Chemistry \n (4-2-5). Fall. Laboratory fee, $2.50. 

The purpose of this course is to acquaint students with the prin- 
ciples of inorganic, organic and physiological chemistry with some 
special applications to nursing practice. 

Chemistry 14 — General Inorganic Chemistry (4-4-6). Fall and 
Winter. Laboratory fee, $3.50. 

In this course the students will study the chemistry of some im- 
portant non-metallic elements including a systematic treatment of 
chemical principles and their applications. 

Chemistry 15 — General Inorganic (4-4-6). Winter and Spring. 
Laboratory fee, S3. 50. Prerequisite: Chemistry 14. 

A continuation of Chemistry 14, including a general survey of the 
metallic elements. 

Chemistry 24 — Qualitative In-organic Analysis (3-6-6). Spring. 
Laboratory fee, $5.00. Prerequisite: Chemistry 15. 

A study of the fundamental theories of qualitative analysis of 
common cations and anions by semi-micro methods. 

Chemistry 25 — Quantitative Inorganic Analysis (3-6-6). Winter. 
Laboratory fee, $5.00. Prerequisite: Chemistry 24 or approval of the 
instructor. 

A stud) of the fundamental theories and applications of quantita- 
tive analysis involving volumetric and gravimetric methods, with the 
emphasis placed on the volumetric methods. 

Chemistry 26 — Quantitative Inorganic Analysis (2-8-6). Offered 
whenever justified by demand. Laboratory fee, S5.00. Prerequisite: 
Chemistry 25 or approval of the instructor. 

In this course emphasis is placed on the laboratory applications 
of quantitative analysis involving some more advanced gravimetric 

methods and instrumental analvsis. 



C01 RSI hi S( RIPTIONS 31 



COMMERi I 

Commerce \\d-I> Beginning Typing (0-5-2). Fall and Winter 
Laboratory fee, 13.50. 

This course consists of introductory instruction in the technical 
features and care of the machine, position, fingering, proper technique 

and master) <»f the keyboard. \n average speed <>f 1<> words a minute 
is attained at the end of the second course. 

Commerce lie — Intermediate Typing (0-5-2). Spring. Laboratory 
fee. $3.50. Prerequisite: Commerce lla-b or equivalent. 

\ t\ pewriting course in which emphasis is placed on speed building 
and accuracy. Special typing problems such as business letters, minutes, 
notices, stencil cutting and carbon copies are stressed. 

Commerce I2a-b — Beginning Shorthand (5-0-5). Fall and Winter. 

Complete theory of Gregg Shorthand in the manual. Additional 
reading and dictation given from the Speed Studies. 

Commerce 12c — Intermediate Shorthand (5-0-5). Spring. 

Dictation and transcription of new and studied material. Student 
is required to take dictation at the rate of eighty words a minute. 

Commerce 13a — Burroughs Calculator and Comptometer (0-5-2). 
Fall. Laboratory fee, $3.50. 

The objective of this course is to build speed and accuracy in the 
operation of the Burroughs Calculator and Comptometer and a thorough 
review of business mathematics. This quarter is devoted to the opera- 
tion of the four fundamentals in arithmetic on the calculator. 

Commerce 136 — Burroughs Calculator and Comptometer (0-5-2). 
Winter. Laboratory fee. $3.50. 

The following business mathematics is reviewed and applied on 
the machine during this quarter: decimal equivalents, split division, in- 
voicing over the fixed decimal, percentages, discounts, and chain dis- 
counts, costs, selling and rate of profit. 

Commerce 13c — Burroughs Calculator and Comptometer (0-5-21. 
Spring. Laboratory fee, $3.50. 

The third quarter is a continuation of business problems on the 



32 ARMSTRONG COLLEGE OF S W ANNAH 

machine. The transactions covered arc reciprocals figuring grain. 
cipher, division, prorating cost and expenses, gross and dozen in in- 
voicing inventories. 

Commerce L7 — Office /'/tic/ice (5-0-5). Spring. 

Typical business office situations arc duplicated as nearly as pos- 
sible. Practical problems deal with typing, operation of the mimeo- 
graph, filing and office courtesy. 

Commerce 21a — Advanced Typing (0-5-2). Fall. Laboratory 
fee, $3.50. Prerequisite: Commerce lie or equivalent. 

Advanced typing is a course in the acquisition of speed and accur- 
acy including various legal forms and papers, manuscripts and business 
papers. 

Commerce 216 — A continuation of Commerce 21a (0-5-2). Winter. 
Laboratory fee, $3.50. 

Commerce 21c — A continuation of Commerce 216 (0-5-2). Spring. 
Laboratory fee, $3.50. An average of 60 words a minute is attained. 

Commerce 22a — Advanced Shorthand r (5-0-5) . Fall. Prerequisites: 
Commerce 12a, b, c. 

A course in which the principles of Gregg Shorthand are applied 
in developing skill and accuracy in writing shorthand and in transcrib- 
ing. The first half year is devoted to dictation of general business ma- 
terial: the second half, to dictation material applying to major vocations. 

Commerce 226 — A continuation of Commerce 22a (5-0-5). Winter. 

Commerce 22c — A continuation of Commerce 226 (5-0-5). Spring. 
A speed of 120 words a minute is required. 

Commerce 23a — Advanced Calculator and Comptometer (0-5-2). 
Fall. Laboratory fee, $3.50. 

The next two quarters are devoted to the application of the machine 
and business mathematics to the following businesses: drugs, hardware, 
electrical, plumbing, contracting, wholesale paper, pay roll, packing 
house, creameries and dairies, laundries, steel and iron, department 
stores, banks, lumber, petroleum, railroads. 



C01 RSI DESCRIPTIONS 



Commerce 236 I continuation of Commerce 2Za (0-5-2). Winter. 
Laboratory fee, $3.50. 

Commerce '2'.\e Advanced Calculator and Comptometer (0-5-2). 
Spring. Laboratory fee, $3.50. 

Speed, skill and accuracy in the operation <>f tin- machine arc 
stressed in thi> lasl period. 

Commerce 24 — Principles of Accounting, Introductory (5-0-5). 

\n introduction to the fundamental princples and procedures of 
accounting, including a study of the journal, the ledger, accounting state- 
ments, controling accounts, special journals and the accounting system. 

Commerce 25 — Principles of Accounting. Introductory (5-0-5). 
Winter. Prerequisite: Commerce 24. 

An application of accounting principles to certain problems such 
as the proprietorship, the partnership, the cororation, departmental 
operations, manufacturing accounts and the analysis of accounting 
statements. 

Commerce 26 — Principles of Accounting, Intermediate (5-0-5). 
Spring. Prerequisite: Commerce 25. 

Basic accounting theory with emphasis on the various forms of 
business organization, assets, liabilities and reserves. 

Commerce 27 — Business Law (5-0-5). Winter. 

Contracts: offer and acceptance, consideration, performance, rights 
of third parties and discharge. Agency: creation of an agency, powers, 
liabilities of principal and agent. Negotiable instruments: elements of 
negotiability, endorsement, and transfer, liabilities of parties, discharge. 

Commerce 28 — Business Law (5-0-5). Spring. Prerequisite: Com- 
merce 27. 

Partnership: formation, powers, liabilities of partners, termination. 
Corporation: formation, powers, rights of security holders, types of 
securities. Sales: vesting of title, warrants, remedies. 

Commerce 115 — Business Correspondence (5-0-5). Fall. 

A study of business correspondence, letters, information reports, 



U \KMSTK ONG CO LLEGE OF SA VANNAH 

follow-up Bales programs, statistical analysis and inter-office communi- 
cations. Stress is placed on the master) of fundamentals of clear 
writing. 

Commerce 129 — Cost Accounting (5-0-5). Spring. Pre-requisite: 
Commerce 125. 

Methods of determining and distributing costs in manufacturing 
and other concerns, stressing the securing of unit costs under both 
the order and the process methods. 



ECONOMICS 

Economics 21 — Principles of Economics (5-0-5). Fall and Summer. 

A study of the principles behind the economic institutions of the 
present time and an examination of some of the economic problems 
in the modern world. 

Economics 24 — Problems of Economics (5-0-5). Spring. Prere- 
quisite: Economics 21. 

A study of economic problems based upon the principles studied 
in Economics 21. 

Economics 130 — Personnel Administration (5-0-5). Spring. Pre- 
requisites: Elementary Psychology and Economics. 

Through lectures, field trips, and conferences with executives, a 
study is made of the principles and practices in the field of the ad- 
ministration of human relations in industry. Emphasis is given to 
scientific techniques and devices in the development of a well-rounded 
personnel program. 

ENGINEERING 

Engineering 11 — Engineering Drawing (0-6-3). Fall. 

Topics of stud) include lettering, the use of the instruments, ortho- 
graphic projection, auxiliary views, section, pictorial representations. 

Engineering 12 — Engineering Drawing (0-6-3). Winter. Prere- 
quisite: Engineering 11. 

Topics of si in I \ include sections, dimensions, limit dimensions, 
threads, and fastenings, shop processes, technical, sketching, working 
drawings, pencil tracing on paper, reproduction processes. 



C01 RSE DESCRIPTIONS 



Engineering L3 Engineering Drawing (0-6-3). Spring. Prere- 
quisite: Engineering 12. 

Topics of stud) include technical sketching of piping and fitting. 

working drawings, ink tracing on cloth, working drawings from as- 
seinhlies and assemblies from working drawings. 

Engineering 26 — Plane Surveying (1-3-2). Spring. Prerequisite: 

Mathematics 17. 

The theory of practice in chaining, differential and profile leveling, 
traversing, topographic surveying, reduction and plotting of field notes 
and mapping. 



ENGLISH 

English 11 — Freshman English (3-0-3). Fall and Spring. 

A survey of Western Literature, in which books are read complete, 
rather than in selections; a review of grammar and practice in written 
English is also undertaken. English 11-12-13 integrates with History 
11-12-13 for the entire Freshman year. The discussion method is 
consistently used throughout the year. 

English 12 — A continuation of English 11 (3-0-3). Fall and 
Winter. 

English 13 — A continuation of English 12 (3-0-3). Spring and 
Winter. 

English 20 — Grammar (5-0-5). Fall and Winter. 

A general review of grammar, composition and vocabulary. The 
students will have practice is writing themes, making oral reports, and 
in writing business letters. Several books will be assigned for outside 
reading and discussion. 

English 21 — Sophomore English — A Survey of World Literature 
(3-0-3). Fall and Spring. 

This course is designed to give the student a knowledge of the 
most important works of Shakespeare, Milton, Gothe, Keats, Whitman. 
Ibsen and selections from the Bible. The last third of the course will 
be devoted to the study of a number of modern American dramas, and 
modern British and American poetry. 



36 ARMSTRONG COLLEGE OF SAVANNAH 



English 22 A continuation of English 21 (3-0-3). Fall and 
\\ Inter. 

English 23 / continuation of English 22 (3-0-3). Winter and 
Spring. 

English 21 An Introduction to Poetry (5-0-5). Winter (Not 
offered in 1953 > . 

A study of the various types and forms of poetry with special 
emphasis on more recent poetr\. 

English 25 — American Literature I 5-0-5 I . Spring. 

A survey of American Literature and culture. Each student is 
asked to select one particular period or area or author for concentra- 
tion, making reports and writing papers in that phase of the work. 
The course is primarily conducted by reading and discussion. 

English 26 — Advanced Composition I 5-0-5 ) . Winter. 

Advanced practice in composition of all sorts: criticism of themes 
in an effort to learn exposition, description in prose is attempted. 

English 27 — Reading Modern Drama (5-0-5). Spring. 

Class reading and discussion of dramas. The plays will not be 
acted. The course is centered on appreciation of drama, diction, and 
reading ability. 

English 28 — Public Speaking (5-0-5). Winter and Spring. 

Fundamental principles involved in group discussion and the pre- 
paration and delivery of original speeches for formal occasions. The 
physiolog) <>f speech is included. 

English lllx — Freshman English (5-0-5). Fall. Spring and 
Summer. 

This course covers a review of punctuation and the fundamentals 
of grammar, theme writing, and vocabulary building. Also the student 
reads and discusses selections from the works of the most prominent 
literary figures of the Western W^orld. 

English 112y — A continuation of English lll.v (5-0-5). Winter 
and Summer. 

Selections from the works of the following authors will be read: 



( 01 RSI hi S( RIPTIONS 



Homer, Sophocles, Chaucer, Montaigne, Cellini, Voltaire, Checkov, 
Hard\ aa well as those of certain English Romantic poets. 

English \'2\\ Sophomore English (5-0-5). Fall, Spring and 

Summer. 

This course is designed to give the students a knowledge <>f the 

principal works of certain major writer-. The student reads in some 
detail several hundred pages from the works of selected authors whose 

thought or st\le has heen of world-wide significance. The last third of 
the course deals with modern trends in literature and thought. \t 
intervals, students are asked to write papers, and emphasis is constant!) 
placed on the improvement of the students ability to express himself. 

English 122y — A continuation of English 121a (5-0-5). Winter 
and Summer. 

Selections from the works of the following authors will be read: 
Shakespeare. Milton. Goethe. Keats, Whitman, Ibsen, also selection from 
the Bible. The last quarter will be devoted to a consideration of repre- 
sentative works of contemporary writers in England and America. 



FINE ARTS 

Art 11 — Creative Art (2-6-5). Spring. 

Drawing, art principles and design with work in other media at the 
discretion of the instructor. Some application will be made to poster- 
making, lettering and everyday life needs. 

Art 113— -Ceramics (5-0-5). Each quarter. Lab fee, S2.00. 

A beginners course. Instruction is concerned with learning to 
handle clay, to form pottery and sculpture, and to decorate, glaze, and 
fire the pieces made. 

Art 114 — Advanced Ceramics (5-0-5). Each quarter. Lab fee. 
S2.00 

Emphasis is placed on making larger pieces, studving good forms 
suited to the nanature of clay. Instruction in loading and firing the kiln. 

Art 115 — Drauinu. and Painting (5-0-5). Each quarter. Lab fee. 
$2.00. 

An elementary course in expressive pictorial composition, drawing 



38 ARMSTRONG COLLEGE OF SAVANNAH 

and color Still life 18 offered with emphasis on composition, color and 
careful preliminary designs. An introduction to life drawing from the 
model in quick action sketches. Basic work and experimentation is 
encouraged in pencil, charcoal, brush and ink. crayon, tempera and 
oil. Special instruction for students desiring technical introduction 
to spesific media during latter course sessions. -Combined with the 
studio work, are discussions and slide reviews in history and apprecia- 
tion of art. 

Art 116 — Intermediate Drawing and Painting (5-0-5). Each 
quarter. Laboratory fee, $2.00. 

Intermediate course in drawing and painting in a variety of 
media from models and imagination. Preparation for the development 
of finished compositions is stressed. Intermediate drawing from the 
model and memory leading to proficiency in handling the figure at 
rest or in action. Intermediate work in tempera, watercolor, oil 
or other selected media and the methods and techniques of painting. 
Studies in pictorial design and analysis of the work of old and modern 
masters. 

Music 11 — Elementary Theory and Sight Reading (5-0-5). Fall. 

A course designed to teach the student to read music at sight and 
to understand the fundamental principles of music theory. Melodic dic- 
tation, melody writing and an introduction to elementary harmony are 
included. 

Music 12 — Theory ad Harmony (5-0-5). Winter. Prerequisite: 
Music 11. 

A continuation of Music 11, with emphasis on harmony, harmonic 
dictation, four-part harmonic writing. 

Music 20 — Music Appreciation I 5-0-5 ) . Spring. 

A course designed to help the student understand and enjoy great 
music. Several works will be analyzed in detail as to form and struc- 
ture. A text will be used for factual background: class time being con- 
centrated on brief exposition of themes followed by listening to records. 
Music and composers from the Early Christian period up through 
the modern period will be studied. 

FOREIGN LANGUAGES 
French 

French 11-12 — Elementary French (5-0-5). Fall and Winter. 






col RSE DESCRIPTIONS 39 



\ course for beginners. The Bpoken language is studied a> well as 

grammar and reading. 

French 21 — Intermediate French (5-0-5). Fall and Spring. Pre- 
requisite: Two quarters of college French or two years of high school 
French. 

Review grammar, oral practice, reading of selected texts. 

French 22 — Intermediate French, continued I 5-0-5 I . Winter. Pre- 
requisite: Three quarters of college French or three years of high school 
French. 

Further reading of texts, oral and composition practice. 

French 23 — French Literature of the Nineteenth Century (5-0-5). 
Prerequisite: French 22. 

A survey course. Reading of texts, written and oral reports on 
collateral reading. 

French 24 — French Classical Drama (5-0-5). Spring. Prerequisite: 
French 22 (Not offered in 1951-52). 

Selected plays of Corneille, Moliere and Racine. 

German 

German 111 — Elementary German (5-0-5). Fall. 

Elements of the grammar, reading of simple texts and speaking. 
German records, films and photographs. 

German 112 — Intermediate German (5-0-5). Winter. 

Grammar, more reading of selected texts and speaking. German 
records, films and photographs. 

German 121 — Advanced German (5-0-5). Spring. 

Grammar review. Reading of short stories and German magazines. 
Composition and conversation. German records, films and photo- 
graphs. 

Spanish 

Spanish 11-12 — Elementary (5-0-5). Fall and Winter. 

These courses are for the purpose of providing the student with the 
elements of Spanish reading, composition and conversation. 



LO ARMSTRONG COLLEGE OF SAVANNAH 

Spanish 21 Intermediate Spanish (5-0-5). Fall and Spring. 

I hi- course covers grammar review, composition and -fleeted prose 
readings. 

Spanish 22 — Advanced Spanish (5-0-5). Winter. 

The purpose of this course Is to increase the student's facility in 
Spanish composition and conversation. 

Spanish 23 — Commercial Spanish (5-0-5). Spring. 

This course includes a study of business letters and forms used by 
the Spanish-speaking world and drills on the vocabulary of trade, travel 
and communications. 

Spanish 24 — Modern Prose Readings (5-0-5). Spring. 

This course provides intensive reading of nineteenth and twentieth 
century Spanish and Latin American authors. 

Spanish 25 — Comprehensive Reading and Advanced Conversation 
(5-0-5). Spring. 

This course is planned for the student who has had at least three 
quarters, and preferably four quarters, of Spanish. Stress is placed on 
comprehensive reading and conversation based on a selected text. 



History 

History 11 — An Historical Introduction to Contemporary Civiliza- 
tion I 3-0-3 I . Fall and Spring. 

This course comprises a chronological survey of the main currents 
of political, social, religious and philosophical thought in Western Civili- 
zation from the period of the sixth centur\ in Greece to the present time. 

History 12 — A continuation of History 11 (3-0-3). Fall. Winter. 

History 13 — A continuation of History 12 I 3-0-3 I . Winter. Spring. 

In addition to a chronological treatment of events studied in the 
above courses, tin 1 dynamics of Western Civilization are studied in 
works of the following authors: Plato. Lucretius. St. \ugustine. Dante. 
Machiavelli, Descartes, Locke, Swift. Rousseau. Adam Smith. Ricardo. 
Malthus. Bentham, Carlyle, Marx, Shaw and Hersey. 






( 01 RSE DES< RIPTIONS n 



Hi-i«»r\ Ll-12-13 arc required <>f all Btudenta seeking cm Associate 
degree from Armstrong College and arc designed t<> l»<- complementary 
with English Ll-12-13. 

History 22 Latin imerican (5-0-5). Spring. 

This course Burveys the colonial, revolutionary and recenl develop- 
ments in the countries <>f Hispanic \merica. 

History 25 — Recent European History (5-0-5). Spring. 

This course is designed to provide an opportunity for detailed study 
of major national and international developments in European affairs 
from about 1870 to the present time. Special emphasis is devoted to 
the first World War and new developments in Europe following that 
war and the complex «»f world events which preceded the Second World 
War. 

History 26 — Recent American History (5-0-5). Fall and Winter. 

This course has as its purpose the examination of the most im- 
portant events and movements, political, social and cultural, in Ameri- 
can life from about 1900 to the present time. 

History 111a — An Historical Introduction to Contemporary Civili- 
zation (5-0-5). Fall. Spring, and Summer. 

This course comprises a chronological survey of the main currents 
of political, social, religious and philosophical thought in Western 
Civilization from the period of the sixth century in Greece to the pres- 
ent time. 

History 112y — A Continuation of History lilac (5-0-51. Winter 
and Summer. 

In addition to a chronological treatment of events studied in the 
above courses, the dynamics of Western Civilization are studied in 
works of the following authors: Plato. Lucretius. St. Augustine. Dante. 
Machiavelli. Descartes, Locke. Swift, Rousseau. Adam Smith. Ricardo. 
Malthus. Bentham. Carlvle. Marx. Shaw and Her-r\ . 



Home Economics 

Home Economics 10 — Orientation I 3-0-3 I . Fall 

An introduction to home economics that gives the student some idea 



42 ARMSTRONG COLLEGE OF SAVANNAH 

of tin- vocational opportunities in this field so she will be able to take 
better advantage of her course <>f stud) in college. 

Home Economics \n — Nutrition <in<l Food Preparation (4-2-5). 
Winter. Laboratory fee, $4.00. 

A studs of the laws governing the food requirements of human 
beings for maintenance of growth, activity, reproduction, and lactation. 
Complete meals are prepared and served in each laboratory period. 

Home Economics 11 — Clothing (2-6-5). Fall and Spring. Lab- 
oratory fee. SI. 00. 

Clothing to suit the individual needs of students and the application 
of art principles to dress are studied, together with problems in clothing 
construction in the laboratory periods. 

Home Economics 12 — Foods (3-4-5). Winter. Laboratorv fee, 
$7.00. 

An introduction to the study of basic foods and family meal serv- 
ice. Complete meals are prepared and served in each laboratory period. 

Home Economics 13 — Catering (2-6-5). Spring. Laboratory fee, 
$7.00. Prerequisite: Home Economics 12, or consent of instructor. 

A more advanced approach to food preparation and selection. 
Foods are purchased and prepared for special occasions, such as formal 
dinners, luncheons, receptions and teas. 

Home Economics 21 — Home Furnishings (4-2-5). Fall. Labora- 
tory fee, $2.50. 

A study of the home from the standpoint of family needs. Both the 
interior and the exterior planning of the home are considered with 
reference to such topics as wall treatments, floor coverings, household 
fabrics, art in the home, and lighting. Period styles of furniture from 
those of the ancient times to the present are compared. 

Home Economics 22 — Nutrition (5-0-5). Spring. 

A consideration of the laws governing the food requirements of 
individuals for maintenance and growth of the body. The food nutrients 
and their contributions to the daily dietary are studied. 

Home Economics 23 — Advanced Clothing (2-6-5). Winter. Lab- 
oratory fee, $1.00. Prerequisite: Home Economics 11 or consent of 
instructor. 



( 01 RSI hi SCRIPTIONS 13 



Lectures cover garment selection and wardrobe planning and an 
introduction to the stud) of textiles. Laboratory periods are devoted 
to developing more advanced techniques in clothing construction. 



Mathem ITICS 

Mathematics II. L2 and L3 is a terminal sequence, giving infor- 
mation about the genesis and development of mathematics. 

Mathematics 11 — Basic Mathematics (3-0-3). Fall and Spring. 

\n introduction to inductive and deductive methods: Euclidean 
and non-Euclidean systems: theor) of arithmetic numbers, operations 

and measurements: and logarithms. 

Mathematics 12 — Basic Mathematics (3-0-3). Winter and Summer. 
Prerequisite: Mathematics 11. 

A continuation of the course started in Mathematics 11; variation; 
interest and annuities: progressions of numbers; combinations and 
probability: functional relatioships; and the binomial theorem. 

Mathematics 13 — Basic Mathematics (3-0-3). Spring and Fall. 
Prerequisite: Mathematics 12. 

Advanced circular functions: equations, common curves: and 
statistical concepts are studied. 

Mathematics 16 — College Algebra (5-0-5). Fall and Spring. Pre- 
requisite: Two years of high school algebra and one of plane geome- 
try. 

The course consists of functions and graphs, logarithms, linear and 
quadratic equations, the binomial theorem, complex numbers and the 
elementary theory of equations. 

Mathematics 17 — Trigonometry (5-0-5). Fall and Winter. Prere- 
quisite: Mathematics 16. 

A course covering the solution of the right and general triangle, 
the general solution of trigonometric equations, trigonometric identi- 
ties, polar coordinates. 

Mathematics 18 — Plane Analytic Geometry (5-0-5). Winter and 
Spring. Prerequisite: Mathematics 17. 



44 ARMSTRONG COLLEGE OF SAVANNAH 



Analytic geometry of the point and the line, elemental*) conic sec- 
hen-, polar coordinates, transcendental curves and transformation of 
coordiates. 



Mathematics 10 Mathematics of Finance (3-0-3). Spring. Pre- 
quisite: Mathematics 16. 

This course gives that background necessary for dealing with 
problems found in banking, real estate, financing, and accounting: the 
operation of the compound-interest law in business: simple problems 
concerning bonds, sinking funds, valuation of properties and annuities. 
Practical problems in these fields will be emphasized. The necessary 
aids and shortcuts and use of tables and logarithms will be studied. 



Mathematics 21 — Differential Calculus 1.5-0-51. Fall. Prerequisite: 
Mathematics 18. 

Theory of differentiation, with application to tangents: maxima 
and minima, rates, curvature, velocity and acceleration, approxima- 
tions, and Newton's method. 



Mathematics 22 — Integral Calculus l 5-0-5 i . Winter. Prerequisite: 
Mathematics 21. 

Formulas and methods of integration, single integration applied 
in areas and lengths: volumes and surfaces of revolution; centroids 
and moments of inertia: pressure and work. 

Mathematics 99 — I nter mediate Algebra for College Students 
(5-0-51. Fall and Spring. 

A study of the fundamental operations of algebra together with 
factoring, fractions, linear equations, exponents and radicals, quadratic- 
equations, graphical methods, ratio and proportion, and functional 
notation. 

MUSIC 

I See Fine Arts ) 



Philosophy 

Philosophy 111-112-113 I 2-0-2 I . Fall. Winter and Spring. 
\n informal discussion of the thinking of certain Greek. Roman, 
Farlv Christian. Renaissance, and modern writers. 



( 0] RSE DESCRIPTIONS 45 

Physk m. Edi I \ I ION 
Physical Education 11 Conditioning Course (0-3-1 I. FalL 

Consists of calisthenics, stunts and tumbling, lift> and carries, road 

work, dual combatives, and simple games. 

Physical Education L2 Team Sports (0-3-1). Winter. 
Consists <»f basketball, soccer, speedball and volleyball. 

Physical Education L3 — Elementary Swimming (0-3-1). Spring. 

Physical Education 14 — Officiating oj Basketball jor Women 
(1-3-2). Winter. Prerequisite: P. E. 12 or the equivalent. 

Consists of a study of rules interpretation and actual experience 
in coaching and officiating in class and intramural games. Elective 
credit, except when substituted for P. E. 12. 

Physical Education 20 — First Aid and Safety Education (4-0-3). 
Winter. 

The American Red Cross standard course in first aid is followed 
by a broad consideration of the opportunities for safety teaching in 
the school program. 

Physical Education 21 — Elementary Tennis (0-3-1). Fall. 

Physical Education 22 — Elementary Boxing for Men (0-3-1). 
Winter. 

Physical Education 23 — Senior Life Saving and Instructors^ Course 
in Swimming for Men (2-3-2). Spring. 

Physical Education 24 — Boxing for Teachers (2-3-2). Winter. 

Physical Education 25 — Folk Rhythms (0-3-1). Fall. 

Physical Education 26 — Modern Dance for Women (0-3-1). 
Winter. 

Physical Education 27 — Tap Dance for Beginners (0-3-1). 
Winter." 

Physical Education 28 — Adult Recreative Sports (0-3-1). Spring. 



Id MiMS TRONG COLLEGE OF SAVANNAH 

Consists "I passive, semi-active, and active games and sports which 
have carrj -over value for later life 

Physical Education 29 — Folk Rhythms for Teachers (2-3-21. Fall. 

This course consists of advanced training in folk dances and prac- 
tice teaching of those dances. 

Physical Education 30 — Archery (0-3-1). Spring. 

Physics 

Physics 10 — Physics Survey ( 5-2-6) . Fall. Laboratory fee. $2.50. 
Prerequisite: high school algebra. 

Designed for those students who wish to take one quarter of 
physics. Topics are selected from the major fields of physics, includ- 
ing modern physics and atomic energy, and are presented with sufficient 
intensity to show the logic and methods of physics. Lecture demonstra- 
tion methods, discussion sessions and laboratory work. 

Students interested in agriculture, home economics, pharmacy, 
education etc., are urged to consider this course. 

Physics 11 — General Physics (5-2-6). Winter. Laboratory fee, 
$2. 5(k Prerequisite: a course in college mathematics or consent of the 
instructor. 

Lectures, demonstrations, recitations and laboratory work covering 
the fields of mechanics and heat. 

Physics 12 — General Physics (5-2-6). Spring. Laboratory fee. 
$2.50. Prerequisite: Physics 11 or consent of the instructor. 

Lectures, demonstrations, recitations and laboratory work covering 
the fields of electricity, sound and light. 

Political Science 

Political Science 12 — The Governments of Foreign Powers (5-0-5). 
Summer and W inter. 

A stud) is made of the leading modern political theories, and 
attention is paid to the structure and powers of the major foreign gov- 
ernment-. 

Political Science 13 — Government of the United States (5-0-5). 
Fall and \\ inter. 

A stud\ i» made of the structure, theory, workings of the national 



( 01 RSI DESCRIPTIONS i. 



in tlir I nited States and some of the major problems of 
the state and local government. The course shows In »w developmental 

practice has created oui government as it stands today. 

Psi < B0L0G1 

Psychology \n (5-0-5). 

This course Is an introduction to the study of human behavior 
with emphasis on the underlying principles of mental adjustments. 

The importance of the nurse's own personalis is stressed. 

Psychology 21 — -Introductory Psychology (5-0-5). Fall and Spring. 

In this course human behavior is analyzed into its elementary 
functions of learning, feeling, thinking, maturation, motives and con- 
flicts. Facts and principles from scientific research in psychology are 
used for understanding these functions and for measuring individual 
differences in ability, personality and development. Standardized 
experimets and the students own experiences are used to explore and 
apply the facts in this field. 

Phychology 22 — Social Psychology (5-0-5). Fall and Spring. 

This course provides a study of the interactions between the indi- 
vidual and his social groups. Basic psychological processes of sensory- 
perceptual behavior, motivation, learning and thinking are studied as 
they affect an individual's adjustment to the social groups and institu- 
tions of our culture. Special attention is given to a study of group 
membership, leadership, development of attitudes and values, public 
opinion, propaganda, prejudice and other inter-group tensions. 

Psychology 23 — Child Psychology (5-0-5). Spring. Prerequisite: 
Psychology 21. 

This course offers a study of the developmental factors operating 
in a child's experience which make for, or interfere with, effective 
expression of his capacities and adjustments to life situations. Sources 
are drawn from experimental research and from findings of analytic 
psychology. Direct observation of children individually and in a 
nursery is used as a source for class discussion. 

Psychology 25 — Psychology of Adjustment (5-0-5). Winter. 

The class setting is used in this course for direct experience of 
the use of group discussion for self-understanding. This is supplemented 
by systematic written self-analysis. 



18 VRMSTRONG COLLEGE OF SAVANNAH 



Psychology 125 Psychology of tdjustmeni (5-0-5). Fall and 
\\ inter. 

Emphasis <>n the self and self-analysis. I se is made of free dis- 
cussion and psycho-drama techniques. 



PUBLIC SPEAKING 
(See English 28) 

Sociology 

Sociology In — Elementary Sociology I 5-0-5 I. Fall. 

This course considers (1) the principles of sociology: (2 1 the 
nurse as a citizen of the community and as a professional worker; (3) 
the importance of the hospital among the social agencies in the com- 
munity; (4) the patient in the hospital coming from the family and 
returning to the family. 

Sociology 20 — Introductory Sociology (5-0-5). Fall. 

A study of the principles of social organizations in American cul- 
ture based on scientific studies of groups, "races." population and of 
the institutionalized functions of society. 

Sociology 21 — Marriage and the Family (5-0-5). Winter and 
Spring. 

This course introduces the family as an institution in various 
cultures as a setting for studying the institutional characteristics of the 
modern American family. This is followed by analysis of personality 
development basic to mature marital love, choice of a mate, marital 
adjustment, parenthood, family administration, and sociological trends 
for fmily stability, family disorganization and adjustment of the aging. 



SPANISH 

S e Foreign Languages) 

Social Scie\< i 

Social Science 4 — Contemporary Georgia (5-0-5). Summer. 

A stud) <»f current economic and social statistics as pertaining to 
agriculture, industry, and commerce; population trends, and govern- 
mental organization and problems 



I N I) E \ 

ABook IH 

Admission i«> Class li 



Admission i»> College 



Administration 
Advanced Standing 

Vim- 

Art, Course Description 

Assemblies 1 * 
Associate in Arts 22. 22 

Athletics 1S 

Attendance 19 

Audio-Visual Instruction 13 

Biology. Course Description 28 

Calendar 1952-1953 2 

Certificate, Admission by 9 

Chemistry, Course Description 30 

Chemistry. Concentration in 23 

Clubs 16 

College Commission 3 

Commerce, Course Descriptions 31 

Commerce, Business Administration, Concentration in 22 

Commerce, Secretarial, Concentration in 24 

Core Curriculum 21 

Counseling 11. 21 

Course Load 1~ 

Course Descriptions 28-48 

Dean's List 18 

Degrees, Programs of Study for 22-2 i 

Economics. Course Descriptions 34 

Employment 14, 15 

Engineering, Course Descriptions 34, 35 

Engineering, Freshman 26. 2 i 

English. Course Descriptions 35-37 

Evening College 13 

Examination, Admission by 9 



INDEX 50 



Page 

Facult) 3 

10 

Fine \n~. Course Descriptions 37 

Foreign Languages, Course Descriptions 38-40 

French, Course Descriptions 38 

Glee Club 16 

Grades 18 

Graduation. Requirements for 20 

History of College 7 

History, Course Descriptions 40 

Holidays 2 

Homecoming 14 

Home Economics, Course Descriptions 41-43 

Home Economics, Concentration in 24 

Honors 18 

Index 49 

Intramural Sports 15 

Liberal Arts. Concentration in 25 

Library 12 

Masquers 16 

Mathematics, Course Descriptions 43, 44 

Mental Health Clinic ............. 13 

Music, Course Descriptions 38 

Night School (See Evening College) 13 

Nurses, Program 27 

Open House 14 

Organization of College 7 

Physical Education. Course Descriptions 41.42 

Physical Education, Concentration in 25 

Physical Examination 1< 

Physic-. Course Descriptions 46 

Placemen! Sen ice 15 



51 AKMSTKPV; COLLEGE OF SAVANNAH 

Pi 

Political Science, Course Descriptions 46 

Pre-] Cental, < oncentration in 23 

Pre-Medical, Concentration in 23 

Psychology, Course Descriptions 47,48 

Publications 16 

Public Speaking, Course Descriptions (See English 28t 36 

Recommendations 20 

Refunds 11 

Reports 18 

Requirements for Admission 8 

Scholarships 14 

Secretarial Training 24 

Sociology, Course Descriptions 48 

Spanish. Course Descriptions 39, 40 

Special Students, Admission of 10 

Stenographic Training 27 

Student Activities 15 

Student Assistants 14 

Student Center 15 

Student Conduct 17 

Student Objectives 21 

Summer Session 2 

Testing Program for Freshmen 8 

Transfer Students 9 

Transfer to Other Institutions 21 

USAFI Credit 20 

Veterans, Admission of 10 

Withdrawal 19 



i 



1953-1954 

BULLETIN 




3 18. c 2 - 
V id 



iMfrmbfiwria ^olieae e£SPcw€inn€M 



SAVANNAH, GEORGIA 



For Reference 

Not to be taken from this room 



1953-1954 



SI \l\IKIi FALL WINTKK SI'KINC 



BULLETIN OF 



Armstrong College 
of Savannah 

A City Supported Junior College 




SAVANNAH. GEORGIA 

1 8344 

Membership In 

American Association of Junior Colleges 

Southern Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools 

Association of Georgia Colleges 

Georgia Association of Junior Colleges 

VOLUME XVIII NUMBER 1 



ARMSTRONG COLL£EE 

LIBRARY 



CALENDAR FOR L953 - 1954 



SI MMKI! SESSION EVENING COLLEGE 



First Tkkm 



Second Tkkm 



Registration 

I lasses I » f jz i 1 1 

I B8l daj to register for credit 

Mid-term reports due 

Examination! 

Registration 
Classes begin 

Last day to register for credit 
Mid-term reports due 
Examinations 



FALL QUARTER 
Freshman testing and Sophomore counseling 
Freshman orientation 
Registration 

Classes begin 

Last day to register for credit 

Mid-term reports due 

Thanksgiving Holidays 

Pre-registration 

Examination?- 

Parade and Basketball Game 

Homecoming reception and dance 

Christmas Holidays 



L953 

June L5 

J urn- 16 

June 22 

July 2 

July 23-24 

July 27 

July 28 

August 3 

August 13 

September 3-4 



.September 14 

September 15-19 
^'■ptember 21 
September 22 

October 2 

October 23 

November 26-29 

December 1-3 

December 9-11 
December 12 

December 14 

December 14 - January 4 



WINTER QUARTER 



Registration 

Classes begin 

Last day to register for 
Mid-term reports due. 

Pre-registration 

Examinations 

Spring Solidays 



red it 



January 4 

January 5 

January 18 

February 8 

March 3-5 

March 15-17 

March 18-21 



SPRING QUARTER 

Registration 

Classes begin 

Last day to register for credit 

Mid-term reports due 

Pre-registration. Summer and Fa 

Examinations 

Sophomore Party 

Sophomore-Alumni Luncheon 
Graduation 



March 22 

March 23 

April 2 

April 23 

Quarters May 19-21 

May 31-June 2 

June 4 

June 5 

June 7 



A (I in ioistral ion 

THE COLLKGK COMMISSION 

Herschel V Jenkins Chairman 

Wii.i.ivm Murphei Vice-Chairman 

Willi wi \. EARLY, Ex-officio G. Phillip Morgan, Sk. 

()li\ F. I'i i.MiK. Ex-officio Mrs. William F. Robertson 

J \\n:s I*, lloi i.m w Ex-officio Charles S. Sanford, Ex-officio 

Herbert L. Katton W. Kirk Sutlive, Ex-officio 

Fred Wessels, Jr. 

ADMINISTRATIVE STAFF AND FACULTY 

Foreman M. Hawes, A. B., M. S President 

Arthur M. Gigntlliat, A. B., M. A. Director of the Evening College 

J i LE C. Rossiter, A. A. Secretary and Treasurer 

Anna Cone Seyle, A. B., University of Georgia Registrar 

*W. Orson Beecher, A. B., M. A., Emory University; M. A., University 
of Georgia 

Instructor in History 

William L. Bell, B. S. in Education, Georgia Teachers College; Grad- 
uate Study, George Peabody College for Teachers 
Basketball Coach and Instructor in Physical Education for Men 

**Stephen P. Bond, Bachelor of Science and Architecture, Georgia 
Institute of Technology 

Instructor in Engineering 

Arthur W. Casper, B. S., Beloit College; M. S., University of 
Wisconsin 

Instructor in Mathematics and Physics 

Lamar W. Davis, B. S., M. S., University of South Carolina: Certified 
Public Accountant 

Instructor in Business Administration 

Joseph W. Green, A. B., Birmingham-Southern College; M. A., Vander- 
bilt University; Graduate study toward doctorate, Vanderbilt 
University 

Instructor in English 

*On leave of absence 
** Part-time instructors 



ADMINISTRATION 



"MIarriette A. HAINES, Graduate of the Pape School. Draughon's 
Business College 

Instructor in Typewriting 

Mildred Laird Hamilton, A. L. A.. Armstrong College of Savannah 
Assistant to the Librarian 

Crawford G. Jackson, Jr., B. S., Emorj I niversit) 

Instructor in Biolog ) 

Uno Kask, B. S., University of Georgia; Graduate work at the Uni- 
versity of Washington, Seattle, Washington 
Instructor in Chemistry 

Joseph I. Killorin, A. B., St. Johns College: M. A.. Columbia 
I niversitx 

Instructor in History 

Margaret Spencer Lubs, B. M., Converse College: A. B., University 
of Georgia; M. A., Columbia University 

Instructor in French and English 

Muriel Boyles McCall, A. B., Florida State University: M. A.. Uni- 
versity of Georgia 

Librarian 

Elmo M. McCray, Jr., B. S. and M. S., University of Alabama 
Instructor in Biology 

Helen Hyde McIntire, B. A. and M. A., University of Mississippi 
Instructor in History and Political Science 

Helen Meighen, Taylor's Business College 

Secretary to Director of Evening College 

Dorothy Morris, B. S., University of Tennessee 

Instructor in Physical Education for Women and 
Acting Director of the Physical Education Program 

Marjorie A. Mosley, Associate in Business and Commerce. Armstrong 
College of Savannah 

Secretary to the President 

*Hinckley A. Murphy, B. A., Vanderbilt University: M. A.. Columbia 
I niversit) 

Instructor in English 

*On leave of sbeeni i 
** Part-time instructors 



ADMINISTRATION 



Josephim Simmons Muther, B. S.. Georgia Teachers College; M". S. in 

II. 1. . I niversit) of Georgia 

Instructor in Home Economics 

JACK H. PADGETT, V B.. Woffonl College: M. \.. I ni\ersit\ of North 
Carolina 

Instructor in Mathematics 

I. \\\\\\{\ Pkksse. 15 I'. \ . I ni\ersit\ of Georgia : Master of Music, 
Florida State I niversitj 

Director of the Glee Club 

JACK Porter, A. B.. George Peabody College for Teachers; M. A.. 

I niversit\ of North Carolina 
Instructor in English and Director of the Armstrong College Masquers 

Elizabeth Pound, Georgia State College for Women. State Teachers 
College 

Director of the Student Center 

Anne Lore Stelljes, A. A., Armstrong College of Savannah 
Clerical Assistant in Business Office 

Dorothy M. Thompson, A. M., Monmouth College; M. A., North- 
western University; Certificate of Psychiatric Social Work. 
Western Reserve University 

Instructor in Psychology and Sociology 

*Carmen Torrie, B. S., Concord College; M. S., University of 
Tennessee 
Director of Athletics ami Instructor in Physical Education 

**Anne Wilson, B. M., Wesleyan Conservatory; Graduate Work, Cor- 
nell University 

Director of the Glee Club 

Gladys Nichols Zilch, Diploma from the Gregg School of Chicago 
Instructor in Commerce 

ARMSTRONG EVENING COLLEGE INSTRUCTORS 

John Akins, A. B., Mercer University 

Instructor in Commerce 

Marian Anderson, B. A.. Texas State College for Women; M. A.. 
Columbia University 

Instructor in English 

*0n leave of absence 
** Part-time instructors 



ADMIMSTIiVriON 



Lois BRIGGS, B. A., State I ni\crsit\ of Iowa 

Instructor in Drawing and Painting 

Mary Caterisan, B. S., Georgia State College for Women: M. A. r 
Emory University 

Instructor in Commerce 

David I. Cooley, B. S., Duke Universit\ 

Instructor in Mathematics 

Monique C. Davis, B. A., University of Georgia 

Instructor in Psychology and Sociology 

Vera Dodge, B. A., Denison University; M. A.. Middlebury College 
Instructor in Spanish 

Frank H. Emerick, A. B., University of Notre Dame; L. L. B., Boston 
University 

Instructor in History 

Zoltan J. Farkas, Ph. D., University of Budapest, Hungan 
Instructor in German and French 

Michael J. Gannam, B. A., University of Georgia; M. A.. University 
of North Carolina: L. L. B., University of Georgia 
Instructor in Political Science 

David B. Hilley, B. S., Georgia Institute of Technology 
Instructor in Economics 

Rosa B. Hopson, A. B., Middlebury College; M. A.. University of 

Georgia: Certificate from Sorbonne University 
Instructor in French and English 

Virginia L. Hudson, B. S. Education, Georgia State College for 
Women; M. A., Duke University 

Instructor in History 

Warren R. Jones, B. C. E., Georgia Institute of Technology 

Instructor in Engineering 

Harriet Davis Killorin, A. B., University of North Carolina 
Instructor in Psychology 

Kenneth F. Klinkert, B. S., University of Wisconsin: B. S. W., in 
Psychiatric Social Work. Tulane University 
Instructor in Sociology 

John R. Langford, A. B., M. A.. University of Kentucky 
Instructor in History 



\i>\ii\i>ti: \no\ 



Joseph II. Mendes, Jr., I>. >.. University of Georgia; M. \.. Mem 
\ ><\k I niversit) 

Instructoi in Psychoh 

\\)\ Marvin, \. r>.. Limestone; M. \.. George Peabod) College for 
Teachers 

Instructor in Geography 

Joseph C. Mi ller, l>. B. \.. I niversit) of Georgia 

Instructor in Commerce 

Christopher Murphy, Jr.. Student. Beaux Arts Institute and The Art 
Students' League, New York 

Instructor in Drawing ami Painting 
Margaret A. Mi rimiy. B. A.. I diversity of Georgia: Advanced Study. 
Columbia I niversit) 

Instructor in Ceramics 

Paul Olund, A. B.. Clark University: M. B. A.. I niversit) of Michigan 

Instructor in Economics 
Laura Parker, B. S. in Education, Georgia Teachers College; M. A. in 
Education, University of Georgia 

Instructor in English 
Harold J. Reeves, B. S., Brown University; M. B. A., University of 
Pennsylvania 

Instructor in Business Administration 
Ruth Rich, M. A.. University of Southern California 

Instructor in Speech 
Rose M. RoFFMAN, A. B., University of Georgia; M. A., University of 
Pennsylvania 

Instructor in Political Science 
Marion F. Smith, B. A., University of South Carolina: Advanced 
Study, University of South Carolina 

Instructor in Psychology 

Mary E. Sutton, B. A., University of Georgia 

Instructor in Economics 
Robert J. Swords, B. E.. Wisconsin State Teachers College: L. L. B., 
George Washington University Law School 

Instructor in Speech and Commerce 
Louis A. Thompson, M. B. A., L. L. B., University of Georgia 
Instructor in Commerce and Business Administration 

James W. Tootle, A. B., Emory Universit) 

Instructor in Mathematics 

John Varnedoe, A. B., Oglethorpe University; M. A.. Mercer 
University 

Instructor in Sociology 




HERSCHEL V. JENKINS HALL 




THOMAS GAMBLE HALL 



General Information 

History wi> Organization 

Armstrong College of Savannah was founded on Max 27. L935, 1»\ 
the Mayor and Udermen of the Cit) of Savannah to meet a long-fell 
need for a junior college. The Rrsl college building was the magnificent 
home of the late George F. Armstrong, a gift to the <it\ from his widow 
and his daughter. The former home, now called the Armstrong Building, 
is an imposing structure of Italian Renaissance architecture: inside. 
it> spacious rooms and marble halls lend an air of dignitx : while outside 
it is one of the most beautiful college buildings in the South. 

Over the years, through private donation and public appropriation, 
the campus has been enlarged until now it includes four additional 
buildings: the Lane Building, a gift of the late Mills B. Lane, prominent 
banker: John W. Hunt Memorial Building in which are located the 
Student Center, the Home Economics Program, the Women's Lounge, 
the Dancing Studio, and the Music Room: Herschel V. Jenkins Hall, 
which contains the auditorium, theater for the Armstrong College 
Masquers, and classrooms; and Thomas Gamble Hall, site of science 
lecture rooms and laboratories. 

Three of the buildings face forty-acre Forsyth Park, the most beau- 
tiful park in the city: the other two face Monterey Square, one of the 
carefully planned squares for which Savannah is famous. 

Hodgson Hall, across from Forsyth Park on Whitaker Street, con- 
tains the college library as well as the Library of the Georgia Historical 
Society, to which Armstrong students have access. 

The college is under the control of a commission of six members, 
appointed by the Ma\or. In addition, the commission includes as 
ex-officio members the Mayor, the Chairman of the Chatham Count) 
Board of Education, the Chairman of the Count) Commissioners, the 
Superintendent of the Board of Education, and the President of the 
Savannah Chamber of Commerce. 

Except for the war years, enrollment has shown a steady increase 
until the present student body numbers approximated four hundred. 
As need arises, the curriculum is enlarged and modified to meet new 
demands. 



10 ARMSTRONG COLLEGE OF SAVANNAH 

Aims 

I he college -eels- to serve the community I>\ Jii\ing the men and 
women who attend its classes a better understanding of the world in 
which the) live and the experience of adapting knowledge to meet the 
obligations and responsibilities of citizenship. 

The student max complete one or more of the following 
specific objectives: 

1. Receive additional liberal education to enrich one's 
life: 

2. Complete the freshman and sophomore years of the 

four-year senior college program leading to the bac- 
calaureate degree: 

3. Finish two years of pre-professional work leading to- 
ward medicine, dentistry, law. home economics, the 
ministry and other professions: 

4. Graduate from a semi-professional program, prepared 
to go into business or industry . 

The college awards the degree of Associate in Arts to students 
completing an approved program. 

Admission to the College 

( For dates see calendar on page 2 I 

A student planning to enter Armstrong will obtain from the 
Registrar an "Application for Admission Card." The student will 
complete and return this form to the Registrar's office. REQL EST 
THE HIGH SCHOOL PRINCIPAL. OR THE COLLEGE REGISTRAR 
(in the case of a transfer student). TO SEND A TRANSCRIPT OF 
CREDITS to the Registrar's Office. Armstrong College of Savannah. 
Savannah. Georgia. 

Having checked the student's records for compliance with the 
minimum requirements for admission, the Registrar's office will send 
a notice to the student that he has been admitted to the college, to- 
gether with certain physical examination forms which must be com- 
pleted and returned before the student can complete registration. The 
applicant will be notified of the dates of the freshman placement 
examinations. These tests do not affect a student's entering Armstrong, 
but will enable the faculh advisers to assist him in sclenting a program 
of studv upon entrance. STUDENTS ARE REQUIRED TO TAKE 
THESE TEST ME \Sl IJEMFATS BEFORE REGISTRATION IS COM- 
PLETED. 



GENERAL INFORMATION 11 

REQl l K I \n NTS I «»i; \i)\iis.M()N 

There are two methods of admission to Armstrong College: cither 

l»\ certificate or l>\ examination. 



B1 ( ERTIFICATE 

1. A candidate for admission to Armstrong College of Savannah 

1>\ certificate must be a graduate of an accredited high school with at 
least fifteen units of credit. 

2. No subject-maHer units are prescrihed. The high school pro- 
gram should he of such nature as to give satisfactory preparation for 
beginning college studies. Subjects which may be expected to con- 
tribute to this end are English composition, literature, natural science, 
history and other social studies, foreign languages, and mathematics. 
The right is reserved to reject any applicant whose high school program 
does not indicate adequate preparation for college work. 

3. A record of high school credits earned by the applicant should be 
made out on the proper forms by an official of the high school and 
mailed directly to the Office of the Registrar. This certificate becomes 
the property of the college and cannot be returned to the applicant. 

4. Three units in mathematics are a pre-requisite for admission 
to the freshman class in engineering. 

BY EXAMINATION 

Students beyond high school age, who do not meet the above 
requirements for admission by certificate, may take the General Edu- 
cational Development tests (high school level). The student will be 
admitted to college on the basis of his score. These tests should be 
completed at least one week before registration. Additional informa- 
tion may be secured from the Registrar's office. 

ADMISSION TO ADVANCED STANDING 

Advanced credit will be allowed for work done in other institu- 
tions of proper rank and standing and in certain cases for training 
received in the Armed Services. Credit toward graduation from 
transfer institutions will be accepted if the student has a general average 
of "C" for all college work completed. To receive a diploma from 
Armstrong College of Savannah, a student must be in attendance 
taking a normal study load for two quarters, earn a "C" average and, 
in addition, must satisfy the requirements of a particular course of 
study. Adults (students over 21 years of age) may receive credit 
for certain college work on the basis of the General Educational De- 
velopment tests (college level). 






12 ARMSTRONG COLLEGE OF SAVANNAH 



ADMISSION <>| VETERANS 

Armstrong College of Savannah will aocepl veterans who are not 
high school graduates if their official General Educational Development 
tests show BCOres thai indicate the applicants ahility to do college 
\\<nk. A Certificate of Eligibility and Entitlement l VA Form No. 
7-1993) is required of ever) veteran who attends this institution under 
Public Law 550 (Korean Bill), application for which ma\ be completed 
at the Veterans Administration office in the Blun Building, Savannah. 
Georgia. Immediately upon receipt of certificate from the Veterans 
Administration, the student should contact the college business office 
regarding processing of certificate and future nionthK reports. 

All veterans attending Armstrong under Public Law 346 must 
present a certificate of eligibility the first time the) register at Ann- 
strong College. A veteran who has not obtained a certificate of 
eligibility prior to registration will be required to pay cash, which ma\ 
be refunded by the Business Office upon receipt of the certificate. All 
veterans attending Armstrong under Public Law 550 should be pre- 
pared to pay tuition and fees at time of registration. 



ADMISSION OF SPECIAL STUDENTS 

Adults who are interested in enrolling in courses for their intrinsic 
value but who do not wish transfer credit may be enrolled as special 
students. Requirements pertaining to entrance examinations, physical 
examinations, and physical education do not apply to these students. 



TRANSIENT STUDENTS 

A student regularly enrolled in another college with the permission 
of his dean or adviser may register locally as a transient student. For 
such a student, entrance requirements are waived. A transcript record 
of his work here will be transferred to his mother institution upon 
completion of the term at the request of the student. 



Fees 
Tuition will be charged as follows: 

For 12-17 quarter hours — $55.00. 

For each quarter hour less than 12 quarter hours — $4.60. 

For each quarter hour in excess of 11 quarter hours — $4.60. 

Anyone wishing to audit a non-laboratory course in the day pro- 
gram (but not receive college credit ) may do so with permission of the 
instructor by paying a fee of $10.00 per course. 



<;i.\IK\l. IMOKMMION 



L3 



\ graduation fee * » f $7.50 will be collected from each candidate f<>i 
graduation. 

\n\ Btudenl delinquent in the payment <>f ani fee < 1 1 1 < - the college 

will have grade reports and transcripts of records held up. and will 
not be allowed to re-register at the College for a new quarter until the 
delinquency has been removed. 

Each student leaving \rmstrpng College is entitled to one official 

transcript of his college work. The charge for additional copies is 
$1.00 each. 

An activit) fee of $5.00 each quarter will he charged all da\ 
students who are registered for 10 quarter hours or more. This fee 
is not charged Evening College students unless they wish to participate 
in the regular activity program of the college. 

Students taking laboratory work will be required to pay a fee for 
materials and equipment. This fee is indicated in the description of 
courses found under "Course Descriptions" elsewhere in this bulletin. 

Any student who desires to take more than 18 quarter hours per 
quarter must have the approval of his adviser. 

Refunds of fees and tuition will be made ONLY upon written 
application for withdrawal from school. No refunds will be made to 
students dropping a course. The schedule of refunds is given below: 



First Session 

Summer Quarter. 



1953 



Second Session 

Summer Quarter, 1953 



Fall Quarter, 1953 



Winter Quarter, 1954 



Spring Quarter, 1954 



REFUND SCHEDULE 

Withdrawal Dates 
June 15, 16, 17 
June 18. 19. 20 
June 22, 23, 24 
June 25, 26, 27 

July 27, 28, 29 
July 30, 31 
August 1 
August 3. 4. 5 
August 6, 7, 8 

Sept. 21, 22, 23, 24 

25, 26 
Sept. 28, 29, 30 
Oct. 1, 2, 3 
Oct. 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10 
Oct. 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17 

Jan. 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9 
Jan. 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16 
Jan. 18, 19, 20, 21, 22. 23 
Jan. 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30 

Mar. 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27 

Mar. 29, 30, 31 

Apr. 1, 2, 3 

Apr. 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10 

Apr. 12. 13. 14. 15, 16. 17 



Amount of Refunds 
80% of fees paid 
60% of fees paid 
40% of fees paid 
20% of fees paid 

807o of fees paid 
60% of fees paid 
60% of fees paid 
40% of fees paid 
207c of fees paid 

80% of fees paid 
80% of- fees paid 
60% of fees paid 
60% of fees paid 
40% of fees paid 
20% of fees paid 

80% of fees paid 

60% of fees paid 

40% of fees paid 

20% of fees paid 

807o of fees paid 
60% of fees paid 
60% of fees paid 
40% of fees paid 
20% of fees paid 



14 ARMSTRONG COLLEGE OF SAVANNAH 

Orientation and Advisement 

The counseling and advisement service of Armstrong College of 
Savannah offers help in solving problems connected with the student's 
college program. 

Students are urged to request help from their instructors when the 
difficulty is one concerned with the suhject itself and having no compli- 
cations. The areas with which the adviser is usualK concerned are 
choice of vocation, the planning of work in college, study habits 
generally and personal adjustment to college life. Those problems 
which do not fit into these general categories either because of greater 
intensity or critical development are referable to community agencies 
outside the college if this is agreeable to the student and his parents 
or guardians. 

During the year 1952-53 the academic advisement of students 
was distributed among the entire faculty so that each instructor carried 
the responsibility for a proportionate number of the entire student 
body registered in the daytime program. Advisement interviews were 
scheduled with each student at least once a quarter and appointments 
for these interviews were mailed from the office of the President. These 
interviews were designed to aid the student in planning his program of 
work in college. In addition to the advisement program, a program 
of college orientation was set up for freshman students beginning dur- 
ing Freshman Week and continuing throughout the year. L nder this 
program the freshman class was divided into groups of from fifteen to 
twenty students to meet at 1:30 each Thursday throughout the year. 
Attendance was strongly urged and one quarter hour's credit was 
granted for the completion of the full year. During the year a similar 
program for Sophomores was instituted. 

Library 

Hodgson Hall houses not only the library of Armstrong College, 
but also that of the Georgia Historical Society. Since all books are 
on open shelves, students have immediate access to both collections. 
The reference room, with its many volumes of factual information, 
provides an excellent atmosphere for quiet concentration. The down 
stairs reading room, a popular and attractive meeting place for the 
students, contains fiction, biography, and books in foreign languages, 
as well as magazines and newspapers. In addition, the reading room 
houses a radio-phonograph, on which the students may hear their 
favorite records. Opening off this room is a large garden equipped 
with outdoor furniture, a pleasant place to study or relax. 

The library's holdings consist of a good collection of standard 
reference books and fiction totaling nearh 12.000 volumes. There are 



<.l NERAL INFORMATION L5 



more than LOO periodical subscriptions, including five newspapers, four 

of which arc dailies. Other rooiirco of the lihrar\ include the music 

collection of approximately L50 record albums and a neu group of 
outstanding art prints. 

In keeping with the needs of college students. Armstrong students 
are encouraged to use not onl) the college lihrar\. hut also the Savannah 
Public Library, which has much material of interest, such as its large 
collection of fiction, government documents, and microfilm copies of 
newspapers. The main building is located on Bull Street, where a 
union catalog, listing the holdings of the Downtown Branch, the Waters 
Avenue Branch, and the Georgia Historical Society, is found. 

Mental Health Clinic 

The clinic is an integral part of the Savannah-Chatham Health 
Department, which has as its primary functions the development of a 
community-wide mental health program and the treatment of the 
emotional problems of children and adults. 

The personnel at the clinic include the Director, who is a 
psychiatric social worker, another psychiatric social worker, and a 
psychologist, as well as a psychiatrist who serves as consultant. 

The clinic is located on the ground floor in the Lane Building 
at 20 West Gaston Street. 

ARMSTRONG EVENING COLLEGE 

Education knows no age limit. 

For those adults who wish to keep mentally alert; for those who 
are employed by day so must attend college by night; for those who 
wish to obtain a college degree in the evenings; for those who strive 
to master a skill or an art, to add a new field of interest in life; for 
any and all of these, Armstrong keeps its doors open well into the night. 

College credit is given for courses taught in the evening. Students 
may become candidates for the degrees listed elsewhere in this bulletin 
under "Curriculums." 

Students not seeking degrees may enroll in courses on a non- 
credit basis. 

Physical examinations and placement tests are waived as require- 
ments for registration. Physical education is not a degree requirement 
for adults in the evening college. 

It is possible to enroll for three courses on Monday, Wednesday 
and Friday between the hours of 5:30 and 10:00 P. M. However, 



16 UUISTKONC CO LLEGE OF SAVANNAH 

BtlldentS employed during tin- da\ arc urged to limit their enrollment 
to one or two courses. Eighteen 5-hour courses or the equivalent, are 
required for graduation. 

The dates for refunds in the case of withdrawal listed in this 
bulletin are applicable. When a student is enrolled in more than one 
course, no refund is allowed for dropping a single course. Refunds 
are made onlv in case of withdrawal from the college. 

The cost of tuition, etc., is covered under "fees." Student activit) 
fees are not assessed evening college student-. Participation in college 
activities is invited. 

Armstrong Evening College as successor to the Savannah branch 
of the University of Georgia Off-Campus Center, began operation in 
June, 1951. Since that time more than 250 students have enrolled each 
quarter. Veterans are now attending under Public Laws 346 (World 
War II) and 550 ("Korean" veterans). 

Qualified Armed Services personnel, currently on active dutv . 
are attending with their tuition largely defrayed by the military. This 
is handled by the unit education officer of the service affected. 

Quarterly announcements of Evening College courses, instructors, 
etc., may be obtained by addressing requests to The Director, Arm- 
strong Evening College, 447 Bull Street. Savannah. Georgia. 



Audio-Visual Instruction 

Certain classrooms of the college are equipped with screens for 
the showing of films, which are used by all of the departments. In the 
teaching of English, public speaking, foreign languages and music, 
visual aids are supplemented by recordings. 



Homecoming and Open Hoi si 

Each year during the first part of December there is a Home- 
coming program for all alumni and students. This includes a parade, 
a reception, an intercollegiate basketball game and a dance. All alumni. 
students and their friends are invited to attend. 

During the Spring quarter the college is open to the general public 
for inspection during its annual Open House. Exhibits are prepared 
by the students and facultv members in the various classes which are 
representative of the work done at Armstrong. All visitors are invited 
to tour the buildings and grounds and to attend a social hour arranged 
by the home economics students. 



GENER \l. INFORM \TI<>\ 17 



Sti i>i n i Assistants 

Hie college employs a number <»f student assistants each year, 
rhese students work in the library, science laboratories, business offices 
and with the faculty. Those ulm desire Buch employmenl Bhould apph 

to the staff member who is in charge <>f the work in which lie is in- 
terested or i" the President of the college. 



S( HOI UtSHIPS 

The scholarships which are available to students are listed below. 
Application blanks ma\ be secured from the President's office in the 
Armstrong Building. Those who wish to apply for scholarship- for 
the school year beginning in September should file an application in 
the President - office not later than July 15. All applicants are re- 
quired to appear before an oral interview board during the month of 
August. Each applicant will be notified when to appear for this inter- 
\ iew. 

Commission Scholarship- 8 for $100.00 each 

(This is a work scholarship) 

\ithur Lucas Scholarships 5 for $100.00 each 

Junior Chamber of Commerce 2 for $100.00 each 

American Business Club 2 for $200.00 for 2 year- 
John Helm Maclean Memorial Scholarship 1 for $100.00 

Edward McGuire Gordon Scholarship 1 for $200.00 (Men onl> I 

Sa\annah Gas Co. Engineering 1 for $100.00 (Men only) 

Sa\annah Gas Co. Home Economics 2 for $100.00 each 

Friedman's Jewelers Scholarships 10 for $100.00 each 

Loyal Order of Moose 2 for $180.00 each 



Placement Service 

The college maintains a placement service for the benefit of em- 
ployers and students. Anyone seeking part-time employment while in 
college, or full-time employment after leaving college, should place his 
name on file with the Business Office. 



Commencement Exercisi s 

Commencement exercises are held each year in June. At this 
time the degree of Associate in Arts is awarded to those students who 
have met the requirements for graduation. At this time recognition 
is given to those students who qualify for scholastic honors. The 
Faculty and Graduates participate in full academic dress. 



18 ARMSTRONG COLLEGE OF SAVANNAH 

Student Center 

The college does nol operate a boarding department. The Student 
Center in the Hunt Building is open throughout the day and provides 
light lunches at reasonable prices. The Center also provides recreational 
facilities and houses the Book Store. 



Student Activities 

The entire program of student activities at the college is designed 
to contribute to the development of the whole individual and to assist 
him in becoming an active and helpful member of the community. The 
college feels that students should take the responsibility for directing their 
own affairs. The senate is the governing student board of Armstrong 
College. This organization is made up of elected representatives of all 
student groups. It is the function of the Senate to coordinate, direct 
and control student organizations and activities at Armstrong. 



Athletics 

Basketball is the only sport in which the college fields an inter- 
collegiate team. All other sports at the college are on an intramural 
basis. 



Physical Education Program 

The college requires all students to participate in a physical educa- 
tion program. The program includes intramural competition in several 
sports. Various activities, are available such as swimming, softball, 
archery, tap dancing, modern dancing and tumbling. 



Publications 

The college publishes the Inkwell, a newspaper: the Mercury, a 
magazine; and the 'Geechee, a yearbook. These afford students an 
opportunity to express their opinions on a wide variety of topics, to 
do creative writing and gain practice in other journalistic activities. 



The Armstrong College Masquers 

The Armstrong College Masquers, with a charter membership of 
over seventv students, was organized in the Fall of 1950, after the 
Savannah Plavhouse separated from Armstrong College and was reor- 
ganized as The Little Theatre. Inc. 



(.1 \l R \l. INFORM \TI<>\ 19 



Tin* Masquer organization's goal ia i<> furnish enjoyment and 
appreciation of the drama For l><» h participants and spectators through 
a balanced presentation <>l popular and classic theatre. 

Masquer membership is open to all students interested in an) phase 
of the theatre: acting, designing, lighting, make-up, costuming, and 
other production skills. 

\n affiliate «>f the Masquers i- the Armstrong Radio Workshop, 
formed to offer interested students an opportunity t<> develop techniques 
of radio broadcasting. 



Glee Club 

The Armstrong Glee Club was organized in September, 1949. Its 
members are drawn from the student body and faculty. Besides giving 
two complete concerts at the college, one at Christmas and one in the 
Spring, the group has sung for main civic clubs in Savannah. 

Rehearsals of one hour duration are held three times a week. 
Membership is open to all interested students. 



I* 









- 



< 



1 = 



z 






V* 



f - *•>, 



,v. dM 



Genera] Regulations 

Advisement ind Placement Tests 

To help a student selecl a definite objective earl) in hi> college 
program, the Armstrong Btaff administers to cadi entering freshman 
a series oi interest, aptitude, and achievement tests. In the Fall, these 
arc given during Kreshman Week and are scored prior to tin- Btudent's 
interview with an adviser. On the basis of these objective measure 
ments, the student's previous record, his interesl and his famil) counsel, 
the student with the aid of his adviser decides on a program of stud) 
which will enable him to accomplish his purpose. 



PinSIC \L I'AWIIN VTIO.NS 

Each da) school student must submit a completed physical exami- 
nation report on the forms furnished by the college before he can 
complete his registration. A chest X-ray is also required. On the 
basis of the examinations, the physical education director will adapt 
a program of training and recreation to individual requirements. This 
regulation is not applicable to students enrolled in the Evening College. 



Course Load 

The unit of work for a regular student is 16-17 quarter hours per 
quarter. A normal schedule of sixteen quarter hours presupposes that 
the average student will devote approximately forty-eight hours per 
week to his college classes and to his preparation therefor. 

Except in engineering, permission to enroll for more than 17 
quarter hours will be granted only to students who have a "B" average 
for the preceding quarter. The quarter just prior to graduation, a 
student may take an extra course which is necessary to meet require- 
ments for graduation. No student will be allowed to register for more 
than 21 hours in any one quarter. 

Admission to Class 

Students will be admitted to class when the instructor is furnished 
an official class card indicating that he has completed his registration 
and paid his fees in the Business Office. 

Conduct 

Compliance with the regulations of the faculty and the Armstrong 
College Commission is assumed. The use on the campus of intoxi- 
cating beverages, gambling, and hazing are prohibited. 



22 ARMSTRONG COLLEGE OF SA\ \\\ Ml 



REPORTS \M) ( rB U>ES 

li is fell l>\ Armstrong thai students in college should be held 
accountable for their own scholarship. Accordingly, report card-. 
framings <»f deficient scholarship and other such notice- are not Benl out 
to parents or guardians b) the college except on request In-trad the 

students themselves receive these reports and are expected to contact 
their advisers whenever their work is unsatisfactory. Report cards 
are issued at the end of each quarter, lit port- of failing grades are 
issued in the middle of each quarter. Each student has access to an 

adviser and in addition, the Registrar, and all instructors are available 
to help and advise an\ student seeking assistance. 

Reports are based on the following -\stem of grading: 

4 honor points per quarter hour 
3 honor points per quarter hour 
2 honor points per quarter hour 
1 honor point per quarter hour 
No honor points per quarter hour 
Incomplete must be removed before 

mid-term of the following quarter 
Course must be repeated 
Course must be repeated 
Course must be repeated 

\ student who receives an "E" (incomplete grade I should con- 
sult his instructor at once and arrange to complete the requirements of 
the course. An "E" grade which has not been removed by the middle of 
the succeeding quarter automatically becomes an "F." An "E" grade 
becomes an "F" if the course is repeated. 

Honors 

Students who have been in attendance for three consecutive quar- 
ters taking a normal load and achieving an average grade of *"B V or 
better with no grade below that of "C will be placed on the Permanent 
Dean's List. This list is published each June in the commencement 
program. 

Graduates who meet the requirements for the Permanent Deans 
List and who are graduating with an average of three honor points 
per quarter hour, will be designated as graduating summa cum laude 
(with highest distinction). The designation cum laude I with distinc- 
tion) will be bestowed upon those meeting the above requirements 
with an average of two honor points per quarter hour. 

\ valedictorian will be selected by the graduating class from the 
five students with the highest scholastic averages in the work completed 



A plus 


Exceptional 


A 


Excellent 


B 


Good 


C 


Fair 


D 


Poor 


E 


Incomplete 


F 


Failure 


W 


Withdrew 


W/F 


Withdrew Failing 



GENERAL REG! LATIONS 



before the term in which the Btudents graduate. 



Students Hrho make a grade of "B" or better in each course (luring 

am quarter will be placed on the Deans Scholastic Attainment List 

\ I I I M>\\< I 

Students are expected to attend classes as scheduled. Any absence, 
whatsoever, from class work entail> a loss to the student. 

\ student who has been absent from class for a valid reason should 
have the absence excused with a written statement to his instructor 
who will initial it. The student will then file this form in the 
Registrar's office. Excuses must be submitted within seven days from 
the date the student returns to school; otherwise the absence will not 
be excused. 

A student who has unexcused absences equal in number to the times 
the class meets in one week, and has one additional unexcused absence, 
will be dropped from class. The instructors will notify the Registrar's 
office when a student should be dropped. The Registrar's office will 
notify the student. Grades asigned to those who have been dropped 
will either be W or W F, depending on the status of the student at the 
time he is dropped from class. 

Attendance at bi-weekly assemblies is required. 

Withdrawals 
A formal withdrawal, presented to the President in writing, is a 
pre-requisite for honorable dismissal from, or re-entrance into, this 
institution. Any student planning to withdraw should immediately 
make such intentions known to the administration of the college in 
writing. This notice is required to receive any authorized refunds. 

In order that a student may not receive a failing grade on his 
permanent record card in the Registrar's office, he should formally with- 
draw from any class which he discontinues by securing the instructor's 
written approval. This written approval should be filed in the Regis- 
trar's office. 

Requirements For Graduation 

The requirements for graduation from Armstrong College of 
Savannah are listed below: 

1. The student will complete a program of studv listed under 
"CURRICULUMS" with an average grade of "C." 

2. One-third of the work required for graduation will be 
completed at Armstrong College of Savannah. 






24 ARMSTRONG COLLEGE OF SAVANNAH 

3. Not more than one-fourth of the total work required 
for graduation will consist of correspondence course credit 
and credit for Armed Services Experience. 

Candidates for graduation will make application in the Registrar's 
office two quarters prior to the expected date of graduation. 

Recommendations 

The recommendations issued by the college are based on the 
grades the student earns, his student activity record, and the opinions 
expressed by his instructors on a special student rating form. 

The files of the Registrar's office which include all permanent 
records are consulted regularly by representatives of the Federal 
Bureau of Investigation, the Civil Service, the local Credit Bureau 
and other agencies having access to confidential records. A good 
college record is of vital importance to a student. 



Curricu In ms 



General 

Before registration, the student should PLAN A PROGRAM 01 
STUDY WITH AN ADVISER. Even if a student knows what courses 

arc required for graduation, lie should have on record in the office of 
his adviser a cop) of his program. In order for a student to makr an) 
changes in his planned program he must consult his adviser. The 
adviser and the Registrar will check a student's program and it will be 
approved two quarters prior to the expected date of graduation. 

The Associate of Arts degree is conferred upon all students who 
complete at Armstrong College of Savannah one of the programs out- 
lined in the catalog. 

If a student plans to transfer to another institution either before 
or after graduation it is essential that he determine what courses must 
be completed at Armstrong in order to conform with the degree re- 
quirements of the institution to which he wishes to transfer. 



The Core Curriculum 

There are certain bodies of knowledge and certain skills indispen- 
sable to every college trained man and woman. The understanding of 
one's environment and man's struggle to adapt it to useful ends, the 
ability to communicate his thoughts and feelings; right group-attitudes 
and coordinated physical activity — these objectives are set up in the 
following courses required of all students desiring to graduate. 

Freshman year: English 11-12-13; History 11-12-13; ten quarter 
hours of a laboratory science, and Physical Education 11-12-13. 

Sophomore year: Sophomore English and three quarters of 
physical education. Students enrolled in certain terminal courses 
described below mav substitute English 20 and English 28 for English 
21x and 22y. 

Students graduating in less than the six quarters of the regular 
session may reduce their physical education requirements accordinglv. 
Physical education should be taken in the proper sequence and two 
courses should not be scheduled in any one quarter. 



26 



ARMSTRONG COLLEGE OF SAVANNAH 



cov entration 

Business Administration : 



\SSOCI \T IN ARTS DEGREE 

Senior College Preparatory 



First Yeah 
English 11, 12. 13 Freshman English 9 
Historj 11. 12. 13 Western 

Civilization 9 

Physical Education 11. 12, 13 3 

Laboratory Science 10 

Mathematics 16 — College Algebra 5 

Mathematics 19 — Finance 3 

Electives 9 



TOTAL 



18 



Second "i EAB 
English 21x. 22\ Sophomore 

English ' 10 

Physical Education 3 

Commerce 24. 25— Accounting 10 

Economics 21, 24- — Principles and 

Problems 10 

Political Science 13 — Govt, of U. S. 5 
Electives 10 

TOTAL 43 



* A student should consult the catalog of his prospective senior college for 
required subjects. Colleges differ as to what subjects are required for this 
course. 



Concentration — Business Administration 



Terminal 



Many students will not continue their formal education after 
leaving Armstrong. To these students the college gives the opportunity 
to select those subjects which have a vocational value. Sufficient 
general education is included in the core curriculum to make this a 
well-rounded program. 



First Year 
English 11. 12, 13— Freshman 

English 9 

History 11, 12, 13— Western 

Civilization 9 

Physical Education 11, 12, 13 3 

Laboratory Science 10 

Economics 21, 24 — Principles 

and Problems 10 

Electives 7 



TOTAL 48 



Second Year 
English 21x. 22v — Sophomore English 

or English 20. 28 10 

Physical Education 3 

Commerce 24. 25 — Accounting . . 10 

Commerce 27 — Business Law 5 

Commerce Electives : 10 

Typing 

Calculator & Comptometer 

Shorthand 

Commerce 26 — Intermediate Acct. 

Commerce 28 — Business Law 
Electives ( other) 10 



TOTAL 



18 



Concentration — Science 



Senior College Preparatory 



This course of studv is designed for those students who wish to 
major in the fields of Biology. Chemistry. Physics or Mathematics. At 
the time of registration the student must specify his major field, and 
it will be indicated at the time of graduation on the permanent record 
cards. The major of Biology will include the fields of Pre-Medicine, 
Pre-Dentistry. Pre-Pharmacy and Medical Technology.* 



CI RRIC1 LA 



I' 



Thifl program is so constructed 

necessan to prepare a student for 
responsibility of each student to see 
to his senior college requirements. 

is required for graduation. 

First Year 
English 11, 12, 13— Freshman 

English 9 

History 11, 12, 13— Western 

Civilization 9 

Physical Education 11. 12, 13 .... 3 
Mathematics 16 — College Algebra 5 

Mathematics 17 — Trigonometry 5 

Electives & Major Requirements. . . . 



thai <>nl\ slight variations are 

lis particular major and it i^ the 

Kit his program of stud) conforms 
A minimum of ')(> quarter hours 



Si ( OND "> i \ii 

Ei glish 21 x, 22y — Sophomore 

English 10 

Physical Education 3 

•Physics 11. 12— General 12 

'French or German 10 

Electives & Major Requirements . . . 



The above courses are required of all students (except as noted 
enrolling in this concentration. 

MAJOR REQUIREMENTS: 



Major in Biology: 

Biology 14, 15 — General Zoology 
Biology 23 — Comparative Vertebrate 

Anatomy 
Chemistry 14, 15 — General 
Chemistry 24— Qualitative Analysis 
Chemistry 25 — Quantitative Analysis 
Major in Mathematics: 

Mathematics 18 — Plane Analytic 

Geometry 

Chemistry or Biology (10 hrs. 

minimum) 



Major in Chemistry: 

Chemistry 14, 15— General Chemistry 
Chemistry 24 — Qualitative Analysis 
Chemistry 25 — Quantitative Analysis 
Mathematics 18 — Plane Analytic 

Geometry 
Major in Physics: 

Mathematics 18 — Plane Analytic 

Geometry 
Chemistry or Biology (10 hrs. 

minimum) 



*Students pursuing a terminal course in Medical Technology may substitute 
in certain cases, courses recommended by the American Society of Clinical 
Pathologists. 



Concentration — Commerce Secretarial 



Terminal 



This program is designed to meet the needs of those students who 
wish to qualify for clerical positions in business. 

Second Year 

Commerce 24 — Accounting 5 

* English 20 — Composition 5 

Commerce 17 — Office Practice 5 

Commerce 21a-b c — Typing 6 

Commerce 22 a-b-c — Shorthand 15 

* English 28— Public Speaking 5 

Physical Education 3 



First Year 
English 11, 12, 13— Freshman 

English 9 

History 11, 12, 13— Western 

Civilization 9 

Physical Education 11, 12, 13 3 

Laboratory Science 10 

Commerce 11 a-b c — Typing 6 

Commerce 12 a b c — Shorthand .15 

TOTAL 52 



TOTAL 44 



English 21x, 22y may be substituted for these English courses. 



28 



ARMSTRONG COLLEGE OF SAVANNAH 



Concentration — Home Economics Senior College Preparatory 



First "> ear 

English 11. 12. 13 Freshman English 9 

Hi>tor> 11. 12. 13 Wrstern 

< livilization 9 

Physical Education 11, 12, 13 3 

Home Economics 10a — Orientation: 

Careers 3 

Home Economics 101) — Orientation: 

Personal Development 3 

Home Economics 11 — Clothing 5 

Art 11 — Creative 5 

Laboratory Science 10 



TOTAL 47 



5» OND \ i \i; 
English 21x. 22> Sophomore English 10 

Physical Education 3 

Home Economics 12 — Familj Meal 

Planning and Serving •"> 

Home Economics 21 — Home Planning 

and Decorating 5 
Home Economics 24 — FamiK 

Fundamentals 5 

Social Studies , 10 

Science Electives 6 

Mathematics 10 or 16 5 

TOTAL 49 



Concentration — Home Economics 



Terminal 



This course is designed to meet the needs of those women who plan 
to complete their college work at Armstrong. Sufficient electives are 
allowed to enable the student to select commerce subjects which have 
a vocational value or cultural subjects for worthy use of leisure time. 



First Yeah 

English 11. 12. 13— Freshman English 9 
History 11. 12. 13— Western 

Civilization 9 

Physical Education 3 

Lahoratory Science 10 

( Human Biology included) 
Home Economics 10b — Orientation: 

Personal Development 3 

Home Economics 11 — Clothing t 

Psychology 21 — Introductory 5 

Elective 4 



Second Year 

English 21x. 22y — Sophomore English 10 

Physical Education 3 

Home Economics 21 — Home Planning 

and Decorating 5 

Home Economics 24 — Family 

Fundamentals 5 

Home Economics 12 — Family Meal 

Planning and Serving 5 

Electives 20 



TOTAL 



18 



TOTAL 



\H 



Concentration — Physical Edi cation Senior College Preparatory 



The Physical Education Department is qualified to provide the 
first two years of preparation for a major in the field of health and 
physical education for those students planning to enter the field of 
education or supervised recreation. 



(I RRIC1 L\ 



2g 



First Year 

English 11. 12. 13 Freshman English 9 

H.~i. .in li, 12. 13 Western 

Civilization 9 

Physical Education 11. 12. 13 3 

•♦Mathematics 10 

•• Mathematics 16 College Algebra 
•♦Mathematics 17 — Trigonometry. .10 

Physics <>i Chemistry 12 

Homo Economics In — Nutrition 4 

Electives 3 



Si « ond \ i \i; 

English 21 x, 22} Sophomore English 10 

Physical Education 'i 

\iiaiom\ and Physiology 

In. 2n, 3n ( > 

Physical Education 2-\ Senior 

Life Saving & Swimming for Men 2 
; Physical Education 24- Boxing 

l<n Teachers 2 

Ps} cholog) 21 Introductory . 5 
Psychology 23 Child .5 
Sociology 21 Marriage and 

the Family 5 

Electives 5 



TOTAL 50 



TOTAL 



If. 



•Women will take Physical Education 29 and Physical Education 14. 
**The student may take either Mathematics 10 and Mathematics 16 or 
Mathematics 16 and Mathematics 17. 



Concentration — Liberal Arts 



Senior College Preparatory 



This program is recommended for candidates for an A. B. degree, 
pre-education, pre-law, pre-ministerial. journalism, and other pre- 
professional concentrations. 



First Year 

English 11, 12, 13— Freshman English 9 
History 11, 12, 13— Western 

Civilization 9 

Physical Education 11, 12, 13 3 

Laboratory Science 10 

Mathematics 16 — College Algebra. . . 5 

Mathematics 17 — Trigonometry 5 

* Foreign Language 10 



Second Year 

English 21 x, 22y — Sophomore English 10 

Physical Education 3 

Two of the following courses: 10 

History 25 — Recent European 
Political Science 13 — Gov't of U. S. 
Psychology 21 — Introductory 
Sociology 20 — Introductory 
Economics 21 — Principles 

* Science 10 

Electives 12 



TOTAL 51 



TOTAL 45 



A student applying for admission to a senior college which does not require 
the amount indicated of this subject may, with the approval of his adviser, sub- 
stitute other courses required by the senior institution during his first two 
years. 



Concentration — Liberal Arts 



Terminal 



A student in the Liberal Arts, Terminal program may select the 
remainder of his electives from courses offered by the college in order 
to prepare for a vocation or to pursue a special interest. 



30 ARMSTRONG COLLEGE OF SAVANNAH 

First Year Second Year 

English 11, 12. 13 I i<-hman English 9 English 21x 22y — Sophomore English 10 

Hi-tor\ 11. 12. 13— Western Physical Education 3 

Civilization 9 *Electives 35 

Physical Education 11, 12, 13 3 

Natural Science 10 

Mathematics 10 or 16 5 

*Electives 12 

TOTAL 48 TOTAL 48 

*A student must elect 20 hours from at least three of the following de- 
partments: Foreign Language, Political Science, Economics, Fine Arts, Home 
Economics, Psychology, Sociology. 

One Year Programs 
Concentration — Engineering Senior College Preparatory 

This program will satisfy degree requirements for the first year 
of most types of engineering but should be varied for certain degrees 
such as chemical, electrical, etc. The student should obtain a catalog 
from the senior college he plans to attend and check this program 
against the requirements. The courses required for the freshman year 
have been worked out in consultation with the Georgia Institute of 
Technology. 

Chemistry 14, 15 — General 12 

English 11, 12, 13 — Freshman 9 

Engineering 11, 12 — Drawing 6 

Engineering 19 — Descriptive Geometry 3 

History 11, 12, 13 — Western Civilization (or Modern Language) 9 

Mathematics 16, 17, 18 — College Algebra, Trigonometry and Analytic 

Geometry 15 

Physical Education 11, 12, 13 3 

TOTAL 57 

Concentration — Stenographic 

A student who has only a year to spend in college may herein 
master some of the tools that will enable him to earn a livelihood. 

Commerce 11a b c Typing 6 

Commerce 12a-b-c Shorthand 15 

Commerce 17 — Office Practice 5 

Commerce 24 — Accounting 5 

English 20 — Composition 5 

English 28 — Public Speaking 5 

Physical Education 11, 12. 13 3 

Electives 5 

TOTAL 49 



CI RRIC1 l.\ 31 



( <»\( i \ i k v HON \l RSING 

Armstrong College offers the following courses in cooperation with 

the Warren \. Candler School of Nursing. Willi the permission of the 
instructor and the approval oi the student - adviser, a student no! en 
rolled in the School of Nursing ma\ lake an\ of tin' following courses: 

\naii'in\ and Physiology In. 2n, 3n 9 

Chemistry In 5 

Sociology In .5 

l'h\ sical Education In 1 

Bacteriology In. 2n 6 

Hum.' Economics In 4 

Psychology In 5 

TOTAL 



Course Descriptions 

General 

Armstrong College reserves the right to <li withdraw an) course 
for which less than ten Btudents register. (2) limit the enrollment in 
am course or class section, (3) fix tin- time of meeting of all classes 
and sections, and | h offer such additional courses as demand and 
staff personnel warrant 

\n credit will he given in beginning courses in commerce and 
languages where the same or similar courses have been presented for 
admission from high school. 

Where two or more courses are listed under one description, no 
credit for graduation will be given until the sequence is completed. 

Courses which are offered in the day program are assigned a num- 
ber which is less than 100. All Evening College courses are numbered 
above 100. In course descriptions this number appears in parentheses. 
After each course name, there are three numbers in parentheses. The 
first number listed is the number of hours of lecture: the second, the 
number of hours of laboratory and the third, the number of quarter 
hours of credit the course carries. For example: Biologv 16-17 (116- 
117) Human Biology (5-0-5). 

ARTS 

(See Fine Arts) 

BIOLOGY 

Anatomy and Physiology ln-2n-3n* (2-2-3). Fall, Winter and 
Spring. Laboratorx fee, $2.50. 

A three quarter course in human anatomy and physiology. The 
gross anatomy, some histology and physiology of the organ systems are 
presented in order to give the student an understanding of the human 
body as a basis for further studies in clinical nursing. The labora- 
tory work includes some dissection of the lower vertebrates and ele- 
mentary experiments in physiology. 

Biology UA (IU- A)— General Zoology (3-4-5). Fall and Win- 
ter. Laboratory fee, $3.50. 

Biology 14-Z? — General Zoology (3-6-6). Fall and Winter. Lab- 
oratory fee. S3. 50. 



•These courses are transferrable t<> senior colleges toward a B. S. 
Nursing. 



( 01 RSE DESCRIPTIONS 

Introduction to animal Btructurea and function and a Burve) of 
the invertebrate phyla. Laboratory \\<»rk on representative species oi 

each pin linn. 

Biology I")-/ i 11")-/ • General y.<><>l<>^\ (3 U5). Winter and 
Spring. Laboratory fee, $3.50. Prerequisite: Biology I 1. 

Biology 1")-/)' General Zoology (3-6-6), Winter and Spring. Lab- 
orator) fee, $3.50. Prerequisite: Biolog) 14. 

St ml \ of vertebrate structure and function, using selected verte- 
brate material for laboratory dissection. Concludes with a stud) <>f the 
principle's of Evolution and Genetics. 

Biology L6-17 I 1 10- 1 1 7 ) — Human Biology I 5-0-5 I . Winter and 
Spring. 

A two quarter course for terminal students beginning with a survey 
of the basic biological principles and followed by a study of the struc- 
ture and function of the human body. Principles of Evolution and 
Genetics will be discussed in the last quarter. 

Biology 22 — Invertebrate Zoology (3-6-6). Spring. Laboratory 
fee, $5.00. Prerequisite: Biology 14 and 15. 

A concentrated study of the structure and function of invertebrates 
including their economic relation to man. Field trips included for nat- 
ural habitat study. 

Biology 23 — Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy (3-6-6). Fall. 
Laboratorx fee. s 5.00. Prerequisite: Biology 14 and 15. 

A study of the anatomy and evolution of the organ systems of the 
ver;ebrates. Laboratory work on Squalus, Necturus and the cat. 

Bacteriology \n-2n" (2-2-3). Winter and Spring. Laboratory fee, 
$2.50. 

An introduction to micro-organisms as living organisms and as 
pathogens. The structure, life history and public health importance of 
representative viruses, bacteria, molds, protozoa and helminthes are con- 
sidered. The laboratory work includes the techniques of culturing bac- 
teria and the study of the scientific basis of antiseptic and aseptic- 
procedures. 

CHEMISTRY 

Chemistry In — Chemistry for Nurses (4-2-5). Fall. Laboratory 
fee, $2.50. Laboratory breakage. $2.50.* H 

*These Courses are transferable to senior colleges toward a B. S. degree 
in nursing. 

**Refundable at the end of each quarter if no items have been ' Jst or 
damaged. 



34 ARMSTRONG COLLEGE OF -\\ VMS Ml 

Principles of inorganic, organic and physiological chemistry with 
some special applications to nursing practice. 

Chemistry II illli General Inorganic (5-3-6). Winter. Labora- 
tor) fee, $3.50. Laborator) breakage fee, $2.50 

I he chemistry of some important metallic and non-metallic ele- 
ments including a systematic treatment of chemical principle- and 
their applications. Chemistry II and L5 are identical t<> Chemistry 

16, 17. and L8. 

Chemistry 15 (115) General Inorganic (5-3-6). Spring. Labora- 
tory fee. $3.50. Laborator) breakage fee, $2.50.* Prerequisite: ( 

istr) 14 or its equivalent 

Continuation of Chemistry I 1. 

Chemistry 16 — General Inorganic (3-3-4). Fall. Laboratory fee. 
$2.50. Laboratory breakage fee, $2.50.* 

The chemistry of some important metallic and non-metallic ele- 
ments including a systematic treatment of chemical principles and their 
applications. 

Chemistry 17 — General Inorganic (3-3-4). Winter. Laboratory 
fee, $2.50. Laboratory breakage fee. $2.50.* Prerequisite: Chem- 
istry 16. 

Continuation of Chemistry 16. 

Chemistry 18 — General Inorganic (3-3-4). Spring. Laboratory 
I.e. $2.50. Laboratory breakage fee, $2.50.* Prerequisite: Chemistr) 
1 7 or its equivalent. 

A continuation of Chemistry 16 and 17. 

Chemistry 24 — Qualitative Inorganic Analysis (3-6 6). Fall. 
Laborator\ fee. $5.00. Laboratory breakage fee. $3.00.* Prerequisite: 
Chemistr) 15, L8 or its equivalent. 

A stud) of the fundamental theories of qualitative analysis of 

common cations and anions l>\ semi-micro method-. 

Chemistry 25 a-b — Quantitative Inorganic Analysis i 2-3-3 l . Win- 
ter. Laborator) ice. $3.00. Laboratory breakage fee. > >.n ). Pre- 
requisite: Chemistr) 21 or approval of the instructor. 

A stud) of the fundamental theories and applications of quantita- 
tive analysis involving volumetric and gravimetric methods with the 
emphasis placed on the volumetric methods. No (red it is given for 
this course before completion of Chemistr) 256. 

•Refundable at the end of each quarter if no items have been lost or 
damaged. 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 35 

COMMERCE 

Commerce \lo-b till a-l>\ -Beginning Typing (0-5-2). Fall and 
Winter. Laboratory fee, 13.50. 

This course consists of introductory instruction in the technical 
features and care of the machine, position, fingering, propel technique 
and mastery of the keyboard. An average speed of 111 \s»>rd> a niinitr 
is attained at the end of the second course. 

Commerce lie (111c) — Intermediate Typing I 5 - I . Spring. 
Laboratory fee. S3. 50. Prerequisite: Commerce lla-b or equivale it. 

A typewriting course in which emphasis is placed on speed build ng 
and accuracy- Special typing problems such as business letters, minutes, 
notices, stencil cutting and carbon copies are stressed. 

Commerce \2a-b (112a-6) — Beginning Shorthand (5-0-5). Fall 
and Winter. 

Complete theory of Gregg Shorthand in the manual. Additional 
reading and dictation given from the Speed Studies. 

Commerce 12c ( 112c ► — Intermediate Shorthand (5-0 5). Spring. 

Dictation and transcription of new and studied material. S'.udent 
is required to take dictation at the rate of eighty words a minute. 

Commerce 13a — Burroughs Calculator and Comptometer (0-5-2). 
Fall. Laboratory fee, S3. 50. 

The objective of this course is to build speed and accuracy in the 
operation of the Burroughs Calculator and Comptometer and a thorough 
review of business mathematics. This quarter is devoted to the opera- 
tion of the four fundamentals in arithmetic on the calculator. 

Commerce 136 — Burroughs Calculator and Comptometer (0-5-2 I. 
Winter. Laboratory fee, $3.50. 

The following business mathematics is reviewed and applied on 
the machine during this quarter: decimal equivalents, split division, in- 
voicing over the fixed decimal, percentages, discounts, and chain dis- 
counts, costs, selling and rate of profit. 

Commerce 13c — Burroughs Calculator and Comptometer 1 0-5-2 I . 
Spring. Laboratory fee, S3. 50. 

The third quarter is a continuation of business problems on the 
machine. The transactions covered are reciprocals figuring grain, 
cipher, division, prorating cost and expenses, gross and dozen in in- 
voicing inventories. 

Commerce 11 — Office Practice (5-0-5). Spring. 



36 ARMSTRONG COLLEGE OF SAVANNAH 

Typical business office situations are duplicated as nearK as pos- 
sible. Practical problems deal with typing, operation of the mimeo- 
graph, filing and office courtesy. 

Commerce 21a — Advanced Typing (0-5-2). Fall. Laboratory 
fee, $3.50. Prerequisite: Commerce lie or equivalent. 

Advanced typing is a course in the acquisition of speed and accur- 
acy including various legal forms and papers, manuscript- and business 
papers. 

Commerce 2lb — A continuation of Commerce 2\d (0-5-2). Winter. 
Laboratory fee, $3.50. 

Commerce 21c — A continuation of Commerce 2lb (0-5-2 I. Spring, 
Laboratory fee, $3.50. An average of 60 words a minute is attained. 

Commerce 22a — Advanced Shorthand (5-0-5). Fall. Prerequisites: 
Commerce 12a, b, c. 

A course in which the principles of Gregg Shorthand are applied 
in developing skill and accuracy in writing shorthand and in transcrib- 
ing. The first half year is devoted to dictation of general business ma- 
terial; the second half, to dictation material applying to major vocation-. 

Commerce 226 — A continuation of Commerce 22a I 5-0-5 ) . Winter. 

Commerce 22c — A continuation of Commerce 22b (5-0-5). Spring. 
A speed of 120 words a minute is required. 

Commerce 23a — Advanced Calculator and Comptometer (0-5-2). 
Fall. Laboratory fee, $3.50. 

. 

The next two quarters are devoted to the application of the machine 
and business mathematics to the following businesses: drugs, hardware, 
electrical, plumbing, contracting, wholesale paper, pay roll, packing 
house, creameries and dairies, laundries, steel and iron, department 
stores, banks, lumber, petroleum, railroads. 

Commerce 23b — A continuation of Commerce 2'3a (0-5-2). Winter. 
Laboratory fee, $3.50. 

Commerce 23c — Advanced Calculator and Comptometer (0-5-2). 
Spring. Laboratory fee. $3.50. 

Speed, skill and accuracy in the operation of the machine are 
stressed in this last period. 

Commerce 24 (124) — Principles of Accounting, Introductory 
(5-0-5). 



C01 RSE DESCRIPTIONS 37 



\n introduction to the fundamental principles and procedures of 
including a stud) of tin- journal, tin- ledger, accounting 
statements, controlling accounts, Bpecial journals and the accounting 
s) stem. 

Commerce 25 i 125 1 — Principles of Accounting, Introductory 
(5-0-5). Winter. Prerequisite: Commerce 24. 

\n application of accounting principles to certain problems such 
as the proprietorship, the partnership, the corporation, departmental 

operations, manufacturing accounts and the analysis of accounting 
statements. 

Commerce 26 — Principles of Accounting, Intermediate (5-0-5). 

Spring. Prerequisite: Commerce 25. 

Basic accounting theory with emphasis on the various form- ol 
business organization, assets, liabilities and reserves. 

Commerce 27 ( 127 I — Business Lau (5-0-5). Winter. 

Contracts: offer and acceptance, consideration, performance, rights 
of third parties and discharge. Agency: creation of an agency, liabilities 
of principal and agent. Negotiable instruments: elements of negotia- 
bility, endorsement and transfer, liabilities of parties, discharge. 

Commerce 28 (128) — Business Law (5-0-5). Spring. Prerequisite: 
Commerce 27. 

Partnership: formation, powers, liabilities of partners, termination. 
Corporation: formation, powers, rights of security holders, types of 
securities. Sales: vesting of title, warrants, remedies. 

Commerce 115 — Business Correspondence (5-0-51. Fall. 

^A study of business correspondence, letters, information reports, 
follow-up Sales programs, statistical analysis and inter-office communi- 
cations. Stress is placed on the mastery of fundamentals of clear 
writing. 

Commerce 129 — Cost Accounting (5-0-5). Spring. Prerequisite: 
Commerce 125. 

Methods of determining and distributing costs in manufacturing 
and other concerns, stressing the securing of unit costs under both 
the order and the process methods. 

Commerce 131 — Retail Advertising and Sales Promotion ( 5-0-5 i. 

A course in retail advertising and sales promotion basically con- 
cerned with selling in the retail fields — emphasizing the psychology 
of advertising as a branch of sales. The course explores the various 



38 ARMSTRONG COLLEGE OF SAVANNA H 

media and culminates with direct sales approaches. Primarily an 
advertising course, it can be easily tailored to meet the needs of the 
average salesman. 



ECONOMICS 

Economics 21 (121) — Principles of Economics (5-0-5). Fall 
and Summer. 

A study of the principles behind the economic institutions of the 
present time and an examination of some of the economic problems 
in the modern world. 

Economics 24 (124) — Problems of Economics (5-0-5). Spring. 
Prerequisite: Economics 21. 

A study of economic problems based upon the principles studied 
in Economics 21. 

Economics 130 — Personnel Administration (5-0-5). Spring. Pre- 
requisites: Elementary Psychology and Economics. 

Through lectures, field trips, and conferences with executives, a 
study is made of the principles and practices in the field of the ad- 
ministration of human relations in industry. Emphasis is given to 
scientific techniques and devices in the development of a well-rounded 
personnel program. 



ENGINEERING 

Engineering 11 (111) — Engineering Drawing (0-6-3). Fall. 

Topics of study include lettering; the use of the instruments: 
orthographic projection; auxiliary views; sections and conventions. 

Eng'neering 12 (112) — Engineering Drawing (0-6-3). Winter. 
Prerequisite: Engineering 11. 

Topics of study include drawing conventions; dimensions; pic- 
torial representation; threads and fastenings: shop processes; technical 
sketching; working drawings: pencil tracing on paper, reproduction 
processes. 

Engineering 13 (113) — Engineering Drawing (0 6-3). Spring. 
Prerequistie: Engineering 12. 

Topics of study include technical sketching of piping and fittings; 
working drawings: ink tracing on cloth: working drawings from as- 
semblies and assemblies from working drawings. 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 39 

Engineering 1 () //>/'//<■</ Descriptive Geometry (0-6-3). Spring. 
Prerequisite: Engineering 12. 

Topics of stwd\ include the solution of problems involving points, 
lines, and planes l>\ use of auxiliary views: the solution of problems 
involving points, lines, and planes by revolution methods: simple inter- 
sections; developments of surfaces: an introduction to warped surfaces. 
Practical applications are emphasized. 

Engineering 26— Plane Surveying (1-3-2). Spring. Prerequisite: 

Mathematics 17. I Not offered in 1953-54). 

The theory of practice in chaining, differential and profile leveling. 
traversing, topographic surveying, reduction and plotting of field notes 
and mapping. 

ENGLISH 

English 11 (111 'I — Freshman English (3-0-3). Fall and Spring. 

A survey of Western Literature, in which books are read complete, 
rather than in selections: a review of grammar and practice in written 
English is also undertaken. English 11-12-13 integrates with History 
11-12-13 for the entire Freshman year. The discussion method is 
consistently used throughout the year. 

English 12 (112) — A continuation of English 11 (3-0-3). Fall 
and Winter. 

English 13 (113) — A continuation of English 12 (3-0-3). Spring 
and Winter. 

English 20 — Grammar and Composition (5-0-5). Fall. 

A general review of grammar, composition and vocabulary. The 
students will have practice in writing themes, making oral reports, and 
in writing business letters. Several books will be assigned for outside 
reading and discussion. 

English 21 — Sophomore English — A Survey of World Literature 
(3-0-3). (Not offered 1953-1954). 

A study is made of the principal works of certain major writers, 
such as Shakespeare, Goethe, Ibsen and poets of the nineteenth century. 
The last third of the course is devoted to the study of a number of 
modern American dramas, and modern British and American poetry. 

English 22— A continuation of English 21 (3-0-3). (Not offered 
1953-1954). 

English 23 — A continuation of English 22 (3-0-3). (Not offered 
1953-1954). 



lii ARMSTRONG COLLEGE 01 SAVANNAH 



Englis/i 21v (121*) Sophomore English I Survey of World 
Literature (5-0-5). Fall and Winter. 

Tlii- course is designed to give the students a knowledge of the 
principal w<>rk- «»f certain major writer-, such as Shakespeare, Goethe. 
Ibsen and poets of the nineteenth century. The last part of the course 
is devoted to the >tud\ of a number of modern American dramas, and 
modern British and American poetry. 

English 22 v (122y) — A continuation of English 21v (5-0-5). 
Winter and Spring. 

English 24 — An Introduction to Poetry (5-0-5). Spring. 

\ stud} of the various types and forms of poetrj with special 
emphasis on more recent poetr\ . 

English 25 — American Literature (5-0-5). Fall. 

\ survey of American Literature and culture. Each student is 
asked to select one particular period or area or author for concentra- 
tion, making reports and writing papers in that phase of the w«.rk. 
The course is primarily conducted b\ reading and discussion. 

English 26 — Advanced Composition (5-0-5). Winter. 

\dvanced practice in composition of all sorts: criticism of themes 
in an effort to learn exposition: description in prose is attempted. 
Creative writing is encouraged. 

English 27 — Reading Modern Drama I 5-0-5 i . Winter. 

Class reading and discussion of dramas. The plays will not be 
acted. The course is centered on appreciation of drama, diction, and 
reading ability . 

English 28 l 128 I — Public Speaking I 5-0-5 l . Spring. 

Fundamental principles involved in group discussion and the prep- 
aration and delivery of original speeches for formal occasions. The 
physiology of speech is included. 

English lll.v — Freshman English (5-0-5). Fall. Spring and 
Summer. (Not offered 1953-1954). 

This course covers a review of punctuation and the fundamentals 
of grammar, theme writing, and vocabulary building. Also the student 
reads and discusses selections from the works of the most prominent 
literarv figures of the Western World. 

English 112v — / continuation oj English lll.v (5-0-5). Winter 
and Summer (Nol offered in 1953-1954). 



i()l RSE DESCRIPTIONS H 



Selections from the works <»f the following authors v\ill I"- read: 
Homer. Sophocles, Chaucer, Montaigne, Cellini, Voltaire, Checkov, 
Hard) a^ well as those »»f certain English Romantic poets. 

FINE VRTS 
/// II Creative lit (2-6-5). Spring. 
Drawing, art principles and design with work in other media at the 

discretion of the instructor. Some application will be made to poster- 
making, lettering and everydaj life needs. 

/// 113 — Ceramics (5-0-5). Each quarter. Lab fee. $2.00. 

A beginners course. Instruction is concerned with learning to 
handle clay, to form potter) and sculpture, and to decorate, glaze and 
fire the pieces made. 

Art 114 — Advanced Ceramics I 5-0-5 I . Each quarter. Lab fee. 
$2.00. 

Emphasis is placed on making larger pieces, studying good forms 
suited to the nature of clay. Instruction in loading and firing the kiln. 

Art 115 — Drawing and Painting (5-0-51. Laboratory fee. $2.00. 

A course in the elements of pictorial composition, drawing and 
color. Basic work and experimentation will be conducted from still 
life, natural forms, and living models. Combined with the studio 
work will be discussions and reviews in history and appreciation of art. 

During latter course sessions, efforts will be made to provide 
special instruction to students desiring particular information on tech- 
niques and methods. 

Art 116 — Drawing and Painting (5-0-51. Laboratory fee. S2.00. 

A continuation of Art 115. 

Music 11 — Elementary Theory and Sifiht Redding (5-0-5). Fall. 
(Not offered 19.53-1954). 

A course designed to teach the student to read music at sight and 
to understand the fundamental principles of music theory. Melodic dic- 
tation, melody writing and an introduction to elementary harmoo) are 

included. 

Music 12 — Theory and Harmony (5-0-5). Winter. Prerequisite: 
Music 11. (Not offered 1953-1954). 

A continuation of Music 11. with emphasis on harmony, harmonic 
dictation, four-part harmonic writing. 



42 ARMSTRONG COLLEGE OF SAVANNAH 

Music 20 — Music Appreciation (5-0-5). Spring. 

A course designed to help the student understand and enjoy great 
music. Several works will he analyzed in detail as to form and struc- 
ture. A text will be used for factual background; class time being con- 
centrated on brief exposition of themes followed 1>\ listening to records. 
Music and composers from the Early Christian period up through 
the modern period will be studied. 

Music 115 — Appreciation of Music (2-0-2). 

A course designed for the musically untrained who wish an intelli- 
gent understanding of the arts of music. Lectures, discussions and 
recorded listening sessions comprise the course. 

Music 116 — Appreciation of Music (2-0-2). 

A continuation of Music 115. 

Music 117 — Appreciation of Music (2-0-2). 

A continuation of Music 116. 

Music 121— Class Voice (2-0-2). 

Group instruction in fundamentals of voice production, articula- 
tion, diction, breath control, physical and mental poise, applied in the 
study of songs. 

Music 122— Class Voice (2-0-2). 

A continuation of Music 121. 

Music 123— Class Voice (2-0-2). 

A continuation of Music 122. 

Music 124^-Class Piano (2-0 2). 

Group instruction in fundamentals of piano-playing with emphasis 
on practical application. The study of piano material appropriate to 
the level of the individual student. 

Music 125— Class Piano (2-0-2). 

A continuation of Music 124. 

Music 126— Class Piano (2-0-2). 

A continuation of Music 125. 



COURSE DE SCRIPTION* 43 

FOREIGN LANG1 \u - 

Frew ii 

French 11-12 (111-112)— Elementary French (5-0-5). Fall and 

Winter. 

\ course for beginners. The spoken language is studied as well as 
grammar and reading. 

French 21 Intermediate French (5-0 5). Fall and Spring. Pre- 
requisite: Two quarters of college French or two years of high school 
French. 

Review grammar, oral practice, reading of selected texts. 

French 22 — Intermediate French, continued (5-0-5). Winter. Pre- 
requisite: Three quarters of college French or three years of high school 
French. 

Further reading of texts, oral and composition practice. 

French 23 — French Literature of the Nineteenth Century (5-0-5). 

Prerequisite: French 22. (Not offered in 1953-1954). 

A survey course. Reading of texts, written and oral reports on 
collateral reading. 

French 24 — French Classical Drama (5 5). Spring. Prerequisite: 
French 22. 

Selected plays of Corneille, Moliere and Racine. 



German 

German 111 — Elementary German (5-0-5). Fall. 

Elements of the grammar, reading of simple texts and speaking. 
German records, films and photographs. 

German 112 — Intermediate German (5-0 5). Winter. 

Grammar, more reading of selected texts and speaking. German 
records, films and photographs. 

German 121 — Advanced German (5-0 5). Spring. 

Grammar review. Reading of short stories and German magazines. 
Composition and conversation. German records, films and photo- 
graphs. 



44 ARMSTRONG COLLEGE OF SAVANNAH 

Spanish 

Spanish 11-12 — Elementary (5-0-5). Fall and Winter. 

These courses are for the purpose of providing the student with 
the elements of Spanish reading, composition and conversation. 

Spanish 21 — Intermediate Spanish (5-0-5). Fall and Spring. 

This course gives the student an opportunity to review the ele- 
ments of Spanish grammar and to delve into the fine points of the 
language. 

Spanish 22 — Advanced Spanish (5-0-5). Winter. 

The purpose of this course is to increase the student's facility in 
Spanish composition and conversation through selected reading. 

Spanish 23 — Commercial Spanish (5-0-5). Spring. 

This course includes a study of business letters and forms used by 
the Spanish-speaking world and drills on the vocabulary of trade, travel 
and communications. 

Spanish 24 — Modern Prose Readings ( 5-0-5 I . Spring. 

Intensive reading of nineteenth and twentieth century Spanish and 
Latin American authors comprise this course. 

Spanish 25 — Comprehensive Reading and Advanced Conversation 
15-0-5). Spring. 

This course is planned for the student who has had at least three 
quarters, and preferably four quarters, of Spanish. Stress is placed 
on comprehensive reading and conversation based on a selected text. 

History 

History 11 (111) — An Historical Introduction to Contemporary 
Civilization (3-0-3). Fall and Spring. 

This course comprises a chronological survey of the main currents 
of political, social, religious and philosophical activity in Western Civil- 
zation from the period of the sixth century in Greece to the present time. 

History 12 (112) — A continuation of History 11 (3-0-31. Fall. 
Winter. 

History 13 (113) — A continuation of History 12 I 3-0-3 I . Winter. 
Spring. 

In addition to a chronological treatment of events studied in the 
above courses, the dynamics of Western Civilization are studied in 






COlKSi: DES CRIPTIONS 15 

works of the following a ut h» »r> : Plato, Lucretius, St Augustine, Dante, 
Machiavelli, Descartes, Locke, Jefferson, Rousseau, Vdam Smith, 

Ricardo, Malthus. IVntham. Marx. Shaw and Mersey. 

Histor\ Ll-12-13 an- required <>f all Btudenta seeking an Associate 
degree from Armstrong College of Savannah and arc designed to be 
complementary with English 11-12-13. 

History 22 Latin American (5-0-5). Spring. 

This course Burveys the colonial, revolutionary and recent develop* 

mentS in tin 1 countries of Hispanic America. 

History, 25— Recent European History (5-0-5). Spring. 

This course is designed to provide an opportunity for detailed stud\ 
of major national and international developments in European affairs 
from about 1870 to the present time. Special emphasis is devoted to 
the first World War and new developments in Europe following that 
war and the complex of world events which preceded the Second World 
War. 

History 26 — Recent American History (5-0-5). Fall and Winter. 

This course has as its purpose the examination of the most im- 
portant events and movements, political, social and cultural, in Ameri- 
can life from about 1900 to the present time. 

History lll.v — An Historical Introduction to Contemporary Civili- 
zation (5, 0-5 I. Fall. Spring and Summer (Not offered 1953-54). 

This course comprises a chronological survey of the main currents 
of political, social, religious and philosophical activity in Western 
Civilization from the period of the sixth century in Greece to the pres- 
ent time. 

History 112) — A Continuation of History 111* (5-0-5). Winter 
and Summer (Not offered 1953-541. 

In addition to a chronological treatment of events studied in the 
above courses, the dynamics of Western Civilization are studied in 
works of the following authors: Plato, Lucretius, St. Augustine, Dante. 
Machiavelli, Descartes, Locke, Jefferson, Rousseau, Adam Smith. Ricar- 
do, Malthus. Bentham. Marx. Shaw and Hersev. 



HOME ECONOMICS 

Home Economics 10a — Orientation: Careers (3-0-3). Fall. 

The many opportunities available in the field, such as food spe- 
cialists, nutrition experts, nursery school teachers, marriage counselors 



46 ARMSTRONG COLLEGE OF SAVANNAH 

and n hers will be discussed. Professional experts in these fields will 
\i-ii the class to show the man) vocations dealing with the home. 

Home Economics 10/; — Orientation: Personal Development 
(30-3). Winter. 

How to be more attractive through personal grooming and what 
is appropriate in manners and dress on various social occasions are 
emphasized. 

Home Economics In — Nutrition and Food Preparation (3-2-4). 
Winter. 

A study of the laws governing the food requirements of human 
beings for maintenance of growth, activity, reproduction, and lactation. 
Complete meals are prepared and served in each laboratory period. 

Home Economics 11 — Clothing (2 6-5). Fall. 

Planning and making individual wardrobes. Fashions, design and 
fabrics are studied. 

Home Economics 12 — Foods (3-4-5). Spring. 

This course is based on the human food needs. Preparation and 
attractive serving of meals is studied. 

Home Economics 21 — Home Furnishings (4-2-5). Fall. 

The interior and exterior planning of the home is studied. Em- 
phasis is placed on styles of furniture, color and decoration fabrics 
used in the home. 

Home Economics 23 — Elementary Textiles and Clothing for the 
Family (2-6-5). Winter. 

Practical application of elementary textile study to the selection 
and use of clothing for the family. 

Home Economics 24 — Family Fundamentals (5-0-5). Spring. 

A course in the family with the problems that one faces in the 
preparation for children and the adjustment to these children. 



MATHEMATICS 

Mathematics 10 — Basic Skills in Mathematics (5-0-5). 

(Not open to students who have high school credit for two years 
of algebra and one of plane geometn . I 

This course provides an opportunity for the student to acquire 






( 01 RSE DESCRIPTIONS i. 



basic skills in mathematics necessary t«> meet the common demands «»f 
\ ai ious college programs. 

Topics from plane geometr) include t f 1 * * properties <>f Buch geo- 
metric figures as polygons, triangles and circles. 

Topics from algebra include fractions, signed numbers, linear 

equations, ratio, proportions, variation, elements <>f finance and graphs. 

Mathematics 10 I L16)— College Algebra (5-0-5). Kail and Spring. 
Prerequisite: Two years of high school algebra and one of plane 

i>vnmetr>. or Mathematics 10. 

The course consists <>f functions and graphs, logarithms, linear 
and quadratic equations, the binomial theorem, complex numbers and 
the elementary theory of equations. 

Mathematics 17 I 117 I — Trigonometry I 5-0-5 I. Fall and Winter. 
Prerequisite: Mathematics 16. 

A course covering the solution of the right and general triangle, 
the general solution of trigonometric equations, trigonometric identi- 
ties, polar coordinates. 

Mathematics 18 l 118) — Plane Analytic Geometry (5-0-5). Winter 
and Spring. Prequisite: Mathematics 17. 

Analytic geometry of the point and the line, elementary conic sec- 
tions, polar coordinates, transcendental curves and transformation of 
coordinates. 

Mathematics 19 (119) — Mathematics of Finance (3-0-3). Spring. 
Prerequisite: Mathematics 16. 

This course gives that background necessary for dealing with 
problems found in banking, real estate, financing, and accounting: the 
operation of the compound-interest law in business; simple problems 
concerning bonds, sinking funds, valuation of properties and annuities. 
Practical problems in these fields will be emphasized. The necessary 
aids and shortcuts and use of tables and logarithms will be studied. 

Mathematics 21 (121) — Differential Calculus (5-0-5). Fall. Pre- 
requisite: Mathematics L8. 

Theory of differentiation, with application to tangents: maxima 
and minima, rates, curvature, velocity and acceleration, approxima- 
tions, and Newton's method. 

Mathematics 22 (122) — Integral Calculus (5-0-5). Winter. Pre- 
requisite: Mathematics 21. 



48 ARMSTRONG COLLEGE OF SAVANNAH 

Formulas and methods <>f integration, single integration applied 
in areas and lengths; volumes and surfaces <>f revolution; centroids 

and moments <>f inertia: pressure and work. 

Mathematics 99 — Intermediate Algebra for College Students 
(5-0-5). Fall and Spring. 

A study of llif fundamental operations of algebra together with 
factoring, fractions, linear equations, exponents and radicals, quadratic 
equations, graphical methods, ratio and proportion, and functional 

notation. 



MUSIC 
(See Fine Arts) 

PHILOSOPHY 

Philosophy 111-112-113 (2-0-2). Fall. Winter and Spring. 
An informal discussion of the thinking of certain Greek. Roman, 
Early Christian. Renaissance, and modern writers. 

Physical Education 

Physical Education 11 — Conditioning Course (0-3-1). Fall. 

Consists of calisthenics, stunts and tumbling, lifts and carries, road 
work, dual combatives, and simple games. 

Physical Education 12 — Team Sports (0-3-1). Winter. 

Consists of basketball, soccer, speedball and volleyball. 

Physical Education 13 — Elementary Swimming (0-3-1 1. Spring. 

Physical Education 14 — Officiating of Basketball for Women 
(1-3-2). Winter. Prerequisite: P. E. 12 or the equivalent. 

Consists of a study of rules interpretation and actual experience 
in coaching and officiating in class and intramural games. Elective 
credit, except when substituted for P. E. 12. 

Physical Education 20 — First Aid and Safety Education (4-0-3). 
Winter. 

The American Red Cross standard course in first aid is followed 
by a broad consideration of the opportunities for safetv teaching in 
the school program. 

Physical Education 21 — Elementary Tennis I 0-3-1 1. Fall. 



COl RSE DESCRIPTIONS 19 



I'lnsical Education -.1 Elementary Boxing foi lien (0-3-1). 
Winter. 

Physical Education 23 Senioi Life Saving and Instructors Course 
in Swimming for Men (2*3-2). Spring. 

Physical Education _1 Boxing for Teachers (2-3-2). Winter. 

Physical Education 25 — Folk Rhythms (0-3-] I. Fall. 

Physical Education 26 Modem Dante for Women (0-3-1). 

Winter. 

Physical Education 27 — 7V//> Dance jot Beginners (0-3-1 I. Winter. 

Physical Education 28 — //</«// Recreative Sports (0-3-1). Spring. 

Consists of passive, semi-active, and active games and sports which 
have carry-over value for later life. 

Physical Education 29 — Folk Rhythms for Teachers (2-3-2). Fall. 

This course consists of advanced training in folk dances and prac- 
tice teaching of those dances. 

Physical Education 30 — Archery (0-3-1). Spring. 

Physics 

Physics 11 (111 I — General Physics (5-2-6). Winter. Laboratory 
fee, $2.50. Prerequisite: a course in college mathematics or consent 
of the instructor. 

Lectures, demonstrations, recitations and laboratory work covering 
the fields of mechanics and heat. 

Physics 12 (112) — General Physics (5-2-6). Spring. Laboratory 
fee, $250. Prequisite: Physics 11 or consent of the instructor. 

Lectures, demonstrations, recitations and laboratory work covering 
the fields of electricity, sound and light. 

Political Science 

Political Science 12 (112 I — The Governments of Foreign Powers 
(5-0-5). Summer and Winter. 

A study is made of the leading modern political theories, and 
attention is paid to the structure and powers of the major foreign gov- 
ernments. 

Political Science 13 (113) — Government of the United States 
(5-0-51. Fall and Winter. 



50 VRMSTRONG COLLEGE OF >\VANNAH 



\ Btudj is made of the structure, theory, workings of the national 
government in the I nited States and some of the major problems of 
the Btate and local government. The course shows how developmental 
practice has created our government as it stands today. 



Psychology 

Psychology \n i 5-0-5 I . 

This course is an introduction to the study of human behavior 
with emphasis on the underlying principles of mental adjustments. 

The importance of the nurse's own personality is stressed. 

Psychology 21 I 121 ) — Introductory Psychology I 5-0-5 I . Fall ami 
Winter. 

In this course human behavior is analyzed into its elementan 
functions of learning, feeling, thinking, maturation, motives and con- 
flicts. Facts and principles from scientific research in psychology are 
used for understanding these functions and for measuring individual 
differences in ability, personality and development. Standardized 
experiments and the student's own experiences are used to explore and 
apply the facts in this field. 

Psychology 22 (122) — Social Psychology (5-0-5). Spring. Pre- 
requisite: Psychology 21. 

This course provides a study of the interactions between the indi- 
vidual and his social groups. Basic psychological processes of sensory- 
perceptual behavior, motivation, learning and thinking are studied as 
they affect an individual's adjustment to the social groups and institu- 
tions of our culture. Special attention is given to a study of group 
membership, leadership, development of attitudes and values, public 
opinion, propaganda, prejudice and other inter-group tensions. 

Psychology 23 (123) — Child Psychology (5-0-5). Spring. Pre- 
requisite: Psychology 21. 

This course offers a study of the developmental factors operating 
in a child's experience which make for. or interfere with, effective 
expression of his capacities and adjustments to life situations. Sources 
are drawn from experimental research and from findings of analytic 
psychology. Direct observation of children individually and in a 
nursery is used as a source for class discussion. 

Psychology 25 — Psychology of Adjustment (5-0-5). Fall. 

The class setting is used in this course for direct experience of 
the use of group discussion for self-understanding. This is supplemented 
by systematic written self-analysis. 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 51 



Psychology L25 Psy* holog) of Idjustment i. 5-0-5). Fall and 
\\ inter. 

Emphasis on the Bell and self-analysis. I Be is made of free di» 

CUSSlOn and pswho drama techniques. 



PUBLIC SPEAKING 
(See English 28) 

Sociology 

Sociology in — Elementary Sociology (5-0-5). Fall. 

This course considers (1) the principles of sociology; i2) the 
nurse as a citizen of the community and as a professional worker: (3) 
the importance of the hospital among the social agencies in the com- 
munity; (4) the patient in the hospital coming from the family and 
returning to the family. 

Sociology 20 (120) — Introductory Sociology (5-0-5). Winter. 

A study of the principles of social organizations in American cul- 
ture based on scientific studies of groups, "races." population and of 
the institutionalized functions of society. 

Sociology 21 (121) — Marriage and the Family (5-0-5). Winter 
and Spring. 

This course introduces the family as an institution in various 
cultures as a setting for studying the institutional characteristics of the 
modern American family. This is followed by analysis of personality 
development basic to mature marital love, choice of a mate, marital 
adjustment, parenthood, family administration, and sociological trends 
for family stability, family disorganization and adjustment of the aging. 



SPANISH 

(See Foreign Languages) 

Social Science 

Social Science 4 — Contemporary Georgia (5-0-5). Summer. 

A study of current economic and social statistics as pertaining to 
agriculture, industry, and commerce: population trends, and govern- 
mental organization and problems. 



ARMSTRONG COLLEGE 

LIBRARY 






ARMSTRONC 

OF SAVANNAH 



^«-ei 




it-HP 



19S4 



fef 



SAVANNAH, GEORGIA 



For Reference ] 



Not to be taken from this room 



1954- 1935 



SI \1\1LK 



KALI. 



\\ INTKI! 



SPRING 



BULLETIN OF 



Armstrong College 



of Savannah 



A City Supported Junior College 
SAVANNAH, GEORGIA 




18345 



Membership In 



American Association of Junior Colleges 
Southern Association of Colleges and Secondary School- 
Association of Georgia Colleges 
Georgia Association of Junior Colleges 



VOLUME XIX 



NUMBER 1 



ARMSTRONG COLLEGE 

LIBRARY 



( \U.\I)\I! FOB L954 L955 
SI MMKK SESSION - EVENING COLLEGE 1954 

Mi;- I TERM 

Registration Monday. June 14 

Classes begin Tuesday, June 15 

Last daj to register for credit Monday. June 21 

Mid-term reports due Thursday, July 1 

Examinations Thursday and Friday. July 22-23 

SECOND TERM 

Registration Monday. July 26 

Classes begin Tuesday. July 27 

Last day to register for credit Monday, August 2 

Mid-term reports due Thursday, August 12 

Examinations Thursday and Friday. September 2-3 

FALL QUARTER 

Freshman testing and Sophomore counseling Tuesday, September 14 

Freshman orientation Wednesday through Friday. September 15 17 

Registration Monday, September 20 

( lasses begin Tuesday. September 21 

Last day to register for credit Friday, October 1 

Mid-term reports due Friday. October 22 

Thanksgiving holidays Thursday through Sunday, November 25 28 

Pre-registration Wednesday through Friday, December 1-3 

Examinations Wednesday through Friday, December 8-10 

Parade and basketball game Saturday, December 11 

Homecoming reception and dance Monday, December 20 

Christmas Holidays Monday, December 13 through Monday. January 3 

WINTER QUARTER 

Registration Monday, January 3 

Classes begin Tuesday, January 4 

Last day to register for credit Monday. January 17 

Mid-term reports due Monday. February 7 

Pre-registration Wednesday through Friday. March 2 4 

Examination- Monday through Wednesday. March 14 16 

Spring holidays Thursday through Saturday. March 17-19 

SPRING QUARTER 

Registration Monday. March 21 

( lasses begin Tuesday, March 22 

Last day to register for credit Friday. April 1 

Mid-term reports due Friday. April 22 

Pre registration. Summer and Fall Quarters. 

Wednesday through Friday. May 18-20 

Examinations Monday. May 30 - Wednesday, June 1 

Sophomore Beach Part] Friday. June 3 

Sophomore - \lumni Luncheon Saturday. June 4 

(Graduation Mondav. June 6 






Administration 

THE COLLEGE COMMISSION 

Hi Rs< in i \ . J] nkins Chairman 

\\ 11. 1. 1 \m Mi rphei Vice-chairman 

Nephew K. Clark, Ex-officio Vu roR B. Jenkins 

William \. Early, Ex-officio Herbert L. Kayton 

Oun I. Fulmer, Ex-officio Charles S. Sanford, Ex-officio 

James P. Houlihan, Ex-officio Dr. Helen Sharplei 

Kkkd W ess els, Jr. 

ADMINISTRATIVE STAFF AND FACULTY 
Foreman M. Hawes, A.B., M.S. President 

^RTHUR M. GlGNlLLlAT. A.B.. M.A. Director of the Evening College 

JULE C. Rossiter, Associate in Arts Secretary and Trea.su/fi 

\\\\ Com: Seyle, A. EL Registrar 

W. Orson Beecher, A.B.. M.A.. Emory University: M.A.. University 
of Georgia 

Instructor in History 

\\ illiam L. Bell. B.S. in Education, Georgia Teachers College: Grad- 
uate study. George Peabody College for Teachers 
Basketball Coach and Instructor in Physical Education for Men 

** Stephen P. Bond. Bachelor of Science and Architecture. Georgia 
Institute of Technology 

Instructor in Engineering 

Arthur W. Casper, B.S., Beloit College: M.S., University of Wisconsin 

Instructor in Mathematics and l } hvsics 

Lamar W. Davis, B.S. and M.S.. University of South Carolina: Certi- 
fied Public Accountant 

Instructor in Business Administration 

Josephine Simmons Denmark. B.S.. Georgia Teachers College: M.S. 
in H.E., Lniversity of Georgia 

■ Instructor in Home Economics 

Joseph W. Green, A.B., Birmingham-Southern College; M.A., Van- 
derbilt Lniversity: Graduate Study toward a doctorate. Vander- 
bilt Universitx 

Instructor in English 



** Parttime instructors 



\i:\l>'l l?()\G COLLEGE OF SAVANNAH 



••Harriette \. Haines, Graduate of the Pape School, Draughon's 
Business College 

Instructor in Typewriting 

\\\i LORE Stelljes HaRRELL, \. \.. Armstrong College of Savannah 
Clerical Assistant in the business Office 

SANDRA Hart Harvey. A. A., Armstrong College of Savannah 
Clerical Assistant in the Registrar's Office 

I \<> K.ASK. B.S.. University of Georgia; (Graduate Study at the Uni- 
versity of Minnesota 

Instructor in Chemistry 

Joseph I. Killorin. A.B.. St. Johns College: M.A.. Columbia Uni- 
versity 

Instructor in History 

Margaret Spencer Llbs. B.M., Converse College: A.B.. I niversiti of 
Georgia: M.A.. Columbia University 

Instructor in French and English 

Virginia Mattson. Dickinson College. Junior College Certificate 
Assistant to the Librarian 

Elmo M. McCray, Jr.. B.S. and M.S., University of Alabama 
Instructor in Biology 

Helen Hyde M'cIntire. B.A. and M.A.. University of Mississippi 
Instructor in History and Political Science 

Helen Meighen. Taylor's Business College 

Secretary to Director of the Evening College 

Marjorie A. Mosley. Associate in Finance and Commerce, Armstrong 
College of Savannah 

Secretary to the President 

Jack H. Padgett. A.B.. Wofford College: M.A.. University of Nortl 

Carolina 

Instructor in Mathematics 

** James Harry Persse, B.F.A.. Universit) of Georgia: Master of 
Music. Florida State Universit) 

Director of the Glee Club 

Jack Porter. A.B.. George Peabody College for Teachers; M.A.. Uni 
versify of North Carolina 
Instructor in English and Director of the Armstrong Masquers 



VDMINISTR \TI<>\ 



\{w Rowland, \ T>.. Mercer University; Master «>f Librarianship, 
Emor) I niversit) 

Librarian 

Priscilla Jane Thomas, \.l'>.. Bessie Tift College; M.S.. Emor) I ni- 
versit) 

Instructor in Biology 

DoROim Thompson, \.l».. Monmouth College; M.A., Northwestern 
Universit) ; Certificate of Psychiatric Social Work. Western Re- 
sen e I niversit) 

Instructor in Psychology and Sociology 
"Carmen Torrie, B.S., Concord College; M.S., Universit) of Ten- 
nessee 
Director of Ithletics and Instructor in Physical Education 

Dorothy Morris \\ vdk. B.S.. I niversit) of Tennessee 

Instructor in Physical Education /or Women and 
Acting Director of the Physical Education Program 

GLADYS \i< HOLS ZlLCH, Diploma from the Gregg School of Chicago 
Instructor in Commerce 

Elizabeth Pound, Georgia State College for Women, -State Teachers 
College 

Director of the Student Center 



ARMSTRONG EVENING COLLEGE INSTRUCTORS 

Lorraine Anchors. A.B. and M.A.. Baylor Universit) 

Instructor in English 

Betty Burns, B.S., University of Houston 

Instructor in Psychology 

Mary Caterisan, B.S.. Georgia State College for Women; M.A., Emory 
University 

Instructor in Commerce 

James W. Carter, A.B., University of Florida: Graduate School, Uni- 
versity of Florida 

Instructor in Music 

Josiah K. Cobb, Railroad Freight Traffic School; College of Advanced 
Traffic 

Instructor in Transportation and Traffic 



* On leave of absence 



VRMSTRONG COLLEGE OF SAVANNAH 



I l)\\ii> Cooley, B.S., Duke University 

I it si i ucl or in Mathematics 

Orlando Diaz, IIS.. Phillips University; M.A.. Phillips Universin 

Instructor in Spanish 

Zoltan .1 Farkas, Ph.D., I niversit) of Budapest, Hangar) 

Instructor in German 

Theodore B. FlTZ-SlMONS, Associate in Arts. Armstrong College of 
Savannah; A.B.. Universit) of Georgia 

Instructor in Political Science 

Michael J. Gannam, B.A.. I niversit) of Georgia: M.A.. Universit) of 

North Carolina: L.L.B.. University of Georgia 
Instructor in Political Science 

Robert G. Hattyvtck, B.A.. Ohio State University: M.B.A., Ohio State 
University: Ph.D.. Florida State University 
Instructor in Psychology 

Rosa B. Hopson, A.B.. Middlebury College; M.A.. University of Geor- 
gia: Certificate from Sorbonne I niversity 

Instructor in English and French 

Virginia U. Hudson. B.S.. Education, Georgia State College for Wom- 
en: M.A.. Duke I niversity 

Instructor in History 

Arthur H. Jette. E.E.. Cornell University: M.S.. Western Reserve 
Universit \ 

Instructor in Sociology 

Warren R. Jones, B.C.E., Georgia Institute of Technology 
Instructor in Engineering Drawing 

Patrick J. Keluey. Assistant General Traffic Manager. Benton Rapid 
Express 

Instructor in Trajfic and Transportation 

Kenneth F. Klinkert, B.S., I Diversity of Wisconsin: M.S.W.. in Psy- 
chiatric Social Work, Tulane Universit) 

Instructor in Sociology 

Joseph C. Muller, B.B.A., Universit) of Georgia 
Instructor in Commerce 

CHRISTOPHER B. Ml RPHY, Jr.. Student Beaux Arts Institute and The 
\rt Students 1 Ueague, New York 

Instructor in Drawing, and Painting 



ADMINISTRATION 



Margari i \. Murphy, l'>. \.. I niversit) of Georgia; Advanced Study. 
Columbia I niversiti 

instructor in Ceramics 

Robert \. Porter, A.B., Duke I niversity; M.S.S.W.. School of Social 
Work, Richmond Professional Institute of ihe College of William 

and Man 

Instructor in Psychology 

Harold J. Reeves, U.S.. Brown University; M.B.A., University of 
Penns) Ivania 

Instructor in Business Administration 

William Kokokf. H.S.. New York I niversity; Graduate Work. The 
College of the City of New York 

Instructor in Business Administration 

Marie E. Sommer, A.B., University of North Carolina: M.A., New 
York University 

Instructor in History 

Lola Stevens. B.S., Michigan State Normal School; M.A., Columbia 
University 

Instructor in Music 

Mary E. Sutton. B.A.. University of Georgia 
Instructor in Economics 

Harold E. Thompson. B.S.A., University of Georgia: M.A., University 
of Michigan 

Instructor in Music 

Louis A. Thompson, M.B.A., L.L.B.. University of Georgia 
Instructor in Business Administration 






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Genera] Information 



I hs| OM wi> I >i;i. \m/ \ i n>\ 

Armstrong College <>f Savannah was founded on Ma\ 27. \ ( )'.'>~>. \>\ 
the Mayor and Mdermen of t he Cit) of Savannah to meet a long-felt 
need for a junior college. I In- first college building waa the magnificent 
home of the late George F. Armstrong, a gift to the cit) from his widow 
and Ins daughter. The former home, now called the Armstrong Building, 
ia an imposing structure of Italian Rennaisaance architecture; inside. 

it> spacious rooms and marble halls lend an air of dignity; while out- 
side it is one of the most beautiful college buildinga in the South. 

Over the years, through private donation and public appropriation, 
the campus has been enlarged until now it includes four additional 
buildings: the Lane Building, a gift of the late Mills B. Lane, prominent 
hanker: John W. Hunt Memorial Building in which are located the 
Student Center, the Home Economics Program, the Women's Lounge, 
the Dancing Studio, and the Music Room: Herschel V. Jenkins Hall, 
which contains the auditorium, theater for the Armstrong College 
Masquers, and class rooms; and Thomas Gamhle Hall, site of science 
lecture rooms and laboratories. 

Three of the buildings face forty-acre Forsyth Park, the most beau- 
tiful park in the city: the other two face Monterey Square, one of the 
carefully planned squares for which Savannah is famous. 

Hodgson Hall, across from Forsyth Park on Whitaker Street, con- 
tains the college library as well as the Library of the Georgia Historical 
Societx. to which Armstrong students have access. 

The college is under the control of a commission of six members, 
appointed by the Mayor. In addition, the commission includes as ex- 
officio members the Mayor, the Chairman of the Chatham County Board 
of Education, the Chairman of the County Commissioners, the Super- 
intendent of the Board of Education, and the President of the Savannah 
Chamber of Commerce. 

Except for the war years, enrollment has shown a steady increase. 
At present the total number of students in the day and evening pro- 
grams is approximately six hundred and fift\ . 

Aims 

The college seeks to serve the community b\ giving the men and 
women who attend its classes a better understanding of the world in 



10 ARMSTRONG COLLEGE OF SAVANNAH 

which thr\ live and the experience of adapting knowledge to meet the 
obligations and responsibilities <»f citizenship. 

The student ina\ complete one <>r more of ihe follnuing 
specific objectives: 

1. Complete the freshman and sophomore years of the 
four-year senior college program leading to the bac- 
calaureate degree: 

2. Finish two years of pre-professional work leading to- 
ward medicine, dentistry, law, home economics, the 
ministry and other professions: 

3. Graduate from a semi-professional program, prepared 
to go into business or industry. 

4. Complete the first year of an engineering program 
which is transferable for credit to colleges of en- 
gineering. 

The college awards the degree of Associate in Arts 
to students completing an approved program. 



Admission to the College 
(For dates see calendar on page 2) 

A student planning to enter Armstrong will obtain from the Regis- 
trar an "Application for Admission Card." The student will complete 
and return this form to the Registrar's office. Request the High School 
Principal, or the College Registrar [in the case of a transfer student). 
to send a transcript of credits to the Registrar's Office. Armstrong Col- 
lege of Savannah. Savannah. Georgia. 

Having checked the student's records for compliance with the 
minimum requirements for admission, the Registrar's office will send 
a notice to the student that he has been admitted to the college, together 
with certain physical examination forms which must be completed and 
returned before the student can complete registration. The applicant 
will be notified of the dates of the freshman placement examinations. 
These tests do not affect a students entering Armstrong, but will enable 
the faculty advisers to assist him in selecting a program of study upon 
entrance. Students are required to take these test measurements before 
registration is completed. 



GENERAL INFORMATION II 



Reqi iremen rs For Admission 

There arc two methods of admission t<> Armstrong College: eithei 

h\ certificate or b\ examination. 



B1 CERTIFU Ml 

1. \ candidate for admission to Armstrong College <>f Savannah 
1>\ certificate must be a graduate of an accredited high school with at 
least fifteen units of credit. 

2. No subject-matter units are prescribed. The high school pro- 
gram should be of such nature as to give satisfactory preparation for 
beginning college studies. Subjects which may be expected to con- 
tribute to this end are English composition, literature, natural science, 
history and other social studies, foreign languages, and mathematics. 
The right is reserved to reject any applicant whose high school program 
does not indicate adequate preparation for college work. 

3. A record of high school credits earned by the applicant should 
be made out on the proper forms by an official of the high school and 
mailed directly to the Office of the Registrar. This certificate becomes 
the property of the college and cannot be returned to the applicant. 

4. Three units in mathematics are a pre-requisite for admission 
to the freshman class in engineering. 

BY EXAMINATION 

Students beyond high school age, who do not meet the above 
requirements for admission by certificate, may take the General Edu- 
cational Development tests (high school level). The student will be 
admitted to college on the basis of his score. These tests should be 
completed at least one week before registration. Additional informa- 
tion may be secured from the Registrar's office. 

ADMISSION TO ADVANCED STANDING 

Advanced credit will be allowed for work done in other institu- 
tions of proper rank and standing and in certain cases for training 
received in the Armed Service. Credit toward graduation from transfer 
institutions will be accepted if the student has a general average of 
"C" for all college work completed. To receive a diploma from Arm- 
strong College of Savannah, a student must be in attendance taking a 
normal study load for two quarters, earn a "C" average and. in addi- 
tion, must satisfy the requirements of a particular course of study. 
Adults ( students over 21 years of age ) may receive credit for certain 



12 ARMSTRONG COLLEGE OF SAVANNAH 

college work on the basis of the General Educational Dewlopment 
tests (college level). 

IDMISSIOIS 01 VETERANS 

Armstrong College of Savannah will accept veterans who are not 
high school graduates if their official General Educational Development 
tests show scores that indicate the applicants abilils to do college work. 
A Certificate of Eligibility and Entitlement (VA Form No. 7-1993) ii 
required of every veteran who attends this institution under Public 
Law 550 (Korean Bill I. application for which ma) 1»<' completed at 
the Veterans Administration office in the Blun Building, Savannah, 
Georgia. Immediately upon receipt of certificate from the Veterans 
Administration, the student should contact the college business 'office 
regarding processing of certificate and future monthly reports. 

All veterans attending Armstrong under Public Law 346 must 
present a certificate of eligibility the first time thev register at Arm 
strong College. A veteran who has not obtained a certificate of eligi- 
bility prior to registration will be required to pay cash, which max b • 
refunded by the Business Office upon receipt of the certificate. All 
veterans attending Armstrong under Public Law 550 should be pre- 
pared to pay tuition and fees at time of registration 

ADMISSION OF SPECIAL STUDEIS rS 

Adults who are interested in enrolling in courses for their intrinsic 
value but who do not wish college credit may be enrolled as special 
students. Requirements pertaining to entrance examinations, physical 
examinations, and physical education do not applx to these students. 

TRANSIENT STUDENTS 

A student regularly enrolled in another college may register at 
Armstrong as a transfer student with the permission of his dean or 
advisor. For such a student, entrance requirements are waived. 

FEES 

Tuition will be charged as follows: 
For 12-17 quarter hours — $55.00. 

For each quarter hour less than 12 quarter hours — S4.60. 
For each quarter hour in excess of 17 quarter hours — $4.60. 

Anyone wishing to audit a non-laborator\ course in the day pro 
gram I but not receive college credit) ma\ do so with permission of 
the instructor b\ paying a fee of $10.00 per course. 

\ graduation fee of $7.50 will be collected from each candidate 
for graduation. 



GENER \L INFORM ATION L3 

\n\ Btudenl delinquent in the payment of am fee due tin- college 
will have grade reports ami transcripts »»f record- held up, and will 

not he allowed to reregister at the College for a new quarter until the 

delinquency has been removed. 

Each student leaving Armstrong College is entitled to one official 
transcript of his college work. The charge for additional copies is 

11.00 each. 

\n activit) fee »»f $5.00 each quarter will he charged all da\ stu- 
dent- who are registered for 10 quarter hours or more. This fee i- not 
charged Evening College students unless the) wish to participate in the 
regular activit) program of the college. 

Students taking laboratory work will be required to pa) a fee for 
materials and equipment. This fee is indicated in the description of 
courses found under "Course Descriptions'' elsewhere in this bulletin. 
All absences from announced quizzes must be made up. There is 
a fee of $2.00 for this service, with the following exceptions: 
( 1 I Illness which is certified by a medical doctor. 
(2 1 A death in the family. 

(3) Absences incurred while on official business for the 
college. 
Any student who desires to take more than 18 quarter hours per 
quarter must have the approval of his advisor. 

Refunds of fees and tuition will be made ONLY upon written 
application for withdrawal from school. No refunds will be made to 
students dropping a course. The schedule of refunds is given below: 



First Session, 

Summer Quarter. 1954 



Second Session. 

Summer Quarter. 1954 



Fall Quarter, 1954 



Winter Quarter, 1955 



Spring Quarter, 1955 



REFUND 


SCHEDULE 






WITHDRAW \L 1 


MTK> 




AMOUNT OF REF1 ND 


June 


14. 


15. 


16 




80% of fees 


June 


17. 


13 






60% of fees 


June 


21. 


22. 


23 




40% of fees 


June 


24, 


25 






20% of fees 


Julv 


26, 


27, 


28 




80% of fees 


July 


29, 


30 






60% of fees 


Aug. 


2. 


3. 


4 




407c of fees 


Aug. 


5, 


6 






20% of fees 


Sept 


20, 


21, 


22, 23, 


24 


80% of fee- 


Sept. 


27, 


28, 


29. 30 




60% of fees 


Oct. 


1 








60% of fee- 


Oct. 


4. 


5. 


6 7, 


•8 


40% of fees 


Oct. 


11, 


12, 


13, 14, 


15 


207 o of fees 


Jan. 


3, 


4, 


5. 6, 


■■ 


807c of fees 


Jan. 


10. 


11, 


12, 13, 


14 


60%. of fees 


Jan. 


17. 


18, 


19, 20, 


21 


407c of fees 


Jan. 


24. 


25. 


26. 27, 


28 


20% of fees 


March 


21, 


22, 


23. 24, 


25 


807c of fees 


March 


28, 


29, 


30, 31 




60% of fees 


April 


1 








60% of fees 


April 


4. 


5, 


6, 7, 


8 


40% of fee- 


April 


11. 


12. 


13. 14, 


15 


20% of fees 



14 Mi M> TH ONG COLLEGE OF SAVANNAH 

Okh.n i \ i [on wi> Advisement 

The counseling and advisemenl service of Armstrong College of 
Savannah oiler- help in solving pn»l>liMiis connected with the student's 
college program. 

Students are urged to request help from their Instructors when 
the difficult) is one concerned with the subject itself and having no 
complications. The areas with which the adviser i^ usually concerned 
are choice of vocation, the planning of work in college, stud) habits 
generally and personal adjustment to college life. Those problems which 
do not fit into these general categories either because of greater inten- 
sity or critical developments are referable to community agencies 
outside the college if this is agreeable to the student and his parents 
or guardians. 

During the year 1952-53 the academic advisement of students was 
distributed among the entire faculty so that each instructor carried the 
responsibility for a proportionate number of the entire student body 
registered in the daytime program. Advisement interviews were sched- 
uled with each student at least once a quarter and appointments for 
these interviews were mailed from the office of the President. These 
interviews were designed to aid the student in planning his program of 
work in college. 

Library 

The library of Armstrong College is housed in Hodgson Hall on 
the corner of Gaston and Whitaker Streets. All the materials are read- 
ily available to the students since all books are on open shelves. On 
the main floor is the reference room, with its many volumes of factual 
information. Downstairs is the reading room, a popular and attrac- 
tive meeting place for the students: this room contains fiction, biog- 
raphy and books in foreign languages. In addition the reading room 
contains a radio-phonograph on which the students may hear their 
favorite records. The workroom and office of the Librarian are also 
downstairs. 

The library includes books for general and for recreational read- 
ing. At the present time the library's holdings consist of a standard 
collection of books totaling over 12.000 volumes and an extensive col- 
lection of pamphlets on subjects of current interest. More than 100 
periodicals are received, including five new-papers. In keeping with 
the purpose of the library to meet the needs of all the students, a 
beginning has been made toward a collection of recordings and art 
print-. 



GENERAL INFORMATION L5 



In addition to the resources of the college library the students 
have free access to the holdings of the Georgia Historical Society, 
also housed in Hodgson Hall. This library contains tin- most outstand- 
ing collection of materials on Georgia and it- history as well as a large 
collection of materials on Southern history. The holdings of the His- 
torical Societj consisl of more than L0,000 lx.uk-. 80 periodical sub- 
scriptions, an extensive manuscript collection, and one of the mosl 
complete files of Savannah newspapers, dating back to 1763. 

To further meet their needs, Armstrong students are encouraged 
to use m>t onl\ the materials available in Hodgson Hall, but also the 
Savannah Public Library, which has much material of interest, such 
as its large collection of fiction, government documents, and micro- 
film copies of newspapers. 

Mental Health Clink 

The clinic is an integral part of the Savannah-Chatham Health 
Department, which has as its primary functions the development of a 
community-wide mental health program and the treatment of the emo- 
tional problems of children and adults. 

The personnel at the clinic include the Director, who is a psychi- 
atric social worker, another psychiatric social worker, and a psychol- 
ogist, as well as a psychiatrist who serves as consultant. 

The clinic is located on the ground floor in the Lane Building at 
20 West Gaston Street. 



ARMSTRONG EVENING COLLEGE 

Education, knows no a^e limit. 

For those adults who wish to keep mentally alert; for those who 
are employed by day so must attend college by night; for those who 
wish to obtain a college degree in the evenings; for those who strive 
to master a skill or an art, to add a new field of interest in life: Arm- 
strong keeps its doors open well into the night for any and all of these. 

College credit is given for courses taught in the evening. Students 
may become candidates for the degrees listed elsewhere in this bulletin 
under "Curriculums." 

Students not seeking degrees may enroll in courses on a non-credit 
basis. 

Physical examinations and placement tests are waived as require- 
ments for registration. Physical education is not a degree requirement 
for adults in the evening college. 



16 ARMSTRONG COLLEGE OF SAVANNAH 

It [s possible i<» enroll for three courses on Monday. Wednesday 
and Fridaj between the hours of 6:00 and L0:30 P. M. However, 
students employed during tin- da) arc urged to limit their enrollment 
to <>nc or two courses. Eighteen five-hour courses or the equivalent, 
arc required for graduation. 

The dates for refunds in the case of withdrawal listed in this bul- 
letin arc applicable. When a student is enrolled in more than one 
course, no refund is allowed for dropping a single course. Refunds are 
made onl) in case of withdrawal from the college. 

The cost of tuition, etc., is covered under "fees." Student activity 
fees are not assessed evening college students. Participation in college 
activities is invited . 

Armstrong Evening College as successor to the Savannah branch 
of the University of Georgia Off-Campus Center, began operation in 
June, 1951. During the 1953-54 school year more than 400 students 
enrolled each quarter. Veterans are now attending under Public Laws 
346 (World War II I and 550 ("Korean" veterans). 

Qualified Armed Services personnel, currently on active duty, are 
attending with their tuition partially defrayed by the services. This 
is arranged through the unit education officer of the service affected. 

Quarterly announcements of Evening College courses, instructors. 
etc., may be obtained by addressing requests to The Director. Arm- 
strong Evening College. 447 Bull Street. Savannah. Georgia. 

Senior College Courses 

Through the Extension Division of the University of Georgia. 
Armstrong Evening College offers upper division courses which can 
be taken for credit satisfying junior and senior year requirements for 
the bachelor's degree. A minimum of one year of residence at the 
University is required to receive the bachelor's degree. The equivalent 
of one year of senior college work, however, ma\ he completed through 
extension courses in residence at Armstrong College in certain degree 
programs. Instructors in the extension classes must be approved by 
the heads of the departments at the I Diversity of Georgia. These 
courses then cam I niversit) credit and are recorded in the registrar's 
office at the University of Georgia. They are University of Georgia 
courses taught it] Armstrong Evening College. 

In the pa>t. the courses offered have been the core curriculum 
for the junior year leading toward the Bachelor of Business Adminis- 
tration degree. Vlso, income tax accounting, a second course in busi- 



GEM. K \L INFORMATION 17 

ness law, personnel administration, and other Advanced courses in 
economics and business administration have been offered as Btudent 
«li mand indicated. 

Junior and senior courses leading toward the Bachelor of Vxts 
degree arc offered in English, literature, history, psychology, and soci- 
ology. Oilier courses will be added if sufficient studenl requests warrant. 

Courses required to qualif) for State Department Teacher's cer- 
tificates arc sometimes offered as upper division courses, since local 
teachers arc limited to ninet) quarter hours of credit at the junior 
college level. State Department regulations requiring all courses in 
education to be taught in a teacher-training institution prevenl Arm- 
strong College from offering an) such courses for credit. 

Audio-Visi \i. 1 \si i;i < Hon 

Certain classrooms of the college are equipped with screens for 
the showing of films. In the teaching of English, public speaking, for- 
eign languages and music, visual aids are supplemented by recordings. 

Homecoming and Open House 

A Homecoming program is held each year at the end of the Fall 
quarter in December. This includes a parade, a reception, a basketball 
game and a dance. All alumni, students and their friends are invited 
to attend. 

During the Spring quarter the college is open to the general public 
for inspection during its annual Open House. Exhibits are prepared 
by the students and faculty members in the various classes which are 
representative of the work done at Armstrong. All visitors are invited 
to tour the buildings and grounds and to attend a social hour arranged 
l>\ the home economics students. 

Student Assistants 

The college employs a number of student assistants each year. 
These students work in the library, science laboratories, business offices 
and with the faculty. Those who desire such employment should apply 
to the staff member who is in charge of the work in which he is 
interested or to the President of the college. 

Scholarships 

The scholarships which are available to students are listed below. 
Application blanks may be secured from the President's office in the 
Armstrong Building. Those who wish to appl) for scholarships for 



18 ARMSTRONG COLLEGE OF SAVANNAH 

the school year beginning in September should file an application in 
the President's office nol later than Jul) L5. All applicants are required 
to appear before an oral interview board during the month of August. 
Each applicant will be notified when to appear for this interview. 

< omtaission Scholarships 8 for $100.00 each 
< Tin- i- a work scholarship » 

\ 1 1 h u i Lucas Scholarships 5 for $100.00 each 

Junior Chamber of Commerce 2 for $100700 each 

Edward McGuire Gordon Scholarship 1 for $200.00 (Men only I 

Savannah Gas Co. Engineering 1 for $100.00 (Men only) 

Savannah Gas Co. Home Economics 2 for $100.00 each 

Friedman's Jewelers Scholarships 10 for $100.00 each 

Placement Service 

The college maintains a placement service for the benefit of em- 
ployers and students. Anyone seeking part-time employment while in 
college, or full-time employment after leaving college, should place his 
name on file with the Business Office. 



Commencement Exercises 

Commencement exercises are held each year in June. At this time 
the degree of Associate in Arts is awarded to those students who have 
met the requirements for graduation. At this time recognition is given 
to those who qualify for scholastic honors. The Faculty and Graduates 
participate in full academic dress . 

Student Center 

The college does not operate a boarding department. The Student 
Center in the Hunt Building is open throughout the day and provides 
light lunches at reasonable prices. The Center also provides recreational 
facilities and houses the Book Store. 



Student Activities 

The entire program of student activities at the college is designed 
to contribute to the development of the whole individual and to assist 
him in becoming an active and helpful member of the community. 
The college feels that students should take the responsibility for direct- 
ing their own affairs. The senate is the governing student board of 
Armstrong College. This organization is made up of elected representa- 
tives of all student groups. It is the function of the Senate to co- 
ordinate, direct and control student organizations and activities at 
Armstrong. 



Gl \l R \l l\l ORM \TI<>\ L9 



\ i in i 1 1< - 

Basketball is the onl) -purl in which the college fields an inter- 
collegiate team. Ml other sports at the college are on an intramural 
basis 



Physh m Liu < vi ion Progb \m 

Ml regular da) students, excepl veterans, are required to partici- 
pate in a physical education program. Intramural competition is offered 
in such sports as basketball, volleyball, swimming, football, tennis, 
Softball and pingpong. Ml arc encouraged to take pari in this program. 

Publications 

The college publishes the Inkwell, a newspaper; the Mercur\. a 

magazine; and the 'Geechee, a yearbook. These afford students an 
opportunity to express their opinions on a wide variety of topics, to do 
creative writing and gain practice in other journalistic activities. 

The Armstrong College Masquers 

The Armstrong College Masquers, wth a charter membership of 
over seventy students, was organized in the Fall of 1950, after the 
Savannah Playhouse separated from Armstrong College and was reor- 
ganized as The Little Theatre, Inc. 

The Masquer organization's goal is to furnish enjoyment and appre- 
ciation of the drama for both participants and spectators through a 
balanced presentation of popular and classic theatre. 

Masquer membership is open to all students interested in any phase 
of the theatre: acting, designing, lighting, make-up, costuming, and 
other production skills. 

An affiliate of the Masquers is the Armstrong Radio Workshop, 
formed to offer interested students an opportunity l<> develop techniques 
of radio broadcasting. 

Glee Cli b 

The Armstrong Glee Club was organized in September, 1949. Its 
members are drawn from the student body and faculty. Besides giving 
two complete concerts at the college, one at Christmas and one in the 
Spring, the group has sung for many civic clubs in Savannah. 

Rehearsals of one hour duration are held three times a week. 
Membership is open to all interested student-. 



General Regulations 

Advisement ind Placement Tests 

To help a student select a definite objective earl) In his college 
program, the Armstrong staff administers to each entering freshman 
a series of interest, aptitude, and achievement tests. In the Fall, these 
are given during Freshman Week and are scored prior to the student's 
interview with an adviser. On the basis of these objective measure- 
ments, the student's previous record, his interest and his family coun- 
sel, the student with the aid of his adviser decides on a program of 
sludv which will enable him to accomplish his purpose. 

Physical Examinations 

Each day school student must submit a completed physical exami- 
nation report on the forms furnished by the college before he can 
complete his registration. A chest X-ray is also required. On the basis 
of the examinations, the physical education director will adapt a pro- 
gram of training and recreation to individual requirements. This regu- 
lation is not applicable to students enrolled in the Evening College. 

Course Load 

The unit of work for a regular student is 16-17 quarter hours per 
quarter. A normal schedule of sixteen quarter hours presupposes that 
the average student will devote approximate!) fortv-eight hours per 
week to his college classes and to his preparation therefor. 

Except in engineering, permission to enroll for more than 17 quar- 
ter hours will be granted only to students who have a "B" average for 
the preceding quarter. The quarter just prior to graduation, a student 
may take an extra course w r hich is necessary to meet requirements for 
graduation. No student will be allowed to register for more than 21 
hours in any one quarter. 

Admission to Class 

Students will be admitted to class when the instructor is furnished 
an official class card indicating that he has completed his registration 
and paid his fees in the Business Office. 

Conduct 

Compliance with the regulations of the faculty and the Armstrong 
College Commission is assumed. The use on the campus of intoxicat- 
ing beverages, gambling, and hazing are prohibited. 





Reports 


are based on the f 


\ plus 

\ 

B 

C 

1) 
E 


Exceptional 
Excellent 

Good 
Fair 
Poor 
Incomplete 


F 
W 

\\ F 




Failure 
Withdrew 
Withdrew Failing 



GENERAL REG! LATIONS 21 



Id POH I S \M» ( rRADES 

It is felt l>\ Armstrong thai students in college should be held 
accountable for their own scholarship. Accordingly, report cards, warn- 
ings of deficient scholarship and other Buch notices are not sent out 
to parent- or guardians l>\ ihe college except on request. Instead the 
students themselves receive these reports and are expected to contact 
their advisers whenever their work is unsatisfactory. Report cards are 
issued at the end <»f each quarter. Reports <»f failing grades are issued 
in the middle of each quarter. Each studenl has access to an adviser 
and in addition, the Registrar, and all instructor- arc available t<> help 
and advise an\ studenl set king assistance. 

ollowing system of grading: 

1 honor points pel quarter how 

3 honor points per quarter hour 

2 honor points per quarter hour 
1 honor point per quarter hour 
\<> honor points per quarter hour 
incomplete must be removed before 

mil term of the following quart* i 
Course must be repeated 
Course must be repeated 
I Course must be repeated 

A student who receives an "'E ,: I incomplete grade l should con- 
sult his instructor at once and arrange to complete the requirements 
of the course. An "E" grade which has not been removed by the mid- 
dle of the succeeding quarter automatically becomes an "F." \n "E" 
grade becomes an "F" if the course is repeated. 

Honors 

Students who have been in attendance for three consecutive quar- 
ters taking a normal load and achieving an average grade of "B" or 
better with no grade below that of "C" will be placed on the Perma- 
nent Dean's List. This list is published each June in the commencement 
program. 

Graduates who meet the requirements for the Permanent Deans 
List and who are graduating with an average of three honor points 
per quarter hour, will be designated as graduating summa cum laude 
I with highest distinction). The designation cum laude I with distinc- 
tion ) will be bestowed upon those meeting the above requirements 
with an average of two honor points per quarter hour. 

A valedictorian will be selected by the graduating class from the 
five students with the highest scholastic averages in the work com- 
pleted before the term in which the students graduate. 



22 ARM^ [RONG COLLEGE OF SAVANNAH 

Students who make a grade ol "B M <>r better in each course during 
a ii \ quarter mrill be placed on the Dean's Scholastic Attainment List 

\ i 1 1 \i>\\< i. 

Students arc expected to attend classes a- -cheduled. Any absence. 
whatsoever, from diss work entails a 1<>>> to the student. 

\ studenl wrho ha- been absent from class for a valid reason should 
have the absence excused with a written statement to his instructor who 
will initial it. The student will then file this form in the Registrar's 
office. Excuses must be submitted within seven days from the date the 
student returns to school: otherwise the absence will not be excused. 

\ student who has unexcused absences equal in number to the times 
the class meets in one week, and has one additional unexcused absence, 
will be dropped from class. The instructors will notify the Registrars 
office when a student should be dropped. The Registrar's office will 
notify the student. Grades assigned to those who have been dropped 
will either be W or \\ 1 . depending on the status of the student at 
the time he is dropped from class. 

Attendance at bi-weekly assemblies is required. 

Withdrawal- 

A formal withdrawal, presented to the President in writing, is a 
pre-requisite for honorable dismissal from, or re-entrance into, this 
institution. \n\ >tudent planning to withdraw should immediately make 
such intentions known to the administration of the college in writing. 
This notice is required to receive any authorized refunds. 

In order that a student may not receive a failing grade on his 
permanent record card in the Registrar's office, he should formally 
withdraw from any class which he discontinues by securing the in- 
structor's written approval. This written approval should be filed in 
the Registrar's office. 

REyiiRKMhvrs For GRADUATION 

The requirements for graduation from Armstrong College of Sa- 
\annah are listed below: 

1. The student will complete a program of studv listed under 
"ClRRICl LI MS" with an average grade of "C." Am 
exceptions to a program ma\ be referred by a student's 
advi-or to the Committee on Academic Standing. 



GENERAL REGULATIONS 

2. One-third <>f i h«- work required for graduation will l><- 
completed at Vrmstrong College «>f Savannah 

3. Not more than oue-fourth of tin- t«»tal work required for 
graduation will consist of correspondence course credit 

and credit for \rincd Services Experience. 

Candidates for graduation will make application in the Registrar- 
office two quarters prior to the expected date of graduation 

Recommendations 

The recommendations issued 1>\ the college are based on tin- 
grades the student earns, his student activity record, and the opinions 
expressed by his instructors on a special student rating form. 

The files of the Registrar s office which include all permanent 
records are consulted regularly by representatives of the Federal Bu- 
reau of Investigation, the Civil Service, the local Credit Bureau and 
other agencies having access to confidential records. A good college 
record is of vital importance to a student. 



Curriculums 



General 

Before registration, the student should FLAN A PROGRAM OF 
5T1 \)\ W ITU \\ \DVISER. Even if a student knows what courses 
are required for graduation, he should have on record in the office of 
lii- adviser a cop) of his program. In order for a student to make any 
changes in his planned program he must consult his adviser. The 
.id\ iser and the Registrar will check a student's program and it will be 
approved two quarters prior to the expected date of graduation. 

The Associate of Arts degree is conferred upon all students who 
complete at Armstrong College of Savannah one of the programs out- 
lined in the catalog. 

If a student plans to transfer to another institution either before 
or after graduation it is essential that he determine what courses must 
be completed at Armstrong in order to conform with the degree re- 
quirements of the institution to which he wishes to transfer. 



The Core Curriculum 

There are certain bodies of knowledge and certain skills indispen- 
sable to every college trained man and woman. The understanding of 
one's environment and man's struggle to adapt it to useful ends, the 
ability to communicate his thoughts and feelings: right group-attitudes 
and coordinated physical activity — these objectives are set up in the 
following courses required of all students desiring to graduate. 

Freshman year: English 11-12-13: History 11-12-13: ten quarter 
hours of natural sciences, and Physical Education 11-12-13. 

Sophomore year: Sophomore English and three quarters of 
physical education. Students enrolled in certain terminal courses 
described below ma\ substitute English 20 and English 28 for English 
21 and 22. 

Students graduating in less than the six quarters of the regular 
session may reduce their physical education requirements accordingly. 
Physical education should be taken in the proper sequence and two 
courses should not be scheduled in any one quarter. 



ci innci 1. 1 MS 






\ssoci Ml. l\ UtTS DEGREE 



C.ON< I \ I KM ION 

Bi siness Administration* 

FlRSI ^ i \i; 

English 11. 12. 13 Freshman English 9 
Histon 11. 12. 13 Western 

Civilization ( > 

Physical Education 11. 12. is 3 

Laboratory Science 10 

Mathematics 16 College Mgebra ."> 

Mathematics 19 —Finance 3 

Electives 9 



Si NIOR COLLECl PREPAR tTOM 

Si i OND > » E \i; 
English 21. 22 Sophomon 

English 10 

l'li\ sical Education 3 

Business Administration 21. 25 

Accounting Hi 

Economics 21. 24 Principles and 

Problems I" 

Political Science 13 Govt, of I . S. 5 
Electives .10 



TOTAL 48 TOTAL 48 

* A student should consult the catalog of his prospective senior college f«n 

required subjects. Colleges differ as to what subjects are required for this 



Concentration — Business Administration 



Term in \i. 



Many students will not continue their formal education after 
leaving Armstrong. To these students the college gives the opportunity 
to select those subjects which have a vocational value. Sufficient 
general education is included in the core curriculum to make this a 
well-rounded program. 



First Year 
English 11, 12, 13 — Freshman 

English 9 

History 11. 12, 13— Western 

Civilization 9 

Physical Education 11. 12, 13 3 

Natural Science 10 

Economics 21. 24 — Principles 

and Problems 10 

Electives 7 



Second Year 
English 21, 22 — Sophomore English 

or English 20. 28 10 

Physical Education 3 

Business Administration 24, 25 

Accounting 10 

Business Administration 27 — 

Business Law 5 

Commerce Electives: 10 

Typing 

Calculator and Comptometer 

Shorthand 

Business Administration 26 — 
Intermediate Acct. 

Business Administration 28 — 
Business Law 
Electives (other) 10 



TOTAL 48 



TOTAL 



18 



Concentration — Transportation 



Terminal 



As a communications center. Savannah offers many opportunities 
to students trained in transportation and traffic management. A lay 



26 ARMSTRONG COLLEGE OF SAVANNAH 

committee from business, industry, the railroad? and truck lines drew 
up tin- follow ing program. 

Business Administration 151 — Freight Rai< - and Tariff- 5 

Business Administration 152 — Motor Carrier Kate- (elementary) 5 

Business Administration 153 Advanced Freight Kate- ami Tariff- 5 

Business Administration 154 — Motor Carrier Rates (advanced) 3 

Busine— Administration 155 — Interstate Commerce Law 5 

Economics 121 and 124 — Principles and Problems 10 

English 111-112-113— English Composition 9 

English 120 and 128 10 

History lllx. 112y — Survey of Western Civilization 10 

Natural or Laboratory Science 10 

Electives 17 

91 



Com i \ [ration — Science Senior College Preparatory 

This course of study is designed for those students who wish to 
major in the fields of Biology. Chemistry. Physics or Mathematics. At 
the time of registration the student must specify his major field, and 
it will he indicated at the time of graduation on the permanent record 
cards. The major of Biology will include the fields of Pre-Medicine. 
Pre-Dentistry. Pre-Pharmacy and Medical Technology." 

This program is so constructed that only slight variations are 
necessary to prepare a student for his particular major and it is the 
responsibility of each student to see that his program of study conforms 
to his senior college requirements. A minimum of 96 quarter hours 



is required for graduat 



ion. 



First Year Second Year 

English 11. 12. 13 — Freshman English 21, 22 — Sophomore 

English 9 English 10 

Historv 11. 12. 13— Western Phvsical Education 3 

Civilization 9 *Phy>ies 11. 12— General 12 

Physical Education 11. 12, 13 3 *French or German 10 

Mathematics 16 — College Algebra.. 5 Electives and Major Requirements.. 

* Mathematics 17 — Trigonometry 5 
Elective and Major Requirements.. 

The ahove courses are required of all students I except as noted) 
enrolling in this concentration. 



CI RRIC1 I.I MS 



27 



M UOR Rl Ql [Rl Ml NTS: 

M.i jor in Biology : 
Biolog] 14, 15 I •< tici al Zoolog] 
Biology 23 ( iomparative V etebrate 

\n.ituin\ 

( hemistrj 1 1. 15 General 
Chemistry 24 Qualitative Analysis 
Chemistry 25 Quantitative Analysis 
Major in Mathematics: 
Mathematics L8 Plane Analytic 

Geometry 

( hemistrj oi Biology I 10 hrs. 
minimum > 



Majoi in ( hemisti j \ 
( hi mi-ii \ I I 15 I General ( hemisti j 
Chemistry 21 Qualitative taalysii 

< hemisti j 25 Quantitative \nal\ bu 
Mathematics 18 Plane Analytic 

Geometi j 
Major in Physics: 
Mathematics L8 Plain- Analytic 

< reometry 

Chemistry or Biology I l<> hrs. 
minimum) 



* Students pursuing a terminal course in Medical Technology may substitute 
in certain case-, courses recommended by the American Society oi Clinical 
Pathologists. 



Concentration — Commerce Secretarial 



Terminal 



This program is designed to meet the needs of those students who 
wish to qualify for clerical positions in business. 



First Yeah 
English 11, 12. 13— Freshman 

English 9 

History 11, 12, 13— Western 

Civilization 9 

Physical Education 11, 12, 13 3 

Natural Science 10 

Commerce 11 a-b-c — Typing 6 

Commerce 12 a-b-c — Shorthand 15 



Second Year 

Business Administration 24 

24 — Accounting 5 

^English 20 — Composition 5 

Commerce 17 — Office Practice 5 

Commerce 21 a-b-c — Typing 6 

Commerce 22 a b-c — Shorthand ... 15 

♦English 28— Public Speaking 5 

Physical Education 3 



Total 52 TOTAL 44 

* English 21, 22 may be substituted for these English courses. 

Concentration — Home Economics Senior College Preparatory 



First Year 
English 11. 12, 13— Freshman English 9 
History 11, 12, 13— Western 

Civilization 9 

Physical Education 11, 12, 13 3 

Home Economics 10a — Orientation: 

Careers 3 

Home Economics 10b — Orientation: 

Personal Development 3 

Home Economics 11 — Clothing .... 5 

Art 11 — Creative 5 

Laboratory Science 10 

TOTAL 47 



Second Year 

English 21. 22— Sophomore English 10 

Physical Education 3 

Home Economics 12 — Family Meal 

Planning and Serving 5 

Home Economics 21— Home Planning 

and Decorating 5 

Home Economics 24 — Family 

Fundamentals 5 

Social Studies 10 

Science Electives .6 

Mathematics 10 or 16 5 

TOTAL 49 



28 



ARMSTRONG COLLEGE OF SAVANIN Ml 



CoN< ENTRATION HOME 1\» ONOMI4 - 



Termiin \l. 



This course is designed to meel ihe needs oi those women who plan 
to complete their college \\<>rk at Armstrong. Sufficient electives are 
allowed t<> enable the studenl t<« -elect commerce Bubjects which have 
a vocational value <>r cultural subjects for worth) use of leisure time. 



First Yeah 
English 11. 12. 13— Freshman English 9 
History 11, 12. 13— Western 

Civilization 9 

Physical Education .3 

Natural Science 10 

• Human Biology included) 
Home Economics 101) — Orientation: 

Personal Development 3 

Home Economics 11 — Clothing 5 

Psychology 21 — Introductory 5 

Elective 4 

TOTAL 48 



Si ' OND YEA* 

English 21. 22 — Sophomore English 10 
Ph> -ical Education . 3 

Home Economics 21 — Home Planning 

and Decorating 5 

Home Economics 24— Famil) 

Fundamental- 5 

Home Economics 12— Family Meal 

Planning and Serving 
Electi\.- 20 



TOTAL 



18 



Concentration — Physical Education Senior College Preparatory 

The Physical Education Department is qualified to provide the 
first two years of preparation for a major in the field of health and 
physical education for those students planning to enter the field of 
physical education or supervised recreation. 



First Year 
English 11. 12. 13— Freshman Endish 9 
History 11. 12. 13— Western 

Civilization 9 

Physical Education 11. 12. 13 3 

* Mathematics 10 

::: Mathematics 16 — College Algebra 

:: Mathematics 17 — Trigonometry. .10 

Physics or Chemi-try 12 

Home Economics In — Nutrition 4 

Elective* 3 



TOTAL 



50 



Second i ear 
English 21 22 — Sophomore English 10 

Physical Education . 3 
Anatomv and Phvsiologv 

In. 2n. 3n 9 
: * Physical Education 23 — Senior 

Life Sa\ing and Swimming 2 
Physical Education 14 — 

Officiating of Basketball 2 

Psychology 21 — Introductorv 5 

Psychologj 23— Child 5 
Sociology 21 — Marriage and 

the Family 5 

Electives 5 

TOTAL 46 



: The- student may take either 
Mathematics 16 and Mathematic- 17. 



**The student i< exempt from this COUI 
Senior Life Saving certificate 



Mathematics 10 and Mathematics 16 or 
provided he has a Red Cross 



( I RRIC1 1. 1 MS 



Concentration Liberal ^rts Senior Collegi Preparatory 

I his program is recommended foi candidates for an \. B, degree, 
pre-education, pre-law, pre ministerial, journalism, and other pre 

professional concentration-. 

Fntsi V i \i; Second Yi in 

English 11. 12, 13 Freshman English 9 English 21, 22 Sophomore English LO 
Histon 11. 12, 13 Western Physical Education 3 

Civilization 9 Two of the following courses: 10 

Physical Education 11. 12. 13 3 History 25 Recent European 

Laboratory Science 10 Political Science I > Gov't <>f I . S. 

Mathematics 16 College \lgebra 5 Psychology 21 Introductory 

Mathematics 17 Trigonometry 5 Sociology 20 Introductory 

*Foreign Language 10 Economics 21 Principles 

Science 10 

Electives 12 

TOTAL 51 TOTAL 45 

* A student applying for admission to a senior college which doc- not require 
the amount indicated of this subject may. with the approval of hi- adviser, Bub 
stitute other courses required by the senior institution during his first two years. 



Concentration — Liberal Arts Terminal 

A student in the Liberal Arts, Terminal program may select the 
remainder of his electives from courses offered by the college in order 
to prepare for a vocation or to pursue a special interest. 

First Year Second Yeah 

English 11. 12, 13 — Freshman English 9 English 21. 22 — Sophomore English 10 

History 11, 12, 13 — Western Physical Education 3 

Civilization 9 * Elect ives 35 

Physical Education 11, 12, 13 3 

Natural Science 10 

Mathematics 10 or 16 5 

•Electives 12 

TOTAL 48 TOTAL 48 

* A student must elect 20 hours from at least three of the following de- 
partments: Foreign Language, Political Science, Economics, Fine irts, Home 
Economics. Psychology. Sociology. Mathematics (other than Math. 19). 



One Year Programs 

Concentration — Business Administration 

A one year program in Business Administration with emphasis on 
business courses for those persons who may not wish to complete the 



30 ARMSTRONG C OLLEGE OF SAVANNAH 

two year concentration. \ certificate will be awarded t<> those \sh<> 
successful!) complete the program. 

Business Administration 24, 25, 26 15 

Economics 21, 24 . . .10 

Business Administration 27 5 

English 5 

Mathematics 5 

Physical Education 3 

Elective 5 

TOTAL .48 



Concentration — Transportation 

Students who wish a thorough background in transportation may 
receive a one-year certificate upon satisfactory completion of this 
program. 

Business Administration 151 — Freight Rates and Tariffs 5 

Business Administration 152 — Motor Carrier Rates (elementary) 5 

Business Administration 153 — Advanced Freight Rates and Tariffs 5 

Business Administration 154 — Motor Carrier Rates (advanced) 5 

Business Administration 155 — Interstate Commerce Law 5 

Economics 121 and 124 — Principles and Problems 10 

English 111-112-113— English Composition 9 

or 

English 120 and 128 10 

Elective 5 

TOTAL 49 or 50 



Concentration — Engineering Senior College Preparatory 

This program will satisfy degree requirements for the first year 
of most types of engineering but should be varied for certain degrees 
such as chemical, electrical, etc. The student should obtain a catalog 
from the senior college he plans to attend and check this program 
against the requirements. The courses required for the freshman 
year have been worked out in consultation with the Georgia Institute 
of Technology. A certificate will be awarded to those who successfully 
complete the program. 

Chemistry 14. 15— General 12 

English 11, 12. 13— Freshman 9 

Engineering 11. 12 — Drawing 6 

Engineering V) Descriptive Geometrj 3 

History 11. 12. 13 — Western Civilization (or Modern Language) 9 

Mathematics 16, 17. 18 College Ugebra, Trigonometry and 

Analytic Geometrj 15 

Physical Education 11, 12. 13 3 

TOTAL 57 



CI RRIC1 II MS 31 



CON< IN rB \ HON M I \oi.K \IMIM 

\ Btudent who has onl) <>nc year i<> Bpend in college mas herein 



a cm 



poire some of the skills which will enable him i<> earn a livelihood. 



Commerce 1 1 a, 1>. c Typing 6 

Commerce 12 a. I>. c Shorthand 15 

Commerce 17 Office Practice 5 

Business Administration 2 J Accounting 5 

English 20 Composition 5 

English 28 Public Speaking 5 

•Physical Education 11,12,13 3 

Electives 5 

TOTAL 49 

* Physical Education is required in all one year terminal programs if a 
certificate i- desired. 



Concentration — N ursing 

Armstrong College offers the following courses in cooperation with 
the Warren A. Candler School of Nursing. With the permission of the 
instructor and the approval of the student's adviser, a student not en- 
rolled in the School of Nursing may take any of the following courses: 

Anatomy and Physiology In, 2n, 3n 9 

Chemistry In 5 

Sociology In 5 

Physical Education In 1 

Bacteriology In, 2n 6 

Home Economics In 4 

Psychology In 5 

TOTAL 35 



Course Descriptions 

I .1 \i i; \i. 

Armstrong College reserves the right to tl» withdraw am course 
for which less than ten students register, (2) limit the enrollment in 

an) course or class section. (3) fix the time of meeting of all classes 
and sections, and | 1 i offer such additional courses a- demand and 
staff personnel warrant. 

No credit will be given in beginning courses in commerce and 
languages where the same or similar courses have been presented for 
admission from high school. 

Where two or more courses are listed under one description, no 
credit for graduation will be given until the sequence is completed. 

Courses which are offered in the day program are assigned a num- 
ber which is less than 100. All Evening College courses are numbered 
above 100. In course descriptions this number appears in parentheses. 
After each course name, there are three numbers in parentheses. The 
first number listed is the number of hours of lecture: the second, the 
number of hours of laboratory and the third, the number of quarter 
hours of credit the course carries. For example: Biology 16-17 (116- 
117) Human Biology (5-0-5). 

ART 

Art 11 — Creative Art 12-6-5). Spring. 

Draw ing, art principles and design with work in other media at the 
discretion of the instructor. Some application will be made to poster- 
making, lettering and everyday life needs. 

Art 113 — Ceramics (5-0-5). Each quarter. Laboratory fee. $2.00. 

A beginners course. Instruction is concerned with learning to 
handle clay, to form pottery and sculpture, and to decorate, glaze and 
fire the pieces made. 

Art 114 — Ceramics and Sculpture I 5-0-5 I . Even quarter. Labora- 
tory fee. $2.00. 

Instruction in methods of working with cla\ and glazes, plaster 
of paris and other materials. The creative approach to design in 
potter) and sculpture is emphasized. 

Art 115 — Drawing and Painting (5-0-5). Laboratory fee. $2.00. 

A course in the element- of pictorial composition, drawing and 
color. Basic work and experimentation will be conducted from -till 



C01 RSE DESCRIPTIONS 



life, natural Forms, and li\in<; models. Combined with 1 1 1 * - studio 
work will be discussions and reviews In Kistor) and •appreciation <»f art. 

During latter course sessions, efforts will be made to provide 
special Instruction t<> Btudents desiring particular information on tech- 
niques and methods. 

/// L15-a-6 Drawing and Painting (3-0-3). Summer. Labora- 
tory Pee, $2.00. 

\ course in the elements of pictorial composition, drawing and 

color. Basic work and experimentation will he conducted from still 
life, natural forms, and living models. Combined with the studio 
work will be discussions and reviews in history and appreciation of art. 

During the latter course sessions, efforts will be made to provide 
special instruction to students desiring particular information on tech- 
niques and methods. 

Art 116 — Drawing and Painting (5-0-5 I. Laboratory fee, $2.00. 

A continuation of Art 115. 

BIOLOGY 

Anatomy and Physiology \n-2n-'S>n* (2-2-3). Fall. Winter and 
Spring. Laboratory fee, S2.50. 

A three quar'er course in human anatomy and physiology. The 
gross anatomy, some histology and physiology of the organ systems are 
presented in order to give the student an understanding of the human 
body as a basis for further studies in clinical nursing. The labora- 
tory work includes some dissection of the lower vetebrates and ele- 
mentary experiments in physiology. 

Biology U-A (114r A)— General Zoology (3-4-5!. Fall and Win- 
ter. Laboratory fee. S3. 50. 

Biology 14-fi — General Zoology ( 3-6-6 1 . Fall and Winter. Lab- 
oratory fee. S3. 50. 

Introduction to animal structures and function and a survey of 
the invertebrate phyla. Laboratory work on representative species of 
each phylum. 

Biology 15-/1 (115-^) — General Zoology (3-4-5). Winter and 
Spring. Laboratory fee. 83.50. Prerequisite: Biology 14. 

Biology lo-B — General Zoology (36-6). Winter and Spring. Lab- 
oratory fee, $3.50. Prerequisite: Biology 14. 



;i ARMSTRONG COLLEGE OF SWANNAH 



Stud) of vetebrate structure and function, using selected verte- 
brate material for laboratory dissection. (Concludes with a stud) <»f the 
principles of Evolution and Genetics. 

Biology 16-17 (116 117) — Human Biology (5-0-5). Winter and 
Spring. 

This is a two quarter program designed for terminal students. 
Man\ colleges require a non-laboratory science for graduation and this 
course is designed to meet this requirement. It begins with a survey 
of the basic biological principles and continues with a study of the 
structure and function of the human body. The second quarter is 
primarily concerned with the principles of evolution and genetics. 

Biology 22 — Invertebrate Zoology ( 3-6-6 j. Spring. Laboraton 
fee, $5.00. Prerequisite: Biology 14 and 15. 

A concentrated study of the structure and function of invertebrates 
including their economic relation to man. Field trips included for nat- 
ural habitat study. 

Biology 23 — Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy (3-6-6). Fall. 
Laboratory fee, $5.00. Prerequisite: Biology 14 and 15. 

A study of the anatomy and evolution of the organ systems of the 
vertebrates. Laboratory work on Squalus, Necturus and the cat. 

Bacteriology ln-2n* (2-2-3). Winter and Spring. Laboratory fee. 
$2.50. 

An introduction to micro-organisms as living organisms and as 
pathogens. The structure, life history and public health importance of 
representative viruses, bacteria, molds, protozoa and helminthes are con- 
sidered. The laboratory work includes the techniques of culturing bac- 
teria and the study of the scientific basis of antiseptic and aseptic- 
procedures. 

Biology 111 — General Botany Procedures (5-0-5). Summer. 

Study of the basic concepts in relation to all living plant organisms. 

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

Business Administration 24 — Principles of Accounting. Intro- 
ductory (5-0-5). 

An introduction to the fundamental principles and procedures of 
accounting, including a stud) of the journal, the ledger, accounting 
statements, controlling accounts, special journals and the accounting 
system. 

Business Administration 124-a — Principles of Accounting, Intro- 
ductory (3-0-3). Summer only. (B. A. 124-a and B. A. 124-6 are 
identical to Business Administration 24 (124). 






col RSE DESCRIF1 IONS 



\n introduction to the fundamental principles and procedures 
of accounting, including a stud) <>f tin- journal, tli<- ledger, accounting 
statements, controlling accounts, Bpecial journals and tin- accounting 
-\ Btem. 

Business idministration 121-/; -Principles of iccounting, Intro- 
ductory I 3-0-3 I • Summer <>nl\ . 

Continuation of Business Administration 121^. 

Business Administration 25 — Principles of Accounting, Intro- 
ductory (5-0-5). Winter. Prerequisite: Business Administration 24. 

\n application of accounting principles to certain problems such 
as the proprietorship, the partnership, the corporation, departmental 
operations, manufacturing accounts and the analysis of accounting 
statements. 

Business Administration 125-rt — Principles of Accounting, Intro- 
ductory (3-0-3). Summer only. (Business Administration 125-A and 
Business Administration 125-6 are identical to Business Administration 
25 (125). 

An application of accounting principles to certain problems such 
as the proprietorship, the partnership, the corporation, departmental 
operations, manufacturing accounts and the analysis of accounting 
statements. 

Business Administration 125-6 — Principles of Accounting, Intro- 
ductory (3-0-3). Summer only. 

Continuation of Business Administration 125 -a. 
Business Administration 34. — Principles of Accounting, Interme- 
diate (5-0-5). Spring. Prerequisite: Business Administration 25. 

Basic accounting theory with emphasis on the various forms of 
business organization, assets, liabilities and reserves. 

Business Administration 27 (127) — Business Law (5-0-5). Win 
ter. 

Contracts: offer and acceptance, consideration, performance, rights 
of third parties and discharge. Agency: creation of an agency, liabilities 
of principal and agent. Negotiable instruments: elements of negotia- 
bility, endorsement and transfer, liabilities of parties, discharge. 



*These courses are transferrablc to senior colleges toward a B. S. 
Nursing. 



36 ARMSTRONG COLLEGE OF SAVANNAH 

Prerequisite: Business Administration 27. 

Business idministration 2!) (128) — Business Lau (5-0-5). Spring. 

Partnership: formation, powers, liabilities of partners, termination. 
Corporation: formation, powers, rights of security holders, types of 
securities. Sales: Nesting; of title, warrants, remedies. 

Business Administration L15 — Business Correspondence i 5-0-5 I. 
Fall. 

A stud) of business correspondence, letters, information reports. 
follow-up sales programs, statistical analysis and inter-office communi- 
cations. Stress is placed upon the mastery of fundamentals of clear 
w riting. 

Business Administration 129 — Cost Accounting I 5-0-5 I. Spring. 
Prerequisite: Business Administration 125. 

Methods of determining and distributing costs in manufacturing 
and other concerns, stressing the securing of unit costs under both 
the order and the process methods. 

Business Administration 131 — Retail Advertising and Sales Pro- 
motion (5-0-5). 

A course in retail advertising and sales promotion basically con- 
cerned with selling in the retail fields — emphasizing the psychology 
of advertising as a branch of sales. The course explores the various 
media and culminates with direct sales approaches. Primarily an 
advertising course, it can be easily tailored to meet the needs of the 
average salesman. 

Business Administration 132-a-b — Salesmanship (3-0-31. 

A course covering the essential principles of the selling functions. 
It includes the preparation for the interview as well as presentation 
of the canvass. Methods of the approach of the prospect are given 
attention. 

Business Administration 141 — 50 hours of Intensive Review of 
Accounting Principles and Theory. (Non-Credit). 

Special interest is given to certain problems and questions which 
have been used in past examinations of the American Institute of 
Accountants. 

Business Administration 142 — 50 hours of Accounting Theory and 
Practice, i Non-Credit I . 

A continuation of Business Administration 141. 



COl RSE DESCRIPTIONS 



Business [administration L43 inditing Theory. (Non-Credit). 
(50 hours of instruction.) V review «>l auditing theor) and practice. 

Business Administration I II Business Lau (Non Credit). 

(50 hours of instruction.) \ stud) <>f business law with emphasis 
on the American Institute of Vccountants' Examination Questions on 

Business Lau 

Business Administration 151 — Classification o) Freight (5-0-5). 

The histor) of transportation rate structures, the construction of 

rate structures, the form of publishing rates; including the field of 
commercial transportation from the viewpoint of shipper, railroad, 
motor carriers, and water carriers. 

Business Administration 152 — Motor Carrier Rates (5-0-5). 

The cost of and the understanding of the freight rate tariffs. This 
course through practical application gives the student the fundamental 
know-how relative to determining rates and interpreting rules and 
regulations. 

Business Administration 153 — Advanced Freight Rates and Tar- 
iffs (5-0-5). 

A more advanced knowledge of the rates and tariffs of rail car- 
riers. An opportunity to work with the tariffs in the "checking of rail 
rates." Important for those working in traffic departments of indus- 
trial or business concerns. 

Business Administration 154 — Advanced Motor Carries Rates 
(5-0-5). 

This course concentrates on sectional tariffs, combination rates, 
certain arrangements where storage-in-transit is accorded, and methods 
employed in determining transcontinental rates and problems. Actual 
cases are studied and solved. 

Business Administration 155 — Interstate Commerce Law (5-0-5). 

This course familiarizes the student with the vast body of law 
covering the major aspects of interstate commerce and traffic man- 
agement. Deals with problems of car supply, services, rates, claims, 
and other subjects. Reviews what courts have held to be the rights 
and duties of carriers and shippers or users of carrier services. 



38 ARMSTRONG COLLEGE OF SAVANNAH 

CHEMISTRY 

Chemistry \n Chemistry fot Vurses (4-2-5). Fall. Laborator) 
fee, $2.50. Laboratory breakage, $3.00.* 

Principles «»f inorganic, organic and physiological chemistn with 
some special applications t<» nursing practice. 

Chemistry 14 (114) — General Inorganic (5-3-6). Winter. Lab- 
oratory fee, $3.50. Laboratory breakage fee, S3. 00.* Pre-requisite: 
Two years of high school algebra, Mathematics 10 or its equivalent. 

The chemistry of some important metallic and non-metallic ele- 
ment including a systematic treatment of chemical principles and their 
applications. Chemistry 14 and 15 are identical to Chemistry 16, 
17 and 18. 

Chemistry 15 (115) — General Inorganic (5-3-6). Spring. Labora- 
tory fee, $3.50. Laboratory breakage fee, $3.00* Prerequisite: Chem- 
istry 14 or its equivalent. 

Continuation of Chemistry 14. 

Chemistry 16 — General Inorganic (3-3 4 -4). Fall. Laboratory fee. 
$2.50. Laboratory breakage fee, $3.00.* Prerequisite: Two years of 
high school algebra, Mathematics 10 or the equivalent. 

The chemistry of some important metallic and non-metallic ele- 
ments including a systematic treatment of chemical principles and 
their applications. 

Chemistry 17 — General Inorganic (3-3-4). Winter. Laboratory 
fee, $2.50. Laboratory breakage fee, $3.00.* Prerequisite: Chemis- 
try 16. 

Continuation of Chemistry 16. 

Chemistry 18 — General Inorganic ( 3-3-4) . Spring. Laboratory 
fee, $2.50. Laboratory breakage fee, $3.00.* Prerequisite: Chemistry 
17 or its equivalent. 

A continuation of Chemistry 16 and 17. 

Chemistry 24 (124) — Qualitative Inorganic Analysis (3-6-6). Fall. 
Laboratory fee, $5.00. Laboratory breakage fee. $5.00.* Prerequisite: 
Chemistry 15, 18 or its equivalent. 

A study of the fundamental theories of qualitative analysis of 
common cations and anions b\ semi-micro methods. 



* Refundable at the end of cadi quarter if no items have been lost or 
damaged. 



COURSt DESCRIPTIONS 39 

Chemistry 25a Quantitative Inorganic inalysis Win 

ter. Laboratory fee, $3.00. Laboratory breakage Fee, $5.00. Pre 
requisite: Chemistry 2 I or approval «>f the instructoi 

\ stud) of the fundamental theories and application of quantita- 
tive analysis involving volumetric and gravimetric methods with the 
emphasis placed on the volumetric methods. No credit is given for 

this COUrSe before completion of Chemist r\ 2.~>6. 

Chemistry 256 Quantitative Inorganic Analysis (1-6-3). Spring. 
Laboratory fee, $3.00. Laboratory breakage fee, $5.00. Prerequisite: 
Chemistr) 25a or its equivalent. 

The continuation of Chemistry 2rHi. 

COMMERCE 

Commerce 11a (Ilia) Beginning Typing (0-5-2). Kail and 
Winter. Laboratory fee, $3.50. 

This course consist of introductry instruction in the technical 
features and care of the machine, position, fingering, proper technique 
and mastery of the keyboard. An average speed of 35 words a minute 
is attained at the end of the first quarter. 

Commerce 116 (1116) — Beginning Typing Continued (0-5-2). 
Winter and Spring. Laboratory fee, S3. 50. 

This course is a continuation of speed development. In addition, 
instruction in typing letters and setting up simple tabulation is given. 

An average of 45 words a minute should be attained at the end 
of the second quarter. 

Commerce lie (111c) — Intermediate Typing (0-5-2). Spring. 
Laboratory fee, $3.50. Prerequisite: Commerce lla-fe or equivalent. 

A typewriting course in which emphasis is placed on speed building 
and accuracy. Special typing problems such as business letters, minutes, 
notices, stencil cutting and carbon copies are stressed. 

Commerce V2a-b (112a-6) — Beginning Shorthand (5-0-5). Fall 
and Winter. 

Complete theory of Gregg Shorthand in the manual. Additional 
reading and dictation given from Speed Studies. 

Commerce 12c (112c) — Intermediate Shorthand (5-0-5). Spring 



*Refundable at the end of each quarter if no items have been lost or 
damaged. 



40 ARMSTRONG COLLEGE OF SAVANNAH 

Dictation and transcription of new and studied material. Student 

is required t<> take dictation at the rate of eight) words a minute. 

Commerce 13a — Burroughs Calculator and Comptometer (0-5-2). 
Fall. Laboratory fee, 13.50. 

The objective of this course is to build speed and accuracy in the 

operation of the Burroughs Calculator and Comptometer and a thor- 
ough review of husiness mathematics. This quarter is devoted to the 
operation of the four fundamentals in arithmetic on the calculator. 

Commerce 136 — Burroughs Calculator and Comptometer (0-5-2). 
Winter. Lahoratory fee. $3.50. 

The following business mathematics is reviewed and applied on 
the machine during this quarter: decimal equivalents, split division, in- 
voicing over the fixed decimal, percentages, discounts, and chain dis- 
counts, costs, selling and rate of profit. 

Commerce 13c — Burroughs Calculator and Comptometer (0-5-2). 
Spring. Laboratory fee. S3. 50. 

The third quarter is a continuation of business problems on the 
machine. The transactions co\ered are reciprocals figuring grain, 
cipher, divisions, prorating cost and expenses, gross and dozen in in- 
voicing inventories. 

Commerce 17 — Office Practice (5-0-5). Spring. 

Typical business office situations are duplicated as nearly as pos- 
sible. Practical problems deal with typing, operation of the mimeo- 
graph, riling and office courtesy. 

Commerce 21a — Advanced Typing ( 0-5-2 l . Fall. Laboratory fee. 
S3. 50. Prerequisite: Commerce lie or equivalent. 

Advanced typing is a course in the acquisition of speed and accu- 
rae\ including various legal forms and papers, manuscripts and busi- 
ness papers. 

Commerce 216 — A continuation of Commerce 2la i 0-5-2 I . Winter. 
Laboratory fee. S3. 50. 

Commerce 21c — A continuation of Commerce 216 I 0-5-2 l . Spring. 
Laboratory fee. $3.50. An average of 60 words a minute is attained. 

Commerce 22a — Advanced Shorthand (5-0-5). Fall. Prerequisites: 
Commerce 12a, b, c. 

A course in which the principles of Gregg Shorthand are applied 
in developing skill and accurac\ in writing shorthand and in trans* rib- 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 41 

in- The firs! half year is devoted to dictation of general business 
material; tin- second half, to dictation material applying to major 
\ ocations. 

Commerce ~2I> t continuation oj Commerce 22a (5-0-5). W inter. 

Commerce 2'2< I continuation of Commerce 22h (5-0-5). Spring. 

\ Bpeed of 120 words a minute is required. 

Commerce 23a Advanced Calculator and Comptometer 10-5-2). 
Kail. Laboratory fee. S3. 50. 

The next two quarters are devoted to the application of the machine 
and business mathematics to the following businesses: drugs, hardware. 
electrical, plumbing, contracting, wholesale paper, pay roll, packing 
house, creameries and dairies, laundries, steel and iron, department 
Stores banks, lumber, petroleum, railroads. 

Commerce 236 — A continuation of Commerce 23a (0-5-2). Winter. 
Laboratory fee. $3.50. 

Commerce 23c — Advanced Calculator and Comptometer (0-5-21. 
Spring. Laboratory fee, $3.50. 

Speed, skill and accuracy in the operation of the machine are 
stressed in this last period. 



ECONOMICS 

Economics 21 (121) — Principles of Economics (5-0-5). Kail and 
Summer. 

A study of the principles behind the economic institutions of the 
present time and an examination of some of the economic problems 
in the modern world. 

Economics 24 (124) — Problems of Economics (5-0-5). Spring. 
Prerequisite: Economics 21. 

A study of economic problems based upon the principles studied 
in Economics 21. 

Economics 130 — Personnel Administration (5-0-5). Spring. Pre- 
requisites: Elementary Psychology and Economics. 

A study of the principles and practices in the field of the admin- 
tration of human relations and industry. Emphasis is given to scien- 
tific techniques and devices in the development of a well-rounded per- 
sonnel program. 



42 ARMSTRONG COLLEGE OF SAVANNAH 

ENGINEERING 

Engineering II illli Engineering Drawing (0-6-3). Fall. 

Topics of Stud) include lettering: the use of the instruments: 
orthographic projection; auxiliar) views; sections and conventions. 

Engineering L2 ill2l — Engineering Drawing (0-6-3). Winter. 
Prerequisite: Engineering 11. 

Topics of study include drawing conventions; dimensions: pic- 
torial representation: threads and fastenings: shop processes; technical 
sketching; working drawings: pencil tracing on paper, reproduction 
processes. 

Engineering 13 (113) — Engineering Drawing (0-6-3). Spring. 
Prerequisite: Engineering 12. 

Topics of study include technical sketching of piping and fittings; 
working drawings: ink tracing on cloth: working drawings from as- 
semblies and assemblies from working drawings. 

Engineering 19 (119) — Applied Descriptive Geometry (0-6-3). 
Spring. Prerequisite: Engineering 12. 

Topics of study include the solution of problems involving points, 
lines, and planes by use of auxiliary views; the solution of problems 
involving points, lines, and planes by revolution methods; simple inter- 
sections; developments of surfaces; an introduction to warped surfaces. 
Practical applications are emphasized. 

Engineering 26 — Plane Surveying (1-3-2). Summer. Prerequisite: 
Mathematics 17. 

The theory of practice in chaining, differential and profile leveling, 
traversing, topographic surveying, reduction and plotting of field notes 
and mapping. 

ENGLISH 

English 11 — Freshman English I 3-0-3 I . Fall and Spring. 

A survey of Western Literature, in which books are read com- 
plete, rather than in selections: a review of grammar and practices in 
written English is also undertaken. English 11-12-13 integrates with 
History 11-12-13 for the entire Freshman \ear. The discussion method 
is consistently used throughout the year. 

English 12 — A continuation of English 11 1 3-0-3 1. Fall and 
Winter.' 



C01 RSE DESCRIPTIONS l I 



English L3 I continuation of English 12 (3-0-3). Spring and 

\\ inter. 

English -t» Grammai and Composition (5-0-5). Fall. 

\ general review of grammar, composition and vocabulary. Ine 
Btudents will have practice in writing themes, making oral reports, and 
in writing business letters. Several books will be assigned for outside 
reading and discussion. 

English 21 (121) Sophomore English- A Survey of World Lit- 
erature I 5-0-5 I. Fall and Winter. 

This course is designed to give the students a knowledge of the 
principal works of certain major writers, such as Shakespeare, Goethe, 
[bsen and poets of the nineteenth century. The last part of the course 
i- devoted to the study of a number of modern American dramas, and 
modern British and American poetrx. 

English 22 (122) — A continuation of English 21 (5-0-5). Winter 
and Spring. 

English 24 — An introduction to Poetry (5-0-5). Spring. 

A study of the various types and forms of poetry with special 
emphasis on more recent poetry. 

English 25 — American Literature (5-0-5). Fall. 

A survey of American Literature and culture. Each student is 
asked to select one particular period or area or author for concentra- 
tion, making reports and writing papers in that phase of the work. 
The course is primarily conducted by reading and discussion. 

English 27 — Reading Modern Drama (5-0-5). Winter. 

Class reading and discussion of dramas. The plays will not be 
acted. The course is centered on appreciation of drama, diction, and 
reading ability. 

English 28 (1281 — Public Speaking (5-0-5). Spring. 

Fundamental principles invoked in group discussion and the 
preparation and delivery of original speeches for formal occasions. 
The physiology of speech is included. 

English lll.v — Ereshman English (5-0-5). Fall. Spring and Sum- 
mer. 

This course covers a review of punctuation and the fundamentals 
of grammar, theme writing, and vocabulary building. Also the student 
reads and discusses selections from the works of the most prominent 
literary figures of the Western World. 



44 ARMSTR( ).\ G COLLEGE OF SAVANNAH 

English 1 l-\ / continuation o) English 1 1 1 v (5-0 5). Winter and 
Summer. 

Selections from the works of the following authors will be read: 
Homer. Sophocles, Chaucer, Montaigne, Cellini. Voltaire. Chekov, 
Hardy, as well as those of certain English Romantic poets. 

FRENCH 

French 11-12 I 111-112) — Elementary French (5-0-5). Fall and 
Winter. 

A course for beginners. The spoken language is studied as well as 
grammar and reading. 

French 21 (121) — Intermediate French (5-0-5). Pall and Spring. 
Prerequisite: Two quarters of college French or two years of high 
school French. 

Review grammar oral prectice, reading of selected texts. 

French 22 ( 122) — Intermediate French, continued (5-0-5). Winter. 
Prerequisite: Three quarters of college French or three years of high 
school French. 

Further reading of texts, oral and composition practice. 

French 23 — French Literature of the Nineteenth Century (5-0-5). 
Prerequisite: French 22. (Not offered in 1954-1955.) 

A survey course. Reading of texts, written and oral reports o:i 
collateral reading. 

French 24 — French Classical Drama I 5-0-5 ) . Spring. Prerequisite: 
French 22. 

Selected plays of Corneille. M'oliere and Racine. 



GERM A \ 

German 111 — Elementary German (5-0-5). Fall. 

Elements of the grammar, reading of simple texts and speaking. 
German records, films and photographs. 

German 112 — Intermediate German i 5-0-5 i . Winter. 

Grammar, more reading of selected texts and speaking. German 
records, films and photograph-. 






COl RSE DESCRIPTIONS 15 



German 121 Advanced German (5-0-5). Spring. 

Grammar review. Reading <>i" Bhorl -tone- and German magazines 
Composition and conversation. German record-, films and photographs 



HISTORY 

History 11 — An Historical Introduction to Contemporary Civili- 
zation (3-0-3). Fall and Spring. 

This course comprises a chronological survej <>f the main currents 
of political, social, religious and philosophical activih in Western 
Civilization from the period of the sixth centnr\ in Greece to the present 
time. 

History 12 — A continuation of History 11 (3-0-3). Fall. Winter. 

History 13 — A continuation of History 12 (3-0-3). Winter. Spring. 

In addition to a chronological treatment of events studied in the 
above courses, the dynamics of Western Civilization are studied in 
works of the following authors: Plato, Lucretius, St. Augustine, Dante. 
Machiavelli, Descartes. Locke, Jefferson, Rousseau. Adam Smith. Ri- 
cardo. Malthus. Bentham. Marx and others. 

History 11-12-13 are required of all students seeking an Associate 
degree from Armstrong College of Savannah and are designed to be 
complementary with English 11-12-13. 

History 25 (125) — Recent European History (5-0-5). Spring. 

This course is designed to provide an opportunity for detailed 
study of major national and international developments in European 
affairs from about 1870 to the present time. Special emphasis is de- 
voted to the first World War and new developments in Europe follow- 
ing that war and the complex of world events which preceded the Sec- 
ond World War. 

History 26 1126) — Recent American History (5-0-5). Fall and 
Winter. 

This course has as its purpose the examination of the most im- 
portant events and movements political, social and cultural, in Ameri- 
can life from about 1900 to the present time. 

History lilac — An Historical Introduction to Contemporary Civili- 
zation (5-0-5). Fall, Spring and Summer. 

This course comprises a chronological survey of the main currents 
of political, social, religious and philosophical activity in Western 



U. All MM KO NG college of savannah 

Civilization from the period of 'lie sixth century in (/recce to the 
present time. 

History \\2\ I Continuation oj History Lilac (5-0-5). Winter 
and Summer. 

In addition to a chronological treatment of events studied in the 
above courses, the dynamics of Western Civilization are studied in 
works of the following authors: Plato, Lucretius, St. Augustine. Dante. 
Machiavelli, Descartes. Locke, Jefferson, Rousseau, Adam Smith. Ri- 
cardo, Malthus. Bentham, Marx, and others. 

HOME ECONOMICS 

Home Economics 10a — Orientation: Careers 1 3-0-3 I. Fall. 

The many opportunities available in the field, such as food spe- 
cialists, nutrition experts, nursery school teachers, marriage counselors 
and others will be discussed. Professional experts in these fields will 
\ isit the class to show the many vocations dealing with the home. 

Home Economics \()b — Orientation: Personal Development (3-0-31. 
Winter. 

How to be more attractive 'hrough personal grooming and what 
is appropriate in manners and dress on various social occasions are 
emphasized. 

Home Economics In — Nutrition and Food Preparation ( 3-2-4 1. 
Winter. Laboratory fee. $4.00. 

A study of the laws governing the food requirements of human 
beings for maintenance of grow'h. activity, reproduction, and lactation. 
Complete meals are prepared and served in each laboratory period. 

Home Economics 11 — Clothing (2-6-5). Fall. 

Planning and making individual wardrobes. Fashions, design and 
fabrics are studied. Laboratory fee. $1.00. 

Home Economics 12 — Foods (3-4-5). Spring. Laboratorv fee. 
$7.00. 

This course is based on the human food needs. Preparation and 
attractive serving of meals is studied. 

Home Economics 21 — Home Furnishings (4-2-5). Fall. Labora- 
tor\ fee, $2.50. 

The interior and exterior planning of the home is studied. Em- 
phasis is placed on stvles of furniture, color and decoration fabrics 
used in the home. 



C01 RSE DES< RIPTIONS 17 



Home Economics 23 Elementary Textiles and Clothing for the 
Family (2-6-5). Winter. Laboratory fee, $1.00. 

Practical application of elementary textile rtud) to the selection 
ami use of clothing for tin- family. 

Home Economics 2\ Family Fundamentals (5-0-5). Spring. 

\ course in the family with the problems thai one faces in the 

preparation for children and the adjustment to these children. 

MATHEMATICS 
Mathematics 10 (110) — Basic Skills in Mathematics (5-0-5). 

(Not open to students who have high school credit for two years 
of algrcbra and one of plane geometry.) 

This course provides an opportunity for the student to acquire 
basic skills in mathematics necessan to meet the common demands of 
\arious college programs. 

Topics from plane geometr\ include the properties of such geo- 
metric figures as polygons, triangles and circles. 

Topics from algebra include fractions, signed numbers, linear 
equations, ratio, proportions, variation, elements of finance and graphs. 

Mathematics 16 (116 I — College Algebra (5-0-5). Fall and Spring. 
Prerequisite: Two years of high school algebra and one of plane geome- 
try, or Mathematics 10. 

The course consists of functions and graphs, logarithms, linear 
and quadratic equations, the binomial theorem, complex numbers and 
the elementary theory of equations. 

Mathematics 17 (117i — Trigonometry (5-0-5). Fall and Winter. 
Prerequisite: Mathematics 16. 

A course covering the solution of the right and general triangle, 
the general solution of trigonometric equations, trigonometric identi- 
ties, polar coordinates. 

Mathematics 18 (118) — Plane Analytic Geometry (5-0-5). Winter 
and Spring. Prerequisite: Mathematics 17. 

Analytic geometry of the point and the line, elemental*) conic sec- 
tions, polar coordinates, transcendental curves and transformation of 
coordinates. 

Mathematics 19 (119) — Mathematics of Finance (3-0-3). Spring. 
Prerequisite: Mathematics 16. 



4S ARMSTRONG COLLEGE OF SAVANNAH 

This course gives that background necessary for dealing with 
problems found in banking, real < state, financing, and accounting; the 
operation of the compound-interest law in business; simple problems 
concerning bonds, sinking fund-, valuation of properties and annuities. 
Practical problems in these fields will he emphasized. The necessary 
aids and shortcuts and use of tahles and logarithms will he studied. 

Mathematics 21 (121) — Differential Calculus (5-0-5). Fall. Pre- 
requisite: Mathematics 1<"». 

Theon of differentiation, with application to tangents: maxima and 
minima, rates, curvature, velocity and acceleration, approximation-, 
and Newton's method. 

Mathematics 22 l 122 l — Integral Calculus (5-0-5). Winter. Pre- 
requisite: Mathematics 21. 

Formulas and methods of integration, single integration applied 
in areas and lengths: volumes and surfaces of revolution: centroids 
and moments of inertia: pressure and work. 

Mathematics 99 — Intermediate Algebra for College Students. 
(5-0-5). Fall and Spring. (Not offered in 1954-1955.1 

A stud\ of the fundamental operations of algebra together with 
factoring, fractions, linear equations, exponents and radicals, quadratic- 
equations, graphical methods, ratio and proportion, and functional 
notation. 

MUSIC 

Music 11 — Elementary Theory and Sight R^adimz (5-0-5). Fall. 
(Not offered 1953-1954.1 

A course designed to teach the student to read music at sight and 
to understand the fundamental principles of music theory. Melodic dic- 
tation, melody writing and an introduction to elementary harmony are 
included. 

Music 12 — Theory and Harmony (5-0-5). Winter. Prerequisite: 
Music 11. (Not offered 1953-1954.1 

A continuation of Music 11. with emphasis on harmony, harmonic 
dictation, four-part harmonic writing. 

Music 20 — Music Appreciation (5-0-5). Spring. 

A course designed to help the student understand and enjoy great 
music. Several works will be analyzed in detail as to form and struc- 
ture. A text will be used for factual background: class time being con- 
centrated on brief exposition of themes followed by listening to records. 



COl RSE DES< RIPTIONS 19 



Music and composers from i h» ■ Earl) Christian period up through tin- 

modem period u ill !»•' Btudied. 

Music 1 I .VI 1(>-1 IT Ippreciation o) Music (2-0-2). Fall, Winter 
and Spring. 

Courses designed for tin- musical^ untrained who wish an intelli- 
gent understanding of the arts of music. Lectures, discussions and 
recorded listening sessions comprise the course. 

Music 121-122-123— Class Voice (2-0-2). Fall. Winter and Spring. 

Group instruction in fundamentals of voice production, articula- 
tion, diction, breath control, physical and mental poise, applied in the 

s!ud\ of songs. 

Music 124-125-126 — Class Piano I 2-0-2 i. Fall, Winter and Spring. 
(Not offered in 1954-1955.1 

Group instruction in the fundamentals of piano-playing with em- 
phasis on practical application. The study of piano material appro- 
priate to the level of the individual student. 

PHILOSOPHY 

Philosophy 11 1-1 12-1 IS (2-0-2) Introduction to Philosophy. Fall. 
Winter and Spring. 

\n informal discussion of the thinking of certain Greek. Roman. 
Early Christian, Rennaissance and modern writers. 

Philosophy 114-115-116 (2-0-2) Seminar in Philosophy. Fall. Win- 
ter and Spring. (Not offered in 1953-54.) 

Seminar in philosophy discussing the ideas as developed in the 
writings of Plato. Aristotle, Suetonius. Montaigne. Pascal, de Tocque- 
ville. Freud. Reisman. Lawrence, and others. 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION 
Physical Education 11 — Conditioning Course (0-3-1). Fall. 

Consists of calisthenics, stunts and tumbling, lifts and carries, road 
work, dual combatives. and simple games. 

Physical Education 12 — Team Sports (0-3-1). Winter. 

Consists of baske'ball, soccer, speedball and volleyball. 

Physical Education 13 — Elementary Swimming (0-3-1). Spring. 

Physical Education 14 — Officiating of Basketball (1-3-2). Winter. 
Prerequisite: P. E. 12 or the equivalent. 



50 ARMSTRONG COLLEGE OF SAN \\\ Ml 



Consists oi a Btud) oi rules interpretation and actual experience 
in coaching and officiating in class and intramural games. Elective 
credit, except when substituted for P. E. 12. 

Physical Education 20 — First Aid <ui<l Safety Education (4-0-3). 
Winter. 

The American Red Cross standard curse in first aid is followed 
b\ a broad consideration of the opportunities for safety teaching in 
the school program. 

Physical Education 21 — Elementary Tennis I 0-3-1 I. Fall. 

Physical Education 22 — Elementary Boxing for Men 1 0-3-1 j. 
Winter. 

Physical Education 23 — Senior Life Saving and Instructors' Course 
in Swimming (2-3-2). Spring. 

Physical Education 24 — Boxing for Teachers i 2-3-2 I . Winter. 

Physical Education 25 — Folk Rhythms (0-3-1). Fall. 

Physical Education 26 — Modern Dance for Women (0-3-1 i. 
Winter. 

Physical Education 27 — Tap Dance for Beginners (0-3-1 1. Winter. 

Physical Education 28 — Adult Recreative Sports (0-3-1 1. Spring. 

Consists of passive, semi-active and active games and sports which 
have carry-over value for later life. 

Physical Education 29 — Folk Rhythms for Teachers (2-3-2). Fall. 

This course consists of advance training in folk dances and prac- 
tice teaching of those dances. 

Physical Education 30 — Archery I 0-3-1 I. Spring. 

PHYSICAL SCIENCE 

Physical Science 11 (111). (4-2-5). Fall. Laboratory fee. $2.50. 
No prerequisite. 

\ stud) of the scientific method and its use in the attempt of man 
to describe and explain the nature of the physical universe. This will 
include the study of fundamentals oi physics and astronomy with some 
example of the applications of this knowledge in providing a better 
living for man. An attempt is made to go from the study of the large 
universe to the study of the small fundamental particles of which this 
universe is composed. 



C01 RSE DESCRIPTIONS 51 



Physical Science 1- (112). (4-2-5). Winter. Laboratory fee, 
$2.50. Laboratory breakage fee, 13.00. Prerequisite: Physical Sci« 
ance 1 1 . 

\ continuation * » f Physical Science LI. In this course emphasis is 
placed on the stud) «»f the principles of Inorganic and organic chem- 
istry with some example of the application of chemistry in household, 
industry, medicine, biology, geology, etc. Here the knowledge of the 

structure of the fundamental particles of matter I atom- and molecules) 

is used in the stud) of the cjassifiiation of tin- simple components of 
matter (elements) and the changes which the) undergo to form more 
complex substances (compounds). 

*Rt»fun<ial)l»' at the end of the quarter it do equipment is l<»-t or broken. 

PHYSICS 

1'hvsics 11 (111) — General Physics (5-2-6). Winter. Laboratory 
fee, $2.50. Prerequisite: a course in college mathematics or consent 
of the instructor. 

Lectures, demonstrations, recitations and laboratorx work covering 
the fields of mechanics and heat. 

Physics 12 (112) — General Physics l 5-2-6 i . Spring. Laboratory 
fee. $2.50. Prerequisite: Physics 11 or consent of the instructor. 

Lectures, demonstrations, recitations and laboratory work covering 
the fields of electricity, sound and light. 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 

Political Science 12 1 112 I — The Governments of Foreign Powers 
(5-0-51. Summer and Winter. 

A study is made of the leading modern political theories, and 
attention is paid to the structure and powers of the major foreign gov- 
ernments. 

Political Science 13 (113 1 — Government of the United States 
( 5-0-5 l . Fall and Spring. 

A study is made of the structure. theor\ . workings of the national 
government in the Lnited States and some of the major problems of 
the state and local government. The course show- how developmental 
practice has created our government as it stand- today. 

PSYCHOLOGY 

Psychology In ( 5-0-5 l . 

This course is an introduction to the stud\ of human behavior with 



52 ARMSTRONG COLLEGE OF SAVANNAH 

emphasis on the underlying principles of mental adjustments. The im- 
portance <>f the nurse's own personality is stressed. 

Psychology 2] I 121 i Introductory Psychology (5-0-5). Fall and 
\\ inter.' 

In this course human behavior is analyzed into its elementary 

functions of learning, feeling, thinking, maturation, motives and con- 
flicts. Facts and principles from scientific research in psychology are 
used for understanding these functions and for measuring individual 
differences in ability, personality and development. Standardized experi- 
ments and the student's own experiences are used to explore and apply 
the facts in this field. 

Psychology 22 (122) — Social Psychology (5-0-5). Spring. Pre- 
requisite: Psychology 21. 

This course provides a study of the interactions between the indi- 
vidual and his social groups. Basic psychological process of sensory- 
perceptual behavior, motivation, learning and thinking are studied as 
they affect an individual's adjustment to the social groups and institu- 
tions of our culture. Special attention is given to a study of group 
membership, leadership, development of attitudes and values, public- 
opinion, propaganda, prejudice and other inter-group tensions. 

Psychology 23 (123) — Child Psychology (5-0-51. Spring. Pre- 
requisite: Psychology 21. 

This course offers a study of the developmental factors operating 
in a child's experience which make for, or interfere with, effective ex- 
pression of his capacities and adjustments to life situations. Sources 
are drawn from experimental research and from findings of analytic 
psychology. Direct observation of children individually and in a nur- 
sery is used as a cource of class discussion. 

Psychology 25 (125) — Psychology of Adjustment. (50-5). Fall. 

The class setting is used in this course for direct experience of the 
use of group discussion for self-understanding. This is supplemented 
by systematic written self-analysis. 

SOCIAL SCIENCE 
Social Science 101 — Current World Affairs (2-0-2). 

Film discussion class covering the national problems of various 
countries, their trade, ambitions, and fears: their resources and econo- 
mies examined and considered in relation to America s own outlook 
and interest. 

Social Science 104 — Contemporary Georgia ( 5-0-5 I. Summer. 



C01 RSE DESCRIPTIONS 



\ stud) of currenl economic and Bocial statistics as pertaining to 

agriculture, industry, and commerce: population trends, and govern 
menial organization and problems. 

SOCIOLOGY 

Sociology \n Elementary Sociology (5-0-5). Fall. 

This course considers ll) the principles of sociology; (2) the 
DUrse as a citizen of the community and as a professional worker: (.'">) 
the importance of the hospital among the social agencies in the com- 
munity; (4) the patient in the hospital coming from the family and 
returning to the family. 

Sociology 20 (120) — Introductory Sociology (5-0-5). Winter. 

\ -tudy of the principles of social organizations in American cul- 
ture based on scientific studies of groups, "races," population and of 
the institutionalized functions of society. 

Sociology 21 I 121 I — Marriage and the Family (5-0-5). Winter 
and Spring. 

This course introduces the family as an institution in various 
cultures as a setting for studying the institutional characteristics of the 
modern American family. This is followed by analysis of personality 
development basic to mature marital love, choice of a mate, marital 
adjustment, parenthood, family administration, and sociological trends 
for family stability, family disorganization and adjustment of the aging. 

SPANISH 

Spanish 111-112 — Elementary (5-0-5). Fall and Winter. 

These courses are for the purpose of providing the student with 
the elements of Spanish reading, composition and conversation. 

Spanish 121 — Intermediate Spanish (5-0-5). Fall and Spring. 

This course gives the student an opportunity to review the ele- 
ments of Spanish grammar and to delve into the fine points of the 
language. 



INDEX 

I'M. I 

Admission to Class 20 

Admission to College 10-12 

Admission of Special Students 12 

Admission <>l Transient Students. 12 

\(lmi<sion of Veterans 12 

Administration 

Advanced Standing 11 

Advisement and Placement Tests 20 

Vims 9-10 

Art, Course Descriptions 32 33 

Assemblies 22 

Associate in Arts 21 

Athletics 19 

Attendance Regulations 22 

\udio-\ isual Instruction 17 

Biology, Course Descriptions 33-34 

Business Administration, Course Descriptions 34-37 

Business Administration, Senior College Preparatory 25 

Business Administration, Terminal 25 

Business Administration. 1-Year Program 29-30 

Calendar 1954-1955 2 

Certificate, Admission by 11 

Chemistry, Course Descriptions 38-39 

College Commission 3 

Commencement Exercises 18 

Commerce, Course Descriptions 39 1 1 

Commerce, Secretarial, Terminal 27 

Conduct 20 

Core Curriculum 21 

Counseling 14 

Course Load 20 

Course Descriptions 32-53 



I N I) E \ 



I'M. I 

t ..in -<■ Numbers 32 

Curriculums 24-31 

Dean's 1 isl 22 

Economics, Course Descriptions 41 

Engineering, Senior College Preparatory 30 

Engineering ... 42 

English, Course Descriptions 42-44 

Evening College 15 

Faculty 3-7 

Fees 12-13 

French, Course Descriptions 44 

General Regulations 20-23 

( .ci man. ( lourse Descriptions; 44-45 

Glee Club 19 

Grades 21 

Graduation, Requirements for 22 23 

History of the College 9 

1 1 i-toi \ . ( bourse Descriptions 45-46 

Hodgson Hall 14 

Holidays 2 

Homecoming 17 

Home Economics, Course Descriptions 46-47 

Home Economics, Senior College Preparatory 27 

Home Economics, Terminal 28 

Honors 21 

Liberal Arts, Senior College Preparatory 29 

Liberal Arts, Terminal 29 

Library 14 

Masquers 19 

Mathematics, Course Descriptions 47-48 

Medical Technician 26-27 

Mental Health Clinic 15 

Music, Course Descriptions 48-49 

Night School (See Evening College) 15 

Nursing, 1-Year Program 31 

Open House 17 

Organization of the College 9-10 

Orientation and Advisement 14 



ARMSTRONG COLLEGE OF SAVANNAH 



1* V«.K 



Philosophy 

Physical Education 

Physical Education, Course Descriptions 

Physical Education, Senior College Preparatory 

Physical Examination 

Physical Science 

Physics, Course Descriptions 

Placemen! Service 

Placemen! Tests 

Political Science, Course Descriptions 

Pre-Dental 

Pre-Medical 

Pre-Pharmacy 

Psychology, Course Descriptions 

Publications 

Recommendations 

Refunds 

Reports and Grades 

Requirements for Graduation 

Scholarships 

Science. Senior College Preparatory 

Senior College Courses 

Social Science 

Sociology, Course Description- 

Spanish. Course Descriptions 
Stenographic. l-\car Program 

Student Activities 

Student Assistants 

Student Center 
Summer School Calendar 
Transfer to Other Institution- 
Transportation. Terminal 
Transportation. I A car Program 
I Diversity oi Georgia Extension Division 
Withdrawal from Collect 



19 

19 

49-50 

28 

20 

50-51 

51 

18 

20 

51 

26-27 

26-27 

26 27 

51-52 

19 

23 

13 

21 

22-23 

17-13 

26-27 

16 

52-53 

53 

53 

31 

18 

17 

18 

2 

24 

25 26 

30 

16 

22 



ARMSTRONG COLLEGE 

LIBRARY 









955- 1 956 

BULLETIN 





iJQyyysig^ 



)tWF eiviNNAH OEORGIA 



37B-C2- 
A73S 



1953- 1956 



SUMMKH 1 All WIMKi; Sl'l!l\<; 



111 I.LETIN OF 

Armstrong College 

of Savannah 



A City Supported Junior College 

SAVANNAH. GEORGIA 




18346 



Membership In 

American Association of Junior Colleges 

Southern Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools 

Association of Georgia Colleges 

Georgia Association of Junior Colleges 



VOLUME XX NUMBER 1 



ARMSTRONG COuLdGS 

LIBRARY 



CALENDAR FOR L955 - L956 

-I MMI.K SESSION — EVENING COLLEGE L955 



firsi ii.i;\i 



nation 
< [gggefl begin 
Lasl daj to register tor credit 

Mid-term reports due 

Holiday 

Examinations 



Registration 

Classes begin 

Last day to register for credit 

Mid-term reports due 

Examinations 



SECOND TERM 



Monday, June 13 

Tuesday, June 14 

Friday, June 17 

Friday. July 1 

Monday, July 4 

Thursday, July 21 



Monday. July 25 

. Tuesday, Julv 26 

Friday, July 29 

Friday, August 12 

Friday, September 2 



FALL QUARTER 

Freshman testing and Sophomore Counseling Monday, September 12 

Freshman Orientation and Registration Tuesday thru Friday, September 13-16 

Registration Monday, September 19 

Classes begin Tuesday, September 20 

Last day to register for credit Friday, September 23 

Mid-term reports due Friday, October 21 

Thanksgiving holidays Thursday thru Sunday. November 24-27 

Pre-registration Wednesday through Friday, November 30-December 2 

Examinations Wednesday through Friday. December 7-9 

Basketball game Saturday, December 10 

Reception and dance Monday. December 19 

Christmas holidays Monday, December 12 thru Sunday. January 1 






WINTER QUARTER 

Registration Monday. January 2 

Classes begin Tuesday, January 3 

Last day to register for credit Friday. January 6 

Mid-term reports due Friday. February 3 

Pre-registration Monday through Wednesday. February 27-29 

Examinations Monday through Wednesday. March 12-14 

Spring holidays Thursday through Wednesday. March 15-21 



SPRING QUARTER 



Registration 

Classes begin 

Last day to register for credit 

Mid-term reports due 

Pre-registration Summer and Fall quarters 

Examinations 

Sophomore Beach Party 

Craduation 



Thursday, March 22 

Friday. March 23 
Wednesday. March 28 

Friday. April 27 

\\ ednesday thru Friday. May 16-18 

Monday through Wednesday, June 4-6 

Friday. June 8 

Tuesday. June 12 



\ (1 111 inistratio n 

THE COLLEGE COMMISSION 

Hi ks< in i \ Jenkins Chairman 

Wii.i.iwi Mi i;i'iii:\ V ice-Chairman 

William L Early, Ex-officio Lee Mingledorff, Jr., Ex-officio 

11. Lee Fulton, Jr., Ex-officio John F. Pidcock, F.\-<>jii<i<> 

Victor l>. Jenkins Dr. Helen •Sharplei 

Herbert 1.. Kwrox Harri T. Shore, Jr., Ex-officio 

Fred \\ essels, Jr. 

ADMINISTRATIVE STAFF AND FACULTY 

Iokim \\ M. Hawes, A.B., M.S President 

ARTHUR M. GiGNILUAT, LB., M. \.. Ph.D. Vice-President and Director 

of The Evening College 

Jl i i: C. Rossiter, Associate in Arts Secretary & Treasurer 

M. Lokkune Anchors, A.B., M.A Registrar 



W. Orson Beecher, A.B., M.A., Emory University; M.A., University 
of Georgia 

Instructor in History 

William L. Bell, B.S. in Education, Georgia Teachers College; Grad- 
uate Study, George Peabody College for Teachers 
Basketball Coach and Instructor in Physical Education for Men 

* Stephen P. Bond, Bachelor of Science and Architecture, Georgia 
Institute of Technology 

Instructor in Engineering 

Arthur W. Casper, B.S., Beloit College; M.S., University of Wisconsin, 
M.S., University of Georgia 

Instructor in Mathematics and Physics 

Lamar W. Davis, B.S. and M.S., University of South Carolina; Cer- 
tified Public Accountant 

Instructor in Business Administration 

Josephine Simmons Denmark, B.S., Georgia Teachers College: M.S. 
in H.E., University of Georgia 

Instructor in Home Economics 

Joseph W. Green, A.B., Birmingham-Southern College; M. A., Van- 
derbilt Lniversity: Graduate Study toward a doctorate. Vander- 
bilt Lmiversitx 

Instructor in English 



ADMINISTRATION 



Essii Di\< w li \m\>. Owensboro Business (College. Kentucky. 
Instructor in Typing 

Jane Ki w. Valdosta State College 

(Jen, til Assistant in the Registrar's Ojji 

Joseph I. Killorin, LB., N t. John- College: M.A.. Columbia University 
Instructor in History 

\1\i;i.\kii Spencer Lubs, B.M.. Converse College: A.B.. University 
of Georgia; M.A., Columbia I Diversity 

Instructor in French and English 

VlRGINU Mattson, Dickinson College. Junior College Certificate 
Assistant to the Librarian 

Elmo M. McCRAT, Jr.. B.S.. and M.S.. University of Alabama 
Instructor in Biology 

ClAUDIA McPipkin. Certificate in Secretarial Course. Armstrong Col- 
lege of Savannah 

Clerical Assistant in the Registrar's Office 

Helen MEIGHEN, Ta\lor"s Business College 

Secretary to the Vice-President 

John Morris, B.S. in Engineering. Princeton University: M.S. in 
Chemical Engineering. Georgia Institute of Technology 
Instructor in Chemistry 

Marjorie A. Mosley, Associate in Finance and Commerce. Armstrong 
College of Savannah 

Secretary to the President 

Jack H. Padgett, A.B.. Wofford College: M.A.. University of North 
Carolina 

Instructor in Mathematics 

""James Harry Persse, B.F.A.. University of Georgia: Master of Music. 

Florida State University 
Director of the Glee Club and Faculty Advisor for Student Publications 

Jack Porter, A.B.. George Peabody College for Teachers: M.A.. Uni- 
versity of North Carolina 
Instructor in English and Director of the Armstrong Masquers 

Jo Anne Roukos, Certificate in Secretarial Course, Armstrong College 
of Savannah 

Clerical Assistant in the Business Office 



*Part-time instructor 



\i>\ii\Kii;\Ti<>\ 



II u Rowland, V.B., Mercei I niversity; Master of Librarianship, 
Ijhoin I niversit) 

Librarian 

Dorothi Thompson, \.l>.. Monmouth College; \l. \.. Northwestern 
University; Certificate of Psychiatric Social \\«>ik. Western Re- 
serve University 

Instructor in Psychology and Sociology 

Carmen Torrie, B.S., Concord College; M.S.. I niversit) of Tennessee 
Director of Athletics and Instructor in Physical Education 

Dorothy Morris Wade, H.S.. I niversit] of Tennessee 

Instructor in Physical Education for Women and 
Acting Director of the Physical Education Program 

GLADYS Nichols Zilch, Diploma from the Gregg School of Chicago 
Instructor in Commerce 

Minnie McG. Campbell, Diploma from the Banks Secretarial School 
Clerical Assistant in the Registrar's Office 

Elizabeth Pound, Georgia State College for Women. State Teachers 
College 

Director of the Student Center 

ARMSTRONG EVENING COLLEGE INSTRUCTORS 

Tommy W. Adams, B.S. in Business Adminsitration. Berry College 
Instructor in Commerce 

David A. Barkley, General Agent Acme Fast Freight 

Instructor in Transportation and Traffic Management 

Ware T. Beall, A.B., M.S., Mercer University: Graduate Work. Univ. 
of Wisconsin 

Instructor in Mathematics 

Erdman Bowe, A.B.. Randolph-Macon Woman's College: M.A.. Colum- 
bia Universit) 

Instructor in Geography 

Ronald F. Brunson, B.M.E.. Clemson College 
Instructor in Mathematics 

Samuel A. Cann, A.B.. L.L.B. University of Georgia 
Instructor in Political Science 

James W. Carter, A.B.. Universtiy of Florida: Graduate Work. I ni- 
versity of Florida 

Instructor in English 



ADMINISTRATION 



James Charbonnier, V.B., B.S., Geneva College, Geneva University, 
Switzerland; B. D., Drew I Diversity; \. M.. Yale University; 

Doctor of Letter-. Geneva I niversirj 

Instructor in French, German and History 

\Y. Hobart Childs, B.S., Wheaton College: Th.B., Th.M.. Westminister 

Theological Semiuarx : S.T.M.. Faith Theological Seminar} 

Instructor in Mathematics 

PHILLIP E. DaLTON, B.A., I diversity of Miami 

Instructor in Psychology 

Orlando A. Diaz, B.S., Phillips University; M.A., Phillips University 

Instructor in Spanish 
DAVID Feidelson, B.A., Birmingham-Southern College; M.A.. City 
College of New York 

Instructor in English 
Michael J. Gannam, B.A., University of Georgia; M.A., University 
of North Carolina; LL.B, Universit) of Georgia 
Instructor in Political Science 
Clare B. Gray, B.A.. Florida State University 
Instructor in English 
Florence F. Goodrich, A.B.. Hillsdale College: M.S.P.H.. University 
of Michigan 

Instructor in Sociology 
Virgil Hall, B.S. in N.A.&N.E., Massachusetts Institute of Technology 

Instructor in Mathematics 

Robert G. Hattwick, B.A., Ohio State University: M.B.A.. Ohio State 

University; Ph.D., Florida State University 

Instructor in Psychology 

Julia F. Hering, B.S., Florida State University; M.A., Florida State 

University 

Instructor in History 

Joe Garland Higgs, B.S.C.E. University of Tennessee: M.S.C.E.. Pud- 
due Universit) 

Instructor in Mathematics 
Rosa B. Hopson, A.B., Middlebury College; M.A.. University of Geor- 
gia: Certificate from Sorbonne I diversity 

Instructor in English and French 

Virginia L. Hudson, B.S., Education. Georgia State College for Wom- 
en; M.A., Duke Universit) 

Instructor in History 
Warren R. Jones, B.C.E.. Georgia Institute of Technology 

Instructor in Engineering Drawing 
Patrick J. Kelley, Assistant General Traffic Manager. Benton Rapid 
Express 

Instructor in Transportation and Traffic Management 



\i>\ii\i>ii! \im\ 



Mari Howard Lebey, \ B., Winthrop CoUege; M.S.S.W .. I aiveroitj 

of North Carolina 

I nsti uctot in Sociology 

Albert IJ. Marks, Jr., U.S.. University of North Carolina; Certi- 
fied Public Accountant 

Instructor in Business Administration 

John I- 1.1:1: i wood Mookk, Savannah Traffic Bureau 

lush net or in Transportation and Traffic Management 

Joseph C. Mi ller, B.B. \.. I niversity of Georgia 

Instructor in Commerce 

Christopher li. Mikimiy. Jk.. Student Beaux Arts Institute and The 
\rt Students" League. New York 

Instructor in Drawing and Painting 

MARGARET A. Murphy, A.B., University of Georgia; Advanced Study. 
Columbia I niversit) 

Instructor in Ceramics 

Robert A. Porter, A.B., Duke University; M.S.S.W., School of Social 
Work. Richmond Professional Institute of the College of William 
and Man 

Instructor in Psychology 

Harold J. Reeves, B.S., Brown University; M.B.A., University of 
Pennsylvania 

Instructor in Business Administration 

Marion J. Rice, A.B., Emory University, M.A., Emory Universitx 

Instructor in Political Science 
Bart E. Shea III, B.S., University of Alabama: LL.B., Emory Uni- 
versity 

Instructor in Business Administration 
Howard Smith, B.S., Georgia Teachers College 
Instructor in English 

Paul A. Stein, B.B.A., The College of the City of New York: Certi- 
fied Public Accountant 

Instructor in Business Administration 
Robert I. Strozier, A.B., Graduate Study, University of Georgia 

Instructor in English 
Mary E. Sutton, B.A.. University of Georgia 
Instructor in Economics 
Louts A. Thompson, M.B.A.. LL.B.. University of Georgia: Certified 
Public Accountant 

Instructor in Business Administration 
Joseph Zelmgher, A.B., D.D.S., New York Universitx 
Instructor in Chemistry 






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Genera] In formal ion 

Histori \mi Organization 

Armstrong College of Savannah was founded on \la\ 27. L935, l>\ 
the Mayor ana Udermen of tin- Cit) of Savannah to meel a long felt 
need for a junior college. The firsl college building was tin- magnificenl 
home of the late George F. Armstrong, a gift to the <it\ from his widow 
and hi> daughter. The former home, now called the Armstrong Building, 
is an imposing structure of Italian Rennaissance architecture: inside, 
its spacious rooms and marble halls lend an air of dignity; while out 
side it is one of the most beautiful college buildings in the South. 

Over the \ears. through private donation and public appropriation, 

the campus has been enlarged until now it includes four additional 
buildings: the Lane Building, a gift of the late Mills B. Lane, prominent 
hanker: /ohn W. Hunt Memorial Building in which are located the 
Student Center, the Home Economics Program, the Women's Lounge, 
the Dancing Studio, and the Music Room; Herschel V. Jenkins Hall. 
which contains the auditorium, theater for the Armstrong College 
Masquers, and class rooms: and Thomas Gamble Hall, site of science 
lecture rooms and laboratories. 

Three of the buildings face forty-acre Forsyth Park, the most beau- 
tiful park in the city; the other two face Monterey Square, one of the 
carefully planned squares for which Savannah is famous. 

Hodgson Hall, across from Forsyth Park on Whitaker Street, con- 
tains the college library as well as the Library of the Georgia Historical 
Societx. to which Armstrong students have access. 

The college is under the control of a commission of six members, 
appointed by the Mayor. In addition, the commission includes as ex- 
officio members the Mayor, the Chairman of the Chatham County Board 
of Education, the Chairman of the County Commissioners, the Super- 
intendent of the Board of Education, and the President of the Savannah 
Chamber of Commerce. 

Except for the war )ears, enrollment has shown a steady increase. 
At present the total number of students in the day and evening pro- 
grams is approximately nine hundred and fift\. 

Aims 
The college seeks to serve the communit\ b\ giving the men and 
women who attend its classes a better understanding of the world in 
which they live and the experience of adapting knowledge to meet the 
obligations and responsibilities of citizenship. 

The student may complete one or more of the following 
specific objectives. 

1. Complete the freshman and sophomore years of the 



10 ARMSTRONG COLLEGE OF SAVANNAH 

lour year senior college program leading to the bac« 

calaureate decree: 

2. Finish two years of pre-professional work leading to- 
ward medicine, dentistry, law, home economics, the 
ministry and other professions; 

.'^. Graduate from a semi-professional program, prepared 
to g<> into business or industry ; 

1. Complete the first year of an engineering program 
which is transferable for eredit to colleges of en- 
gineering. 

The college awards the degree of Associate in Arts to students 
completing an approved program. 

Admission to the College 

( For dates see calendar on page 2 1 

A student planning to enter Armstrong will obtain from the Regis- 
trar an "Application for Admission Card." The student will complete 
and return this form to the Registrar's office. Request the High School 
Principal, or the College Registrar ( in the case of a transfer student I . 
(o send a transcript of credits to the Registrar's Office. Armstrong Col- 
lege of Savannah. Savannah, Georgia. 

Having checked the student's records for compliance with the 
minimum requirements for admission, the Registrar's office will send 
a notice to the student that he has been admitted to the college, together 
with certain physical examination forms which must be completed and 
returned before the student can complete registration. The applicant 
will be notified of the dates of the freshman placement examinations. 
These tests do not affect a student's entering Armstrong, but will enable 
the facult) advisers to assist him in selecting a program of studv upon 
entrance. Students are required to take these test measurements before 
registration is completed. 

Requirkmkms For Admission 

There are two methods of admission to Armstrong College: either 
b) certificate or b\ examination. 

\'.\ CERTIFICATE 

1. A candidate for admission to Armstrong College of Savannah 



GEN1 RAL INFORMATION II 



l»\ certificate must be a graduate "f an accredited high Bchool with al 
leasl fifteen units of credit. 

2. No Bubjecl mallei unit> arc prescribed. The high school pro 
gram Bhould be of such nature as to give satisfactory preparation for 
beginning college studies. Subjects which ma\ be expected to con 

tribute l<> thi^ •■ml arc English composition, literature, natural science. 

hist(»r\ and other social studies, foreign languages, and mathematics 

The right i> reserved to reject an\ applicant whose high school program 

does not indicate adequate preparation for college work. 

3. \ record of high school credits earned by the applicant should 
be made out on the proper forms hy an official of the high school and 
mailed directl) to the Office of the Registrar. This certificate becomes 
the propert) of the college and cannot be returned to the applicant. 

4. Three units in mathematics are a pre-requisite for admission 

to the freshman class in engineering. 

\\\ EXAMINATION 

Students beyond high school age. who do not meet the above 
recpiirements for admission by certificate, may take the General Edu- 
cational Development tots (high school level). The student will be 
admitted to college on the basis of his score. These tests should be 
completed at least one week before registration. Additional informa- 
tion ma\ he secured from the Registrars office. 

ADMISSION TO ADVANCED STANDING 

Advanced credit will be allowed for work done in other institu- 
tion- of proper rank and standing and in certain cases for training 
received in the Armed Service. Credit toward graduation from transfer 
institutions will be accepted if the student has a general average of 
"C" for all college work completed. To receive a diploma from Arm- 
strong College of Savannah, a student must be in attendance taking a 
normal study load for two quarters, earn a * k C" average and. in addi- 
tion, must satisfy the requirements of a particular course of study. 
Adults (students over 21 years of age) may receive credit for certain 
college work on the basis of the General Educational Development 
tests (college level). 

\l)\IISSIO.\ OF VETERANS 

Armstrong College of Savannah will accept veterans who are not 
high school graduates if their official General Educational Development 
tests show scores that indicate the applicant's ability to do college work. 
A Certificate of Eligibility and Entitlement (VA Form No. 7-1993) is 



12 ARMSTRONG CQLL KGE OF SAVANNAH 

required of ever) veteran who attends this institution under Public 
Law 550 i Korean Bill), application for which nia\ be completed at 
the Veterans Administration office in the Blun Building, Savannah, 
Georgia. Immediately upon receipt of certificate from the Veterans 
Administration, tin- student should contact the college business office 
regarding processing of certificate and future monthly report-. 

\ll veterans attending Armstrong under Public Law 346 mu-t 
presenl a certificate of eligibility the fir-t time they register at Arm- 
strong College. \ veteran who has not obtained a certificate of eligi- 
bility prior to registration will be required to pa\ cash, which may be 

refunded by the Business Office upon receipt of the certificate. Ml 
veterans attending Armstrong under Public Law 550 should be pre- 
pared to pay tuition and fees at time of registration. 

LDMISSIOIN OF SPE< I \L STIDKN I"S 

Adults who are interested in enrolling in courses for their intrinsic 
value but who do not wish college credit may be enrolled as special 
students. Requirements pertaining to entrance examinations, phvscial 
examination-, and physical education do not apply to these students. 

TRANSIENT STUDENTS 

\ student regularly enrolled in another college may register at 
Armstrong as a transient student with the permission of his dean or 
advisor For such a student, entrance requirements are waived. 

FEES 
Tuition will be charged as follows for Armstrong College Courses: 

For 12-17 quarter hours — $55.00. 

For each quarter hour less tlicin 12 quarter hours — 84.60. 

For each quarter hour in excess of 17 quarter hours — $4.60. 

Students will be allowed registration day and the day after in 
which to complete registration. \fter these two days, a late registra- 
tion fee of $3.00 will be charged on the first day. $4.00 on the second 
<la\ and $5.00 on the third day. 

\n\one wishing to audit a non-laboratory course I but not receive 

college credit) may do so with permission of the instructor by paying 
a fee of $10.00 per course. 

Tin- tuition for University oi Georgia Extension courses is $5.60 per 
quarter hour. \ registration fee of $1.00 per student per quarter will 
be charged for University of Georgia Extension courses. 



GENER \L INFORM VI ION _13 

\ graduation fee of $7.50 will !»<• collected from each candidate 
for graduation. 

\m\ -indent delinquent in the payment ol am fee due the college 
will have grade reports and transcripts of records held up, and will 
not l>e allowed to re register at the college for a new quarter until the 
delinquency has been removed. 

Kadi student leaving Armstrong College is entitled to one official 
transcript of his college work. The charge for additional copies is 

$1.00 each. 

\n activity fee of $5.00 each quarter will be charged all <la\ Btu- 
dents who arc registered for 10 quarter hours or more. This fee is not 
charged Evening College student- unless thej wish to participate in the 

regular activity program of the college. 

Students taking laboratory work will be required to pa) a fee for 
materials and equipment. This fee is indicated in the description of 
courses found under "Course Descriptions" elsewhere in this bulletin. 

A fee of $2.00 is charged for make-up tests of announced quizzes 
with the following exceptions: 

( 1 1 Illness which is certified by a medical doctor. 
<2i A death in the family. 

1 3 1 Absences incurred while on official business for the 
college. 

Any student who desires to take more than 17 quarter hours per 
quarter must have the approval of his adviser and a "B" average. 

Refunds of fees and tuition will be made ONLY upon written 
application for withdrawal from school. No refunds will he made to 
students dropping a course. The schedule of refunds is given below: 

WITHDRAW \L SCHED1 LE 

WITHDRAWAL DATES Wlni \i DDE TO COLLEGE 

First Session June 13, 14, 15 20% of gross registration fees 

Summer Quarter, June 16, 17 40% of gn>~- registration fees 

1955 June 20, 21. 22 607c of gross registration fees 

June 23, 24. 807r of gross registration fees 

Second Session, July 25. 26. 27 20% of gross registration fees 

Sfimmer Quarter. July 28. 29 407c of gross registration fees 

1955 August 1, 2, 3 60% of gross registration fees 

August 4. 5. 80% of gr<>— n-i-tration fees 

Fall Quarter. 1955 Sept. 19, 20. 21, 22, 23 207c of gross registration fees 

Sept. 26, 27. 28, 29, 30 40% of gross nitration fees 

Oct. 3, 4. 5, 6, 7 60% of gross registration fees 

Oct. 10. 11. 12, 13. 14 80% of gross registration fees 



14 ARMSTRONG COLLEGE OF SAVANN Ml 



Winter Quarter, l ( >.V> Jan. 2, .>. \. .">. (> kv , ,,i gross registration few 

Jan. 9, 10, 11, 12, I I !<»', ol gross registration fees 

Jan. U). 1,. 18. ]9. 20 60^ oi gross registration fees 

Jan. 23, 24, 2.~>. 26. 27 80', of gross registration fees 

Spring Quarter, L956 March 22. 23, 25, 27. 28 20^ oi gross registration fees 

March 2 l ). .'-50. \pr. 2. 3, 1 W ; of gross registratioi 

\ pi i J 5, 6, ( J. 10. 11 60$ oi gross registration fees 

\pril 12. 13, 16, 17. 18 80S of gross registration fees 

Orientation \\i> Advisement 

The counseling and advisement service of Armstrong College of 
Savannah offers help in solving problems connected with the students 
college program. 

Students are urged to request help from their instructors when 
the difficulty is one concerned with the subject itself and having no 
complications. The areas with which the advisor is usually concerned 
are choice of vocation, the planning of work in college, stud) habits 
generally and personal adjustment to college life. Those problems which 
do not fit into these general categories either because of greater inten- 
sity or critical developments are referable to community agencies 
outside the college if this is agreeable to the student and his parents 
or guardians. 

During the year 1952-53 the academic advisement of students was 
distributed among the entire faculty so that each instructor carried the 
responsibility for a proportionate number of the entire student body 
registered in the daytime program. \<1\ isement interviews were sched- 
uled with each student at least once a quarter and appointments for 
these interviews were mailed from the office of the President. These 
interviews were designed to aid the student in planning his program of 
work in college. 

LIBRARY 

The library of Armstrong College is housed in Hodgson Hall on 
the corner of Gaston and Whitaker Streets. All the materials are readily 
available to the students since all books are on open shelves. On the 
main floor is the reference room, with its many volumes of factual in- 
formation. Downstairs is the reading room: this room contains fiction 
biograph\. books in foreign languages, current and bound volume- oi 
periodicals. In addition, the reading room contains a radio-phonograph 
on which the students may hear their favorite records. The workroom 
and office of the Librarian are also downstair-. 

The librarv includes book- of general and for recreational reading. 
At the present time the library's holdings consist of a standard collection 
«»f book- totaling over 13.500 volumes and an extensive collection of 






(,l NERAL INFORMATION L5 



pamphlets on subjects of current interest More than one hundred 
periodicals are received, including four newspapers. In keeping writh 
the purpose of the library to meet the needs of all the Btudents, a begin- 
n in »z: has been made toward a collection of recordings and art print- 
In addition to the resources of the college librarj the students 
have free access to the holdings of the Georgia Historical Society, al-<> 
housed in Hodgson Hall. This library contains the most outstanding 
collection of materials on Georgia and its history as well as a large 
collection of materials on Southern history. The holdings of the His 
toxical Societ) consist of more than ten thousand hook-, eighty periodi- 
cal subscriptions, an extensive mauscript collection, and one of the 
most complete files of Savannah newspapers, dating hack to 1763. 

To further meet their needs. Armstrong students are encouraged to 
use not onl\ the materials available at Hodgson Hall, hut also the Sa- 
vannah Public Library, which has much material of interest, such as its 
large collection of fiction, government documents .and microfilm copies 
of newspapers. 

ARMSTRONG EVENING COLLEGE 

Fully accredited college classes are offered after 6:00 p.m.. Mon- 
day through Friday. Classes meet one, two or three evenings a week, 
according to the amount of credit of the course. 

Students not seeking degrees may enroll in courses on a non-credit 
basis. 

It is possible to enroll for three courses on Monday. Wednesday 
and Friday between the hours of 6:00 and 10:30 p.m., or two courses 
on Tuesday and Thursday at 6:00 and 8:15 p.m.. However, students em- 
ployed during the day are urged to limit their enrollment to one or two 
courses. Eighteen five-hour courses or the equivalent, are required for 
graduation. Students should complete programs of study required of 
candidates for graduation listed elsewhere in this Bulletin under "Curri- 
eulums." 

The dates for refunds in the case of withdrawal listed in this Bulle- 
tin are applicable. When a student is enrolled in more than one course, 
no refund is allowed for dropping a single course. Refunds are made 
onl) in case of withdrawal from the college. 

The cost of tuition, etc., is covered under "fees." Student activit\ 
fees are not assessed evening college students unless then w ish to partici- 
pate in the regular activity program of the college. 



16 ARMSTRONG COLLEGE OF SAVANNAH 

Armstrong Evening College, as successor t«» the Savannah branch 
of the I nivereit) <»f Georgia Off-Campus Center, began operation in 
June, L951. During L954-55 school year more than 600 students en- 
rolled cadi quarter. Veterans are now attending under Public Law- 346 
(World War lli and 550 ("Korean Veterans"). 

Qualified \rmed Service personnel, currently <>n active <lut\. are 
attending with their tuition partialis defrayed 1>\ the services. This is 
arranged through the unit education officer of the service affected. 

Quarterly announcements of Evening College courses, instructors. 
etc., ma) he obtained by addressing requests to the Director. Armstrong 
Evening College, 447 Hull Street. Savannah. Georgia. 

SENIOR COLLEGE COURSES 

Through the Extension Division of the University of Georgia. 
Armstrong Evening College offers upper division courses which can be 
taken for credit, satisfying junior and senior-year requirements for the 
bachelor's degree. A minimum of one year of residence at the Univer- 
sity is required to receive the bachelor's degree. The equivalent of one 
year of senior college work, however, may be completed through exten- 
courses in residence at Armstrong College in certain degree programs. 
Instructors in the extension classes are approved by the heads of the 
departments at the University of Georgia. These courses then carry 
University credit and are recorded in the registrar's office at the Uni- 
versity of Georgia. They are University of Georgia courses taught in 
Armstrong Evening College. (See photostat I See fee section for special 
charges for I niversity of Georgia Extension courses. 

In the past, the courses offered have been the core curriculum for 
the junior year leading toward the Bachelor of Business Administration 
degree. Also, income tax accounting, a second course in business law. 
personnel administration, and other advanced courses in economics and 
business administration have been offered as student demand indicated. 

Junior and senior courses leading to the Bachelor of Arts degree 
are offered in English, literature, history, psychology and sociology. 
Other courses will be added if sufficient student requests warrant. 

Courses required to qualify for State Department Teacher's cer- 
tificates are sometimes offered as upper division courses. Local 
teachers are limited to ninety quarter hours of credit at the junior 
college level. State Department regulations requiring all courses in 
education be taught in teacher-training institutions prevent Armstrong 
College from offering am such courses for credit. 



GENERAL INFORMATION 17 

The University of Georgia 

Office of the Rccistiai 

Athens, Georsu 

April 28, 195U 

TO WHOM IT MAY CONCERN: 

This is to advise that any student may use up to 
a maximum of hS quarter hours credit completed through 
correspondence and extension courses toward a degree 
at the University of Georgia. This may be taken over 
and above the first two years of work whether these 
be completed at a junior college or a senior college. 

Specifically, we will recognize without question 
up to U5 quarter hours credit completed in extension 
courses offered in a joint program sponsored by 
Armstrong College of Savannah and the Division of 
General Extension at the University of Georgia. 



Cordially, 



Walter N. Danner 
WND:cc Registrar 

\idio-Visual Instruction 

Certain classrooms of the college are equipped with screens for 
the showing of films. In the teaching of English, public speaking, for- 
eign languages and music, visual aids are supplemented by recordings. 

Student Assist a \ i - 

The college employes a number of student assistants each year. 
These students work in the library, science laboratories, business offices 
and with the faculty. Those who desire such employment should appl\ 
to the staff member who is in charge of the work in which he is 
interested or to the President of the college. 

Scholarships 

The scholarships which are available to students are listed below. 



18 ARM>Ti;o\<; COLLEGE OF SAVANNAH 

Application blanks ma) be Becured from the President's office in the 
Armstrong College. Those who wrish to appl) for scholarships for 
tin- Bchool year beginning in September should file an application in 
the President's office not later than Jul\ 15. All applicants are required 
to appear before an oral interview hoard during the month <>f August. 
Each applicant will be notified when to appear for this interview. 

( n\lM|ss|n\ _ 8 for $100.00 ,- a < h. 

rhese are work scholar-hip-. Students who hold them spend a few hour- 
each week a- assistants in the library, laboratory or in the administrative offices. 
In Borne instances it i- possible to tarn more than §100.00 a year. 

\RTHUR LUCAS MEMORIAL — 5 or $100.00 each. 

JUNIOR CHAMBER OF COMMERCE — 2 for $100.00 each. 

One is for a sophomore and one is for a freshman. 

EDWARD McGUIRE GORDON MEMORIAL — 1 for $200.00. (Men only 
arc eligible to apply.) 

SAVANNAH GAS COMPANY ENGINEERING — 1 for $100.00. (Men 
only are eligible to apply). 

SAVANNAH GAS COMPANY HOME ECONOMICS — 2 for $100.00 
each. (Women only are eligible to apply). 

Placement Ser\i< i 

I he college maintains a placement service for the benefit of em- 
ployers and students. Anyone seeking part-time employment while in 
college, or full-time employment after leaving college, should place his 
name on file with the Business Office. 

Commencement Exercises 

Commencement exercises are held each year in June. At this time 
the degree of Associate in Arts is awarded to those students who have 
met the requirements for graduation, and recognition is given to those 

who qualify for scholastic honors. The Faculty and Graduates partici- 
pate in full academic dress. 

Student Center 

The college does not operate a boarding department. The Student 
Center in the Hunt Building is open throughout the day and provides 
light lunches at reasonable prices. The Center also provides recreational 
facilities and houses the Book Store. 

Student Activities 

The entire program of student activities at the college is designed 
to contribute to the development of the whole individual and to assist 
In ni in becoming an active and helpful member of the community. 
The college feels that students should take the responsibility for direct- 
ing their own affairs. The senate is the governing student board of 
Vrmstrong College. This organization is made up of elected representa- 
tive- of all student groups. It is the function of the Senate to Co- 



(I \l K AL INFO RMATION L9 

ordinate, direcl and control -"indent organizations and activities ai 
Armstrong. 

\ I IN I I K - 

Basketball is the <>nl\ sport in which the college fields an inter- 
collegiate team. \ll other -port- at the college are on an intramural 
basis. 

PhYSH \i. Kim CATION PROGRAM 

Ml regular da\ student-, except veterans, are required to partici 
pate in a physical education program. Intramural competition is offered 
in such sports as basketball, volleyball, swimming, football, tennis, 
Softball and pingpong. All are encouraged to take part in this program. 

Publication- 

The college publishes the Inkwell, a newspaper; and the Geechee, 
a \earbook. These afford students an opportunity to express their 
opinions on a wide variety of topics, to do creative writing and gain 
practice in other journalistic activities. 

The Armstrong College Masquers 

The Armstrong College Masquers, with a charter membership of 
over seventy students, was organized in the Fall of 1950, after the 
Savannah Playhouse separated from Armstrong College and was reor- 
ganized as The Little Theatre, Inc. 

The Masquer organizations goal is to furnish enjoyment and appre- 
ciation of the drama for both participants and spectators through a 
balanced presentation of popular and classic theatre. 

Masquer membership is open to all students interested in any phase 
of the theatre: acting, designing, lighting, make-up. costuming, and 
other production skills. 

An affiliate of the Masquers is the Armstrong Radio Workshop, 
formed to offer interested students an opportunity to develop techniques 
of radio broadcasting. 

Glee Club 

The Armstrong Glee Club was organized in September, 1949. Its 
members are drawn from the student body and faculty. Besides giving 
two complete concerts at the college, one at Christmas and one in the 
Spring, the group has sung for many civic groups in Savannah. The 
Glee Club has also produced musicals with the Armstrong Masquers. 



General Regulations 

\|t\ [SEMEN l WD PLA< EMENT TESTS 

To help a studenl select a definite objective earl) in lii^ college 
program, the Armstrong >taff administers to each entering freshman 
a series <»( interest, aptitude, and achievement tests. In the Fall, these 
are given during Freshman Week and are scored prior to the student's 
interview with an adviser. On the basis of these objective measure- 
ments, the student's previous record, his interest and his family coun- 
sel, the student with the aid of his adviser decides on a program of 
stud) which will enable him to accomplish his purpose. 

Physical Examinations 

Each da) school student must submit a completed physical exami- 
nation report on the forms furnished by the college before he can 
complete his registration. A chest X-ray is also required. On the basis 
of the examination, the physical education director will adapt a pro- 
gram of training and recreation to individual requirements. This regu- 
lation is not applicable to students enrolled in the Evening College. 

Course Load 

The unit of work for a regular student is 16-17 quarter hours per 
quarter. A normal schedule of sixteen quarter hours presupposes that 
the average student will devote approximately forty-eight hours per 
week to his college classes and to his preparation therefor. 

K\< » pt in engineering, permission to enroll for more than 17 quar- 
ter hours will be granted only to students who have a "B" average for 
the preceding quarter. The quarter just prior to graduation, a student 
may take an extra course which is necessary to meet requirements for 
graduation. No student will be allowed to register for more than 21 
hours in any one quarter. 

\ D mission to Class 

Students will be admitted to class when the instructor is furnished 
an official class card indicating that he has completed his registration 
and paid his fees in the Business Office. 

Conduct 

Compliance with the regulations of the faculty and the Armstrong 
College Commission is assumed. The use on the campus of intoxicat- 
ing beverages, gambling, and hazing are prohibited. 

Reports \m> Grades 
I i is Fell l>\ Armstrong that students in college should be held 



GENERAL INFORMATION 21 



accountable f«>r their own scholarship. Vccordingly, report cards, warn 
ing> of deficienl scholarship and other such notices are nol senl <>ut 
!.. parents 01 guardians l»\ the college excepl on request. Instead the 
students themselves receive these reports and are expected t<« contact 
their advisers whenever their work i- unsatisfactory. Reporl cards are 
issued at the end <»f cadi quarter. Reports <>f failing grades are issued 
in the middle »>f each quarter Each student has access to an advise] 
and in addition, the Registrar, and all instructors are available to help 
and advise an) -indent seeking assistance. 

Reports are based on the following system <>f grading: 

\ plus Exceptional 4 honor points per quarter hour 

\ Excellent 3 honor points per quarter hour 

I) Good 2 honor points per quarter hour 

C Fair 1 honor point per quarter hour 

i> Poor No honor points per quarter hour 

I. Incomplete Incomplete must be removed hefore 

mid term of the following quarter 

F Failure Course must he repeated 

W Withdrew Course must be repeated 

W F \\ Undrew Failing Course must be repeated 

\ -tudent who receives an "E" (incomplete grade) should con- 
sult his instructor at once and arrange to complete the requirements 
of the course. An "E" grade which has not been removed by the mid- 
dle of the succeeding quarter automatically becomes an "F". An "E" 
grade becomes an "F" if the course is repeated. 

A student who receives an "E" grade in the Evening Program 
will have one year in which to complete the requirements of the course. 
If the "E" grade is not removed within this time, it automatically be- 
comes and "F". An "E" grade becomes an "F" if the course is repeated 

Honors 

Students who have been in attendance for three consecutive quar- 
ters taking a normal load and achieving an average grade of "B" or 
better wi'h no grade below that of "C" will be placed on the Perma- 
nent Dean's List. This list is published each June in the commencement 
program. 

Graduates who meet the requirements for the Permanent Dean- 
List and who are graduating with an average of three honor points 
per quarter hour, will be designated as graduating summa cum laude 
i with highest distinction). The designation cum laude I with distinc 
tion) will be bestowed upon those meeting the above requirements 
with an average of two honor points per quarter hour. 

A valedictorian will be selected by the graduating class from the 






22 ARMSTRONG COLLEGE OF SAVANNAH 

five students with the highest scholastic averages in the work com- 
pleted before tin" term in which the students graduate. 

Students taking a normal load who make a grade of "B" or 
better in each course during any quarter will he plated on the Dean's 
Scholastic Attainment List. 

Students in the Evening Program taking 10 hours or more during 
an) quarter who make a grade of "B"' or better in each course will 
be placed on the Dean's Scholastic Attainment List. 

Attendant e 

Students are expected to attend classes as scheduled. \n\ absence, 



w 



hatsoever. from class work entails a loss to the student. 



A student who has been absent from class for a valid reason should 
have the absence excused with a written statement to his instructor who 
will initial it. The student will then file this form in the Registrars 
office. Excuses must be submitted within seven days from the date the 
student returns to school: otherwise the absence will not be excused. 

\ student who has unexcused absences equal in number to the 
times the class meets in one week, and has one additional unexcused 
absence, will be dropped from class. The instructors will notif\ the 
Registrar's office when a student should be dropped. The Registrar's 
office will notify the student. Grades assigned to those who have been 
dropped will either be W or W/F. depending on the status of the 
student at the time he is dropped from class. 

Beginning with the Fall quarter of the 1955-56 session, students 
will he charged with absences incurred by late registration in the 
college as indicated in the current bulletin and these absences carry 
the same penalty as the other absences from a course. 

Attendance at bi-weekly assemblies is required. 
Withdrawals 

A formal withdrawal, presented to the President in writing, is a 
pre-requisite for honorable dismissal from, or re-entrance into, this 
institution. Anv student planning to withdraw should immediately make 
such intentions known to the administration of the college in writing. 
This notice is required to receive any authorized refunds. 

In order that a student ma\ not receive a failing grade on his 
permanent record card in the Registrar - office, he should formalh 
withdraw from any class which he discontinues l»\ securing the in- 
structor's written approval. This written approval should be filed in 
the Registrars office. 



Gl \l R \l IM ORMATIOIS 



Dismissal 

\m\ Btudenl failing (except in cases excused before examinations 
<>ii account <>f illness) to pasa at least one course other than physical 
education in an] one quarter will be dropped from the rolls of the 
college. \n\ student who fails to make an average of at least 0.6 bonor 
points per quarter hour in all work scheduled during the fir<t three 
quarters work at the college will not !><■ allowed to re-register. \\ ith 
drawal is recommended to all students who have less than a "C" aver- 
age at the end of the fourth quarter. \t the end of the >i\th quarter's 
work a Btudenl musl nave a 0.8 bonor point per quarter hour average 
in order to re-register. 

Student- who have been asked to withdraw on account of academic 
deficiency will be re-admitted to Armstrong if the student goes to 
another college for one quarter and maintains a "C" average. If a 
student does not go to another college he may re-register at Armstrong 
after two quarters. He re-enters on probation for one quarter, during 
which quarter he must make a U C" average. 

Requirements for Graduation 

The requirements for graduation from Armstrong College of Sa- 
vannah are listed below: 

1. The student will complete a program of studv listed under 
"CURRICILUMS" with an average grade 'of "C". Any 
exceptions to a program may be referred by a student's 
advisor to the Committee on Academic Standing. 

2. One-third of the work required for graduation will be 
completed at Armstrong College of Savannah. 

3. Not more than one-fourth of the total work required for 
graduation will consist of correspondence course credit 
and credit for Armed Services Experience. 

Candidates for graduation will make application in the Registrar's 
office two quarters prior to the expected date of graduation. 

Recommendations 

The recommendations issued by the college are based on the 
grades the student earns, his student activity record, and the opinions 
expressed by his instructors on a special student rating form. 

The files of the Registrars office which include all permanent 
records are consulted regularly by representatives of the Federal Bu- 
reau of Investigation, the Civil Service, the local Credit Bureau and 
other agencies having access to confidential records. A good college 
record is of vital importance to a student. 



Curriciilums 



General 

Before registration, tin- student should PLAN A PROGRAM OF 
STl I)Y WITH AN ADVISER. Even if a student knows what courses 
are required for graduation, lie should have on record in the office of 
his adviser a cop) of his program. In order for a student to make any 
changes in his planned program he must consult his adviser. The 
adviser and the Registrar will check a student's program and it will 
be approved two quarters prior to the expected date of graduation. 

The Associate in Arts degree is conferred upon all students who 
complete at Armstrong College of Savannah one of the programs out- 
lined in the catalog. 

If a student plans to transfer to another institution either before 
or after graduation it is essential that he determine what courses must 
be completed at Armstrong in order to conform with the degree re- 
quirement of the institution to which he wishes to transfer. 



The Core Curriculum 

There are certain bodies of knowledge and certain skills indispen- 
sable to every college trained man and woman. The understanding of 
one's environment and man's struggle to adapt it to useful ends, the 
ability to communicate his thoughts and feelings: right group-attitudes 
and coordinated physical activity — these objectives are set up in the 
following courses required of all students desiring to graduate. 

Freshman year: English 11-12-13 (lllx-112y>: History 11-12-13 
(lllx-112y) ; ten quarter hours of natural sciences, and Phvsical Edu- 
cation 11-12-13. 

Sophomore year: Sophomore English and three quarters of 
physical education. Students enrolled in certain terminal courses des- 
cribed below mav substitute English 20 and English 28 for English 
21 and 22. 

Students graduating in less than the six quarters of the regular 
session mav reduce their phvsical education requirements accordingly. 
Phvsical education should be taken in the proper sequence and two 
courses should not be scheduled in am one quarter. 



CI RRIC1 1. 1 MS 



Concentration— Accounting Three-Year Terminal Program 

1'ik- i Yeah Second Yi in 
English 11. L2, 13 Freshman English 9 English 20, 28 oi English 

Histon 11. 12. 13 Western 21, 22 10 

Civilization 9 Physical Education .'J 

Physical Education 11. 12, 13 3 Economics 21, 21 Principles 

Science' 10 and Problems lo 

Business Administration 21. 25 Business Administration 27. 28 

(Accounting) 10 Business law .10 

Electives 7 •Elective* 15 

TOTAL 48 TOTAL 18 

Third i ear 

Business Administration 34 Intermediate Accounting 5 

Business Administration 36. 37— Income Tax Accounting 10 
Business Administration 29- Cosl Accounting or Business 

Administration 35 — Intermediate Accounting •> 

Economies 30 — Personnel Administration 3 

Mathematics 3 

Electives 13 

TOTAL 45 

Concentration— Business Administration General 

Three-Year Terminal Program 

A student who cannot transfer to a senior college at the end of 
his second year may get a broader foundation for work as a supervisor 
or junior executive by completing the program below. 

First Yeak Second Year 

English lllx, 112y— Freshman English 121x. 122y— World Literature 

English 10 or English 128 — Public Speaking 

History lllx, 112y, Western and Business Administration 115 — 

Civilization 10 Business Correspondence 10 

Natural Science 10 Business Administration 124. 125 — 

Economics 121. 124 10 Elementary Accounting 10 

Elective 5 Business Administration 127 

(E-370) — Business Law "> 

Business Administration and 

Commerce Electives 10 

Five Electives 10 

Third Year 

Student will select with an advisor seven of the following subjects 

Business Administration 128 (E-371) — Business Law (2nd course) 5 

Business Administration 160 ( E-350) — Principles of Management . ... 5 

Business Administration 161 (E-386) — Principles of Insurance 5 

Business Administration 162 (E-390) — Real Estate Principles 5 

Business Administration 151 — Principles of Transportation 5 

Business Administration 164 (E-431) — Investments 5 



* Students planning to complete the three year program should substitute 
10 hours in accounting for electives. 






ARMSTRONG I OLLEGE 01 -\\ WWII 



Economics L25 Elementarj Economic Statistics 

omics li^> (E-333) American Economic History 

Economics 1 —7 (E-326) Monej and Banking 

Economics L28 l 160) Principles of Marketing 

Economics 129 (E-386) Labor Economics 

Economics 131 (E-444) Government and Business 



CONCENTRA1 ION 
Bl SIN1 5S \l»\il\!>l R \ l l«>\ 
Firs i "» i \a 
English 11. 12, 13 Freshman English 9 
Histon 11, 12, l.i Western 

( .\\ ilization . 9 

Physical Education 11, 12. 13 3 

Laboratoi j Science 10 

Mathematics 16 — College Ugebra . 5 

Mathematics 19 — Finance 3 

Electives 9 



Senior College Preparatory 

v l .< <»ND ^ EAR 

English 21, 22 Sophomi 

English 1" 

Physical Education . 3 

Business \dmini-tration--24. 25 — 

Accounting 10 

Economics 21, 24 — Principles and 

Problems LO 

Political Science 13 — Govt. <>f 1 



Electives 



Ki 



TOTAL 



48 



rOTAl 



18 



Concentration— Business Administration Terminal 

Many students will not continue their formal education after 
leaving Armstrong. To these students the college gives the opportunity 
to select those subject- which have a vocational value. Sufficient 
general education is included in the core curriculum to make this a 
well-rounded program. 

Si < <>M» V EAR 
English 21, 22 — Sophomore English 

or English 20. 28 10 

Physical Education 3 

Business Administration 24. 2.i 

Accounting .10 

Business Administration 27 — 

Business Law 5 

Business Administration and 
Commerce Electives 10 

T\ pintr 

Calculator and Comptometer 
Shorthand 

Business Administration 26 — 
Intermediate Acct. 
Business Administration 28 — 
Business 1 aw 
Electives (other) 10 

TOTAL 48 rOTAL 48 

Concentration— Industrial Management Senior College Prep. 
This program will satisf\ degree requirements for the firs! two 
years of this field of engineering. 



First Year 
English 11. 12. 13 — Freshman 

Enilish 9 

History 11. 12. 13— Western 

Civilization 9 

Physical Education 11. 12. 13 3 

Natural Science 10 

Economics 21. 24 — Principles 

and Problems 10 

Electives 7 



* A student should consult the catalog ol his prospective senioi college foi 
required subjects. Colleges differ as to what subjects are required for this 
i ourse. 



CI RRH l LI \l- 



2: 



Final \ i \i; Si 1 ono ^ 1 \i; 

Chemistry 11. L5 General 12 Economics 21, 24 Principle! 

English II. 12, 13 Freshman 9 Economic* and Problem* <>f 

Engineering II. 12 Drawing 6 Economic* 1" 

Engineering 19 Descriptive English 21, 22 Sophomore English 10 

Geometry 3 Business Administration 24, 25 

Histon 11. 12, 13 Western Principles ol Accounting 10 

Qviliiation (01 Modern Physics LI, L2 General Physi 12 

language) l > Mathematics \ ( > Mathematics of 

Mathematics U>. 17. KS Coll< Finance 

Ugebra, Trigonometry and Biology M\. 15A I" 

Analytic Geometry 1") Physical Education 3 

Physical Education 11, 12. 13 3 

lo I'M 57 TOTA1 58 

Concentration— Science Senior College Preparatory 

This course of stud\ is designed for those students who wish to 
major in the fields of Chemistry, Physics <»r Mathematics. \i the time 
of registration the student must specif) his major field, and it will be 
indicated at the time of graduation on the permanent record cards. 

This program is so constructed that only slight variation- arc 
necessar\ to prepare a student for his particular major and it is the 
responsibility of each student to see that his program of study conform- 
to his senior college requirements. A minimum of 96 quarter hours 
is required for graduation. 

First Year Second } ear 

English 11. 12. 13 — Freshman English 21. 22 — Sophomore 

English 9 English 10 

History 11. 12. 13— Western Physical Education 3 

Civilization 9 Physics 11. 12— General 12 

Physical Education 11. 12, 13 3 French or German 10 

Mathematics 16 — College Algebra.. 5 Electives and Major Requirements 

Mathematics 17 — Trigonometry. 5 
Elective and Major Requirements. . 

The above courses are required of all students enrolling in this 
concentration. 

M\JOR REQUIREMENTS: 

Major in Mathematics: Chemistrj 25— (Quantitative AnaK-i- 

Mathematics 18 — Plane Analytic Mathematics 18— -Plane Analytic 

Geometry Geometry 

Chemistry or Biology (10 hr-. Major in Physic-: 

minimum)) Mathematics 18 — Plane \nal\ti< 

Major in Chemistry: Geometry 

Chemistry Ik 15 — General Chemist rj Chemistry or Biology 1 10 hr-. 

Chemistry 24 — Qualitative Analysis , minimum) 

Concentration— Medical Technology 

Senior College Preparatory 

This program is designed for those students who wish to ohtain 

their first two vears toward a Bachelor of Science in Medical Tech- 



28 



ARMSTRONG COLLEGE OF SAVANNAH 



nology. \n Associate in \rl> i> awarded upon successful completion of 

the academic program described below 



FlRSI ^ BAB 

English 11, 12, 13 9 

Historj 11, 12, 13 9 

Physical Education 11. 12. and 13 . 3 

Mathematics 16, 17 10 

Biologj M. 1-") 10 

Chemistn 14, 15 12 



TOTAL 



53 



Si I OND \ EAR 

English 21, 22 
Physical Education 

Biology 23 
Chemistn 24, 25 
Physics 11. 12 
French or German 

TOTAL 



10 
3 
6 
12 
12 
10 

53 



Concentration— Medical Technology Terminal 

This is a two year program designed for those students who wish 
to meet the requirements of the American Society of Clinical Patholo- 
gists and who will complete their training at some approved school of 
Medical Technology. An Associate in Arts is awarded upon successful 
completion of the academic program described below. 

First Year 



English 11, 12. 13 9 

History 11, 12, 13 9 

Physical Education 11. 12 and 13 . 3 

Mathematics 16 5 

Biology 14. 15 12 

Chemistry 14. 15 12 



TOTAL 



50 



Concentration— Pre-Denta I 



Second i ear 

English 21, 22 10 

Physical Education 3 

Biology 23 6 

Biology 22 6 

or 

Bacteriology In. 2n 6 

Chemistry 24, 25 12 

Electives 10 

TOTAL 47 

Senior College Preparatory 



This program is designed for those students who wish to prepare 
themselves for the study of Dentistry after completing three or more 
years of academic studies. An Associate in Arts is awarded upon suc- 
cessful completion of the academic program described below. 

English 21. 22 10 

Physical Education 3 

Biology 23 6 

Chemistry 24. 25 12 

Physics 11, 12 12 

French or German 10 

TOTAL 53 

Senior College Preparatory 



English 11. 12. 13 9 

History 11. 12. 13 9 

Physical Education 11. 12, 13 3 

Mathematics In. 17 10 

Biology 14, 15 10 

Chemistry 14. 15 12 



TOTAL 
Concentration— Pre-Medica 



53 



This program is designed for those students who wish to prepare 
themselves f»>r the stud) of Medicine after completing three or more 
years of academic studies. An Associate in Arts is awarded upon suc- 
cessful completion of the academic program described below. 



( I RRIC1 LI MS 





Si . ONO 


^ i u; 




9 


English 21, 22 




1U 


<; 


Physical Education 






3 


Biologj 23 




6 


in 


( hemistrj 24, 25 




12 


10 


Physics 11. 12 




12 


12 


French •►! (.••nn.ni 




10 



Firsi "> i \i; 
English 11. 12. L3 
Historj 11. 12. 13 
Physical Education 11. 12. 13 
Mathematics 16, IT 
Biolog] M. L5 
( hemisti \ 1 1. 15 

TOTA1 53 TOTA) 

Concentration — Pre-Nursing Senior College Preparatory 

This is a one-year program for those students who wish t<> obtain 

their freshman requirements t<> be transferred to a school <>f nursing 
offering a B.S. in Nursing. 

English 11. 12. 13 9 

History 11. 12. 13 9 

( hemistrj 14 6 

Mathematics 16 5 

Physical Education 11. 12, 13 3 

\n\ three of the following: 

English 28 

Political Science 13 

Psychology 21 

Sociology 20 15 

TOTAL 47 

Concentration— Pre-Optometry Senior College Preparatory 

The requirements for admission to the schools and colleges of 
optometry in the Lnited States are relatively uniform but are not 
identical. The practice of optometry in all states is regulated by Boards 
of Examiners in Optometry. The following concentration will prepare 
a student for transfer to any school or college of optometry in the 
United States and Canada. 
First Year 

English 11, 12, 13 9 

History 11. 12. 13 9 

Physical Education 11. 12. 13 3 

Mathematics 16, 17 10 

Biology 14. 15 10 

Chemistry 14. 15 12 

TOTAL 53 

Concentration— Pre-Pharmacy 

This is a one-year concentration for those students who wish to 
obtain their freshman requirements for entrance to a school of phar- 
macy. The regional schools of pharmacy require three years minimum 
in residence at the School of Pharmacy. 

English 11. 12. 13 9 

History 11. 12. 13 9 



English 21. 
Physical Ed 
Biology 23 
Physics 11, 
Mathematics 
Sociok>i:\ X 


M.i OND ^ EAR 

22 

ucation 

12 
18 
Psychology 


10 

3 

6 

12 

.5 

10 


TOTAL 


16 


Sen 


ior 


College Preparatory 






ARMSTRONG COLLEGE OF SA> \\\ Ml 



Chemistry I • • 15 
Anatomj In. 2n, 3n 

..I 
Biolog] H>. 17 
Physical Education 11, 12, 13 
Mathematics L6 



12 
9 

In 
3 
5 



lul \1. 47 or 48 

Concentration— Pre-Veterinary Senior College Preparatory 

This is a one-year program for those students who wish to obtain 

tin ir Freshman requirements to be transferee" to a Benior institution. 

Some colleges and universities require a veterinary student to begin 
specializing in his second year. If a student desires a well rounded 
foundation for the stud) of veterinary medicine it is recommended 
that he pursue the two vear pre-Medical program. 

English 11, 12, 13 .' 9 

History 11, 12, 13 9 

Chemistr; 11. 15 12 

Biology 14, 15 10 

Pliwcal Education 11, 12, 13 3 

Mathematics 16, 17 10 

TOTAL 53 

Concentration— Commerce Secretarial Terminal 

This program is designed to meet the needs of those students who 
wish to qualify for clerical positions in business. 

First Year Second Year 

English 11, 12. 13 — Freshman Business Administration 24 — 

English 9 \< counting 5 



Histon 11. 12. 13— Western 

Civilization 9 

Physical Education 11, 12, 13 3 

Natural Science 10 

Commerce 11 a-b-c — Typing 6 

Commerce 12 a-b-c — Shorthand .15 

TOTAL 52 

Concentration— Home Economics 

First Year 
English 11. 12. 13— Freshman English 9 
History 11. 12, 13— Western 

( i\ilization 9 

Physical Education 11, 12, 13 3 

Home Economics 10a — Orientation: 

Careers 3 

Home Economics 10b — Orientation: 

Personal Development 3 

Home Economics 11 — Clothing 5 

\rt 11 — Creative 5 

Laboratory Science 10 



* English 20— Composition 5 
Commerce 17 — Office Practice 5 
Commerce 21 a-b-c — Typing 6 
Commerce 22 a-b-c — Shorthand 15 

* English 28— Public Speaking 
Physical Education 3 

TOTAL 44 

Senior College Preparatory 
Second "» bar 

English 21. 22— Sophomore English 10 
Phyisical Education 3 

Hume Economics 12 — Family Meal 

Planning and Serving 
Home Economics 21 — Home Planning 

and Decorating 5 

Home Economics 24 — Familv 

Fundamentals 5 

Social Studies 10 

v < ience Electives 6 

Mathematics 10 or 16 . 5 



TOTAL 



17 



TOTA1 



19 



: English 21. 22 mav be substituted for these English courses. 



( l i;i;i< i II MS 



31 



Concentration— Home Economics 

Tin- course is designed to mee 
plan to complete their college work 
are allowed in enable the student i< 
have a vocational value or cultural 
time. 

FlRSI \ I LB 

English II. 12, 13 Freshman English^ 
Historj 11. 12. 13 Western 

< i\ ilization 9 

Ph\ sical Education 3 

Natural Science 10 

I Human Biology Included I 
Home Economics lOfa Orientation: 

Persona] Development 3 

Home Economics 1 1 t Hothing 5 

Psychology 21 — Introductory 5 

Elective 4 



Terminal 

i the needs "I those women who 
at Armstrong. Sufficient electives 
> select commerce subjects which 
subjects for worth) use of Leisure 

Second 5 1 is 
English 21. 22 Sophomore English lo 
Physical Education 3 

Home Economics 21 Home Planning 

ami Decorating 5 

Home Economics 21 Family 

Fundamentals .... 5 

Home Economics 12 Family Meal 

Planning and Serving 5 

Electives 20 



TOTAL 



18 



TOTAL 



18 



Concentration— Physical Education Senior College Preparatory 

The Physical Education Department is qualified to provide the 
first two years of preparation for a major in the field of health and 
physical education for those students planning to enter the field of 
physical education or supervised recreation. 



Second Year 
English 21. 22 — Sophomore English 10 

Physical Education 3 

Anatomy and Physiology 

In, 2n, 3n 9 

**Physical Education 23 — Senior 

Lift- Saving and Swimming 2 

Physical Education 14 — 

Officiating of Basketball 2 

Psychology 21 — Introductory 5 

Psychology 23— Child 
Sociology 21 — Marriage and 

the Family 5 

Electives 

TOTM. If. 

Senior College Preparatory 

This program is recommended for candidates for an \.T>. degree. 
^re-education, pre-law, pre-ministerial, journalism, and other pre- 
professional concentrations. 



First Year 
English 11. 12, 13— Freshman English 9 
History 11, 12, 13— Western 

Civilization 9 

Physical Education 11. 12. 13 3 

* Mathematics 10 

'Mathematics 16 — College Algebra 
•Mathematics 17 — Trigonometry. . 10 

Physics or Chemistry 12 

Home Economics In — Nutrition 4 

Electives 3 



TOTAL 50 

Concentration— Liberal Arts 



::: The student may take either Mathematics 10 and Mathematics 16 or 
Mathematics 16 and Mathematics 17. 

**The student is exempt from this course provided he has a Red Cross 
Senior Life Saving certificate. 



12 VRMSTRONG COLLEGE OF SAVANN Ml 



FlRSI ^ l \i: S» OMD "l BAH 

English 11. 12. 13 Freshman English 9 English 21, 22 Sophomore English lo 
Histon Hi 12. 13 Western Physical Education 3 

Civilization 9 Two <>f the following courses: 10 

Physical Education 11. 2. 3 -\ Historj 25 Recent European 

Laboratory Science 10 Political Science 13 Gov't, of I. S. 

Mathematics 16 -College Algebra 5 Psychology 21— Introductory. 

Mathematics 17 Trigonometry 5 ologj 20 Introductory 

foreign I anguage 10 Economics 21 — Principles 

^< ience lo 

Electives 12 

TOTAL 51 TOTAL 15 

Concentration— Liberal Arts Terminal 

\ student in the Liberal Arts. Terminal program may select the 
remainder of his electives from courses offered by the college in order 
to prepare for a vocation or to pursue a special interest. 

First Year Second Yeah 

English 11, 12. 13— Freshman English 9 Fnglfeh 21, 22 — Sophomore Engli-h 10 
Histon 11. 12. 13— Western Physical Education 3 

Civilization 9 * Elect i\<-- 35 

Physical Education 11, 12. 13 3 

Natural Science 10 

Mathematics 10 or 16 5 

-Electives 12 

TOTAL . . 48 TOTAL 48 

Concentration— Transportation 

\- a communications center. Savannah offers many opportunities 
to students trained in traffic and transportation management. A Com- 
mittee of experts from business, industry, the railroads and truck lines, 
in consultation with the evening college staff, proposed the professional 
classes listed below. 

B \ 151 — Introduction to Transportation 5 

B \ 152 — Elementary Rates and Tariffs 5 

B \ 153 -Intermediate Rates and Tariff- 5 

B \ 154 — Advanced Rates and Tariffs 5 

B \ 155 — Interstate Commerce Law 5 

I! \ 156 — Interstate Commerce Commission and Public Service 

Commission Procedure 5 

Economics 121 and 124 — Principles and Problems 10 

English lllx and 112v — Freshman English 10 

English 121 x and 122y— World Literature or English 128— 

Public Speaking and BA 113 — Business Correspondence 10 



* A student applying for admission to a senior college which does not require 
the amount indicated of this subject ma\. with the approval of his adviser, sub- 
stitute other courses required 1>\ the senior institution during his first two year-. 
\ studenl must elect 20 hour- from at least three of the following de- 
partment-: Foreign Language, Political Science. Economics. Fine Arts. Home 
Economics. Psychology, Sociology, Mathematics 'other than Math. 19). 



CI RRIC1 1. 1 MS 



lli-h.iN I IK md 112) Western < ivilization l<» 

Natural Sciences 10 

Elective* LO 

rOTAl 90 

One Year Programs 
Concentration — Business Administration 

\ one year program in Business Administration for those person! 
who nm\ not wish to complete the two year concentration, with em- 
phasis on business courses. \ certificate will be awarded t<> those who 
successful!) complete the program. 

Business Administration 24, 25, 34 1 5 

Economics 21, 24 10 

Business Administration 27 5 

English 5 

Mathematics 5 

Physical Education 3 

Elective 5 

TOTAL 48 

Concentration— Transportation 

Fifty-hour Concentration in Transportation. 

Students wishing a thorough background in transportation ma\ 
receive a certificate upon satisfactory completion of the program that 
follows: 

B \ 151 — Introduction to Transportation 5 

B \ 152 —Elementary Rates anil Tariffs 5 

BA 153 — intermediate Rates and Tariffs 5 

BA 154 — Advanced Rates and Tariffs 5 

BA 155 — Interstate Commerce Law 5 

BA 156 — Interstate Commerce Commission and Public 

Service Commission Procedure 5 

Economics 121 and 124 — Principles and Problems 10 

English lllx and 112y — Freshman English or English 128 — Public 

Speaking and BA 115 — Business Correspondence 10 

TOTAL 50 

Concentration— Engineering Senior College Preparatory 

This program will satisfy degree requirements for the first year 
of most types of engineering but should be varied for certain degrees 
such as chemical, electrical, etc. The student should obtain a catalog 
from the senior college he plans to attend and check this program 
against the requirements. The courses required for the freshman 
year have been worked out in consultation with the Georgia Institute 
of Technology. A certificate will be awarded to those who successful!) 
complete the program. 



34 ARMSTRONG COLLEGE OF SAVANNAH 

< ihemisti \ II. I.~> ( reneral 12 

English 11. \2. 13 Freshman ( j 

Engineering 1 1, \2 Drawing 

Engineering 19 Descriptive Geometrj 3 

History II. 12. 13 — Western Civilization '"i Modern Language) 9 
Mathematics 16, 17, 18 — College Algebra, Trigonometrj ami 

Analytic Geometrj 15 

Physical Education 11, 12, 13 3 

TOTAL 57 

Concentration— Stenographic 

A student who has <>nl\ one year to spend in college ina\ herein 
acquire some of the skills which will enable him to earn a livelihood. 

Commerce 11 a. b, c — Typing 6 

Commerce 12 a. b, c — Shorthand IS 

Commerce 17 — Office Practice 5 

Business Administration 24— Accounting 5 

* * English 20 — Composition 5 

** English 28 — Public Speaking 5 

* Physical Education 11, 12, 13 3 

Commerce 13a. b, c 6 

TOTAL 50 

Concentration— Nursing 

Armstrong College offers the following courses in cooperation 
with the Warren A. Candler School of Nursing. With the permission 
of the instructor and the approval of the student's adviser, a student 
not enrolled in the School of Nursing may take any of the following 
courses: 

Anatomy and Physiology In, 2n, 3n 9 

Chemistry In 5 

Sociology In 5 

Physical Education In 1 

Bacteriology In. 2n 6 

Home Economics In 4 

I'-yrhology In 5 

TOTAL 35 



* Physical Education i- required in all one year terminal proi:iam~ it a 
certificate is desired. 

**EnglMi 11. 12. and 13 may be substituted for English 20 and 28. 



Course Descriptions 

General 

Armstrong College reserves the right to (1) withdraw an) course 

for which less than ten students register, (2) limit the enrollment in 
an) course or class section, (3) fi\ the time of meeting of all classes 

and sections, and ill offer BUch additional courses as demand and 

staff personnel warrant 

\.. credit will l»e given in beginning course-, in commerce and 
languages where the same or similar courses have been presented tor 

admission from high school 

Where two or more course- are listed under one description, no 

credit for graduation will he given until the sequence i- completed. 

Courses which are offered in the da\ program are assigned a iium- 
her which i> less than 100. \ll Evening College courses are numbered 
above 100. In course descriptions these numbers appear in parentheses. 
\ft( r each course name, there are three numbers in parentheses. The 
first number listed is the number of hours of lecture; the second, the 
number of hours of laboratory and the third, the number of quarter 
hours of credit the course carries. For example: Biology 16-17 (116- 
117i Human Biology (5-0-5). 

The quarters indicating when courses will be taught appl\ to the 
da) sessions onh. not the Evening College. 

ART 

Art 11 — Creative Art (2-6-5). Spring. 

Drawing, art principles and design with work in other media at the 
discretion of the instructor. Some application will be made to poster- 
making, lettering and ever\da\ life needs. 

Art 113 — Ceramics I 5-0-5 I . Each quarter. Laboratory fee. $2.00. 

\ beginners course. Instruction is concerned with learning to 
handle clay, to form pottery and sculpture, and to decorate, glaze and 
fire the pieces made. 

Art 114 — Ceramics anil Sculpture i 5-0-5 l . Ever) quarter. Labora- 
tory fee. S2.00. 

Instruction in methods of working with clay and glazes, plaster 
of paris and other materials. The creative approach to design in 
pottery and sculptor is emphasized. 

irt 115 — Drawing and Painting i 5-0-5 i. Laboratory fee, $2.00. 

A course in the elements of pictorial composition, drawing and 



36 \RMSTRONG COLLEGE OF SAA WNAH 

color. Basic work and experimentation will be conducted from -till 
life, natural forms, and li\ing models. Combined with the studio 
work will be discussions and reviews in history and appreciation of art. 

During latter course sessions, efforts will be made to provide 
pecial instruction to students desiring particular information on tech- 
niques and method-. 

Art 115-a-6- Drawing and Painting (3-0-3). Summer. Labora- 
tory fee, $2.00. 

A course in the elements of pictorial composition, drawing and 
color. Basic work and experimentation will be conducted from -till 
life, natural forms, and living models. Combined with the studio 
work will be discussions and reviews in histon and appreciation of art. 

During the latter course sessions, efforts will he made to provide 
pecial instruction to student- desiring particuar information on tech- 
niques and methods. 

Art 116 — Drawing and Painting (5-0 5). Laboratory fee, $2.00. 

\ continuation of Art 115. 

BIOLOGY 

Anatomy and Physiology ln-2n-Sn* 1 2-2-.') i . Fall. Winter and 
Spring. Laboratory fee. $2.50. 

A three-quarter course in human anatomy and physiology. The 
gross anatomy, some histology and physiology of the organ system- are 
presented in order to give the student an understanding of the human 
body as a basis for further studies in clinical nursing. The labora- 
tor\ work includes some dissection of the lower vetebrates and ele- 
mentary experiments in physiology. 

Biology 14-1 \llAr-A) — General Zoology (3-4-5). Fall and Win- 
ter. Laboratory fee. $3.50. 

Biology 14-fi — General Zoology (3-6-6). Fall and Winter. Lab- 
oratory fee. $3.50. 

Introduction to animal structure- and function and a sur\e\ of 
the invertebrate phyla. Laboratory work on representative species of 
each phylum. 

Biology 15-A {115-A) — General Zoology (3-4-5). Winter and 
Spring. Laborator) fee, $3.50. Prerequisite: Biology 14. 

Biology l>/> General Zoology (3-6-6). Winter and Spring. Lab- 
oratory fee, $3.50. Prerequisite: Biology 14. 



col RSE DESCRIPTIONS 



Studs of vetebrate Btructure and function, using selected verte 
brate material l«>i laboratory dissection. Concludes with a stud) ol 1 1 1< ■ 
principles «»t evolution and genetics 

Biology 1(>-I7 ill()M7i Human Biology (5-0-5). Winter and 
Spring. 

This is a two-quarter program designed for terminal students. 
Mam colleges require a non laboratory science for graduation and this 
course is designed to meet this requirement. It l>< ^in> with a surve) 

of the basic biological principals and continues with a study of the 
structure and function of the human body. The second quarter is 
primarily concerned with the principles of evolution and genetics. 

Biology 22 — Invertebrate Zoology (3-6-6), Spring. Laboratory 
tec. $5.00. Prerequisite: Biolog) 14 and 15. 

\ concentrated stud) of the structure and function of invertebrates 
including their economic relation to man. Field trips included for nat- 
ural habitat stud\. 

Biology 23 — Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy (3-6-6). Fall. 
Laboratory fee, $5.00. Prerequisite: Biology 14 and 15. 

A study of the anatomy and evolution of the organ systems of the 
vertebrates. Laboratory work on Squalus, Necturus and the cat. 

Bacteriology ln-2n (2-2-3). Winter and Spring. Laboraton fee, 
$2.50. 

\n introduction to micro-organisms as living organisms and as 
pathogens. The structure, life history and public health importance of 
representative viruses, bacteria, molds, protozoa and helminthes are 
considered. The laboratory work includes the techniques of culturing 
bacteria and the study of the scientific basis of antiseptic and aseptic 
procedures. 



151 SINKSS \|)\I1\ISTU\TI<>\ 

Business Administration 24 (124) — Principles of Accounting. In- 
troductory l 5-0-5 > . 

An introduction to the fundamental principles and procedures of 
accounting, including a study of the journal, the ledger, accounting 
statements, controlling accounts, special journals and the accounting 
system. 

Business Administration 124 a — Principles of Accounting. Intro- 
ductory (3-0-3). Summer only. (B. A. 124-a and B. A. 124-/> are 
identical to Business AVdministration 24 (124). 



38 \RMSTRON G COLLEGE OF SAVANNAH 

\n introduction t<» tin- fundamental principles and procedures 
"I accounting, including a stud) of tin- journal, the Ledger, accounting 
statements, controlling accounts, special journals and the accounting 
Bystem 

Business Idministration V2lb- Principles of Accountings Intro- 
ductory (3-0-3). Summer only. 

Continuation of Business Administration 124-0. 

Business Administration 25 i 1 25 i — Principles of Accounting. In- 
troductory (5-0-5). Winter. Prerequisite: Business Administration 24. 

\n application of accounting principles to certain problems Bucfa 
as the proprietorship, the partnership, the corporation, departmental 
operations, manufacturing accounts and the analysis of accounting 
statements. 

Business Administration 125-a — Principles of Accounting. Intro- 
ductory (3-0-3). Summer only. I Business Administration 125-a and 
Business Administration 125-6 are identical to Business Administration 
25 (125). 

An application of accounting principles to certain problems such 
as the proprietorship, the partnership, the corporation, departmental 
operations, manufacturing accounts and the analysis of accounting 
statements. 

Business Administration 125-/; — Principles of Accounting. Intro- 
ductory (3-0-3). Summer only. 

Continuation of Business Administration 125-a. 

Business Administration 27 (127 I — Business Law (5-0-5). Spring. 

Contracts: offer and acceptance, consideration, performance, rights 
of third parties and discharge. Agenc\ : creation of an agency, liabilities 
of principal and agent. Negotiable instruments: elements of negotia- 
bility, endorsement and transfer, liabilities of parties, discharge. 

Business Administration 2V> i 1 2o i — Business Law (5-0-5). Spring 
Prerequisite: Business Administration 27. 

Partnership: formation, powers, liabilities of partners, termination. 
Corporation: formation, power-, rights of security holders t\pes of 
securities. Sales: vesting of title, warrants, remedies. 

Business Administration 34 (134i — Principles of Accounting. In- 
termediate (5-0-5). Spring. Prerequisite: Business Administration 25. 

Basic accounting theor\ with emphasis on the various forms of 
business organization, assets, liabilities and reserves. 



C01 RSE DESCRIPTIONS 



Business idministration 35 (135) Intermediate iccounting 
(5-0-5). Second course. Prerequisite: Business Administration 34 

I I 34). 

\ continuation of Business \dministration 34 (134) emphasizing 
the theories of valuation «»f fixed assets and liability accounts, tlx- ap- 
plication of these theories and the interpretation <>f Financial state- 
ments prepared on the l»a-i> of these theories. 

Business idministration 36 (136)- Income Tax iccounting 
(5-0-5). Prerequisite: Business Administration 25 (125). 

\ stud) of federal and state income tax laws and the application 
of these laws to the income tax returns <»f individuals, partnerships 
and corporations. 

Business Administration .'-57 (137) — Tax Accounting i 5-0-5 I. Pre 
requisite: Business Administration 36 (136). 

\ continuation of Business Administration 36 (136) with em- 
phasis on corporations and fiduciary returns and social security taxes. 
i:ift taxes and estate taxes. 

Business Administration 115 — Business Correspondence (5-0-5). 
Kail. 

A study of business correspondence, letters, information reports. 
follow-up sales programs, statistical analyis and inter-office communi- 
cation. Stress is placed upon the mastery of fundamentals of clear 
writing. 

Business Administration 129 — Cost Accounting (5-0-5). Spring. 
Prerequisite: Business Administration 125. 

Methods of determining and distributing costs in manufacturing 
and other concerns, stressing the securing of unit costs under both 
the order and the process methods. 

Business Administration 131 — Retail Advertising and Sales Pro- 
motion (5-0-5). 

A course in retail advertising and sales promotion basicalh con- 
cerned with selling in the retail fields — emphasizing the psychology 
of advertising as a branch of sales. The course explores the various 
media and culminates with direct sales approaches. Primarily an 
advertising course, it can be easily tailored to meet the needs of the 
average salesman. 

Business Administration 141 — Advanced Accounting I 5-0-5 I . Pre- 
requisite: Busine>s Administration 34 (134). 35 ( 135 l . 

A study of the problems of partnerships, parent and subsidiary 



10 ARMSTKOV, COLLEGE OK SAVANNAH 



accounting, consignments, installment accounting and other specialized 
accounting problems. 

Business Administration I 12 Advanced Accounting (5-0-5). Pre- 
requisite: Business Administration 141. 

\ continuation of Business Administration 141. 

Business Administration 143 — Auditing Theory (5-0-5). Pre- 
requisite: Business Administration 24 (124). 25 (125). 

Principles governing audits and audit procedure and a study of 
the practical application of accounting knowledge as applied to audit 
procedures. 

Business Administration 145 — C. P. A. Review (5-0-5). 

A review of the interpretation of the federal income tax law as 
applied to individuals, partnerships, estates and trusts: also a review 
of the methods of ascertaining and distributing cost in manufacturing 
concerns emphasizing the securing of costs under the job order, process 
and standard methods. 

Business Administration 151 — Introduction to Transportation 
(5-0-5). Fall. 

History of transportation; developments leading to legislative 
supervision of railroads: developments leading to Federal regulation 
of carriers, other than railroads; freight classifications; principles of 
freight rates and tariffs. 

Business Administration 152 — Elementary Rates and Tariffs. 
(5-0-5). Winter Prerequisite: Business Administration 151 or per- 
mission of the instructor. 

Shipping documents and their application: special freight serv- 
ices; freight claims, overcharge and loss and damage: freight tariff 
circulars; construction and filing of tariffs: terminal facilities and 
switching; and demurrage. 

Business Administration 153 — Intermediate Rates and Tariffs. 
(5-0-5). Spring. Prerequisite: Business Administration 152. or per- 
mission of instructor. 

Reconsignment and diversion: transit privileges: rules governing 
stopping in transit shipments for partial unloading and to complete 
loading: weights, weighing, and payment of freight charges: ware- 
housing and distribution; material handling: and packaging. 

Business Administration 154 — Advanced Rates and Tariffs. 
(5-0-5). Fall. Prerequisite: Business Administration 153, or per- 
mission of the instructor. 



C01 RSE DESCRIPTIONS II 



Through routes and rates; milling in transit; technical tariff and 
rate interpretation; overcharges and undercharges; loss and damage 

claims: import and export traffic: and classification Committee pro- 
cedure. 

Business idministration L55 Interstate Commerce Law, (5-0-5). 
Winter. Prerequisite: Business Administration L54, or permission of 

the instructor. 

Evolution of Interstate Commerce Act: construction of Interstate 
Commerce Act; interpretation and application of Interstate Commerce 
Act: application of penalties under the Interstate Commerce Act; crea- 
tion and organization of Interstate Commerce Commission; practice 
before the Interstate Commerce Commission. 

Business Administration 156 — Interstate Commerce Commission 

and Public Service Commission Procedure. (5-0-51. Spring. Prereq- 
uisite: Business Administration 156. or permission of the instructor. 

Practice before Interstate Commerce Commission: statutory au- 
thority for awarding damages: revision of Commission's decision: 
general review. 

Business Administration 160 — Principles of Management. (5-0-5). 
Prerequisite: Economics 121 and 124. 

Designed to prepare students in the fundamentals of all phases 
of administrative, staff and operative management. Successful man- 
agement principles and techniques are given for all fields of business 
which include: business objectives, policies, functions, executive lead- 
ership, organization structure and morale, cooperative procedure and 
control procedure. 

Business Administration 161 — Principles of Insurance. I 5-0-5 i . 

A comprehensive treatment of the insurance field: an explana- 
tion of the different types of insurance and fundamental underlying 
principles, the organization of the insurance business and accepted in- 
surance practices. 

Business Administration 162 — Real Estate Principles. (5-0-5). 

A consideration of the general principles of property utilization. 
the law dealing with ownership, transfer of title and liens: the ap- 
praisal process, determinants of values, the real estate cycle, manage- 
ment and salesmanship and regulator) legislation. 

Business Administration 164 — Investments. (5-0-5). Prerequisite: 
Economics 127. 



42 ARMSTRONG COLL EGE OF SAVANNAH 

\ stud) of stocks and bonds, market operations, investment 
mathematics, investment policies and financial statements. 

CHEMISTRY 

Chemistry In^-Chemistry for Nurses (4-2-5). FalL Laboratory 
fee, $2. 50. Laboratory breakage, $3.00. H 

Principles <>f inorganic, organic and physiological chemistry with 
some special applications to nursing practice. 

Chemistry 16 (116i — General Inorganic (3-3-4). FalL Laboratory 
Fee, $2.50. Laboratory breakage fee. $3.00* Prerequisite: Two years of 
high school algebra. Mathematics 10 or the equivalent. 

The chemistry of some important metallic and non-metallic ele- 
ments including a systematic treatment of chemical principles and 
their applications. 

Chemistry 17 I 117 I — General Inorganic (3-3-4). Winter. Labora- 
tory fee, $2.50. Laboratory breakage fee. $3.00* Prerequisite: Chemis- 
try 16. 

Continuation of Chemistry 16. 

Chemistry 18 (118) — General Inorganic (3-3-4). Spring. Labora- 
tory fee. $2.50. Laboratory breakage fee, S3. 00.* Prerequisite: Chemis- 
try 17 or its equivalent. 

A continuation of Chemistry 16 and 17. 

Chemistry 16. 17. 18 will not be offered in 1955-56. 

Chemistry 14 — General Inorganic (5-3-6). Winter. Laboratory 
fee, $3.50. Laboratory breakage fee. S3. 00.* Prerequisite: Two years 
of high school algebra or Mathematics 10 or its equivalent. 

The chemistry of some important metallic and non-metallic ele- 
ments including a systematic treatment of chemical principles and their 
applications. Chemistry 14 and 15 are identical to Chemistry 16. 
17 and 18. 

Chemistry 15 — General Inorganic (5-3-6). Spring. Laboratorx 
fee, $3.50. Laboratory breakage fee. $3.00.* Prerequisite: Chemistry 
14 or its equivalent. 

Continuation of Chemistry 14. 

Chemistry 24- Qualitative Inorganic inalysis (3-6-5). Fall. Lab- 
orator\ fee, $5.00. Laboratory breakage fee, $5.00.* Prerequisite: 
Chemistry 15, 18 or its equivalent. 



♦Refundable at the end of each quarter if no item:- have been lost or broken 
and all requirements of the Laboratory have been complied with. 



( 01 IM Dl SCRIPTIONS r. 



\ Btudy oi the fundamental theories of qualitative analysis "I 
common cations and anions l»\ semi micro methods. 

Chemistry 25a Quantitative Inorganic inalysis (2-6 I), Win 
tcr. Laboratory fee, $3.00. Laboratory breakage fee, $5.00.* Pre- 
requisite: Chemistry -1 or approval of the instructor. 

\ stud) of the fundamental theories and application <>f quantita- 
tive analysis involving volumetric and gravimetric methods with the 
emphasis placed on the volumetric methods. No credit is given for 
tin- course before completion of Chemistr) 256. 

Chemistry 256 Quantitative Inorganic Inalysis (1-6-3). Spring. 
Laboratory fee, $3.00. Laboratory breakage fee, $5.00.* Prerequisite: 
Chemistry 2.v/ or it> equivalent. 

The continuation of Chemistry 25a. 

COMMERCE 

Commerce 11a (Ilia I — Beginning Typing i 0-5-2 t . Fall and Win- 
ter. Laboratory fee, $3.50. 

Tins course consists of introductory instruction in the technical 
features and care of the machine, position, fingering, proper technique 
and mastery of the keyboard. An average speed of 30 words a minute 
is attained at the end of the first quarter. 

Commerce lib (1116) — Beginning Typing Continued (0-5-2). 
Winter and Spring. Laboratory fee, S3. 50. 

This course is a continuation of speed development. In addi- 
tion, instruction in typing letters and setting up simple tabulations is 
given. 

\n average of 40 words a minute should be attained at the end 
of the second quarter. 

Commerce lie (111c) — Intermediate Typing. (0-5-2). Spring. 
Laboratory fee. $3.50. Prerequisite: Commerce lla-b or equivalent. 

A typewriter course in which emphasis is placed on speed build- 
ing and accuracy. Special typing problems such as business letter-. 
minutes, notices, stencil cutting and carbon copies are stressed. 

An average of 50 words a minute should be attained at the end 
of the third quarter. 

Commerce 12a-b lll2a-/>l — Beginning Shorthand 1 5-0-5 I. Fall 
and Winter. 



* Refundable at the end of each quarter if no items have been lost or 
damaged, and all requirement? of the laboratory have been complied with. 



44 AKMSTK ONG COLLEGE OF SAVANNAH 

Complete theorj oi Gregg Shorthand In the manual. \<l<liti<»n:tl 
reading and dictation given from Speed Studies. 

Commerce \2e i 1 1 2c ) — Intermediate Shorthand (5-0-5). Spring. 

Dictation and transcription of new and studied material. Student 
is required to take dictation ai the rate of eight) word- a minute. 

Commerce 13a — Burroughs Calculator and Comptometer (0-5-2). 

Fall. Laboratory fee, $3.50. 

The objective of this course is to build speed and accuracy in the 
opt ration of the Burroughs Calculator and Comptometer and a thor- 
ough review of business mathematics. This quarter is devoted to the 
operation of the four fundamentals in arithmetic on the calculator. 

Commerce 136 — Burroughs Calculator and Comptometer (0-5-2). 
Winter. Laboratory fee. $3.50. 

The following business mathematics is reviewed and applied on 
the machine during this quarter: decimal equivalents, split division, in- 
voicing over the fixed decimal, percentages, discounts, and chain dis- 
counts, costs, selling and rate of profit. 

Commerce 13c — Burroughs Calculator and Comptometer (0-5-2). 
Spring. Laboratory fee. S3. 50. 

The third quarter is a continuation of business problems on the 
machine. The transactions covered are reciprocals figuring grain, 
cipher, divisions, prorating cost and expenses, gross and dozen in in- 
voicing inventories. 

Commerce 17 — Office Practice (5-0-5). Spring. 

Typical business office situations are duplicated as nearly as pos- 
sible. Practical problems deal with typing, operation of the mimeo- 
graph, filing and office courtesy. 

Commerce 2\a — Advanced Typing i 0-5-2 i . Fall. Laboratory fee. 
$3.50. Prerequisite: Commerce lie or equivalent. 

Advanced t\ping is a course in the acquisition of -peed and ac- 
curacy including various legal forms and paper-, manuscripts and 

business papers. 

Commerce 21b — A continuation of Commerce 2\a (0-5-2). Win 
ter. Laboratory Fee, $3.50. 

Commerce 21c — A continuation of Commerce 2\l) I 0-5-2 I . Spring. 
Laboratory fee, $3.50. \n average of 60 words is attained. 

Commerce 22a —Advanced Shorthand (5-0-5). Fall. Prerequisites: 
Commerce 12^/. b. c. 



(.1 NER \l l\l ORM \TI<>\ I i 



\ course in which the principles oi Gregg Shorthand an- applied 
in developing -kill and accuracy in writing shorthand and in transcrib 
ing. I lif tn-t half year is devoted t<> dictation of general business 
material: the second half, to dictation material applying to majoi 
\ ocations. 

Commerce 226 / continuation of Commerce --'/ (5-0-5). \\ inter. 

Commerce --< / continuation <>i Commerce 22b (5-0-5). Spring. 
\ speed »>f L20 words a minute is required. 

Commerce 23a idvanced Calculator and Comptometer i 0-5-2'. 

Fall. Laboratory fee, $3.50. 

The next two quarters arc devoted to tin- application <>f the ma- 
chine ami business mathematics to the following businesses: drugs, 
hardware, electrical, plumbing, contracting, wholesale paper. pa\ roll. 
pat king bouse, creameries and dairies, laundries, steel and iron .depart- 
ment stores, hank-, lumber, petroleum, railroads. 

Commerce 237; — A continuation of Commerce 23r/ (0-5-2). \\ inter. 
Laboratory fee $3.50. 

Commerce 23c — Advanced Calculator and Comptometer I 0-5-2 I . 
Spring. Laboratory fee, $3.50. 

Speed, skill and accuracy in the operation of the machine are 
stressed in this last period. 

ECONOMICS 

Economics 21 < 121 I — Principles and Problems of Economics 
(5-0-5). Fall. 

A study of the principles behind the economic institutions of the 
present time and an examination of some of the economic problems 
in the modern world. 

Economics 24 (124l — Principles and Problems oj Economics 
(5-0-5). Winter. Prerequisite: Economics 21. 

\ continuation of the study of economic principles and problems 
begun in Economics 21. 

Economics 125 — Elementary Economic Statistics (5-0-5). 

\n introduction to presentation and analysis of quantitative eco- 
nomic data. Statistical sources, tahle reading, chart making: elementary 
statistical procedures and their economic interpretation: introduction 
to index and time series analysis. 

Economics 126 — American Economic History i 5-0-5 !. 



46 ARMSTRONG COLLEGE OF SAVANNAH 

The growth and development of economic institutions in the 
I nited States from the colonial period to the presenl with major 
emphasis on the period since I860. It will deal with agriculture, in- 
dustry, labor, domestic and foreign commerce, transportation, mone) 

and banking, and finance. 

Economics 127 — Money and Banking (5-0-5). 

The role of mone) in the economic organization: monetary theon ; 
methods of stabilizing the price level; the integration of financial in- 
stitutions: theor\ of hand deposits and elasticity of hank currency: 
discount policy and the interest rate of central hanks: methods of 
regulating credit and business activities. 

Economics 1 2!> — Principles of Marketing (5-0-5). Prerequisite: 
Economics 124. 

Principles and methods involved in the movement of goods and 
services from producers to consumers: marketing functions: marketing 
manufactured goods, raw materials and agricultural products: pro- 
posals for improving the marketing structure. 

Economics J 29 — Labor Economics (5-0-5). 

An analysis of the background and origin of our modern labor 
organizations and their remarkable growth in remit \ ears. 

Special emphasis is placed on the social and economic aspects 
of our labor problems including the study of wages, working condi- 
tions, unemployment problems, the movement toward shorter hours, 
workers welfare plans, labor organizations and the outlook for future 1 
developments along these lines. 

Economics 130 — Personnel Administration (5-0-5). Spring. Pre- 
requisites: Elementary Psychology and Economics. 

A study of the principles and practices in the field of the admin- 
tration of human relations and industry. Emphasis is given to scien- 
tific techniques and devices in the development of a well-rounded per- 
sonnel program. 

Economics L31 — Government and Business I 5-0-5 I . 

\ general survej of the economic aspects of business regulation 
h\ the government, with specific reference to regulator) developments 
and methods in the I nited States: other activities affecting business 
in general, as extension of loans and subsidies, maintenance of fact- 
finding agencies and government owned corporations. 



COl RSE DESCRIPTIONS I. 



I NGINEERING 

Engineering II (111) Engineering Drawing (0-6-3). Fall. 

Topics of Btud) include lettering; the use of the instruments; 
orthographic projection; auxiliary views; sections and conventions. 

Engineering 12 ill2> Engineering Drawing (0-6-3). Winter. 
Prequisite: Engine* ring 1 1. 

topics "f stud) include drawing conventions; dimensions; pic- 
torial representation; threads and fastenings; shop processes; technical 
sketching; working drawings; pencil tracing on paper, reproduction 
process* s. 

Engineering 112a — Engineering Drawing (0-3-1%)- Summer. 

topics <>f stud) include drawing conventions; dimensions; pic- 
torial representation; threads and fastenings; shop processes: technical 
sketching; working drawings; pencil tracing on paper, reproduction 
processes. 

Engineering 112/; — Engineering Drawing (0-3-1%). Summer. 

Continuation of Engineering 112a. 

Engineering 13 (113) — Engineering Drawing (0-6-3). Spring. 
Prerequisite: Engineering 12. 

Topics of study include technical sketching of piping and fittings: 
working drawings: ink tracing on cloth: working drawings from as- 
semblies and assemblies from working drawings. 

Engineering 19 (119) — Applied Descriptive Geometry (0-6-3). 
Spring. Prerequisite: Engineering 12. 

Topics of study include the solution of problems involving points, 
lines, and planes by use of auxiliary views; the solution of problems 
involving points, lines, and planes by revolution methods: simple inter- 
sections: developments of surfaces: an introduction to warped surfaces. 
Practical applications are emphasized. 

Engineering 126 — Plane Surveying (1-3-2). Summer. Prerequisite: 
Mathematics 17. 

The theory of practice in chaining, differential and profile leveling, 
traversing, topographic surveying, reduction and plotting of field notes 
and mapping. 

ENGLISH 

English 11 — Freshman English 1.3-0-3). Fall. 

A sur\e\ of Western Literature, in which books are read com- 
plete, rather than in selections: a review of grammar and practices in 
written English is also undertaken. English 11-12-13 integrates with 



jS ARMSTRONG COLLEGE OF SAVANNAH 

llistor\ 11-12-15 for the entire Freshman year. The discussion method 
i> consistent!) used throughout tin* year. 

English 12 A continuation of English II (3-0-3). Winter. 

English 13 — A continuation of English 12 (3-0-3). Spring. English 
I L-12-13 will not be offered in L955-56. 

English 11- Freshman English (5-0-5). Fall, Winter, and Spring. 

This eourse covers a review of punctuation and the fundamentals 
of grammar, theme writing and vocabulary building. The student also 
reads and discusses selections from the Greek drama and the Odyssey. 

English 15 — A continuation of English 14 ( 5-0-5 1 . Winter and 
Spring. 

Selections from the work of some of the most prominent figures of 
the western world are read and discussed. Theme writing and the stud\ 
of grammar are continued. 

English 14 and 15 will be offered in L955-1956 in place of English 
11-12-13. 

English 20 — dammar and Composition I 5-0-5 I . Fall. 

A general review of grammar, composition and vocabulary. The 
students will have practice in writing themes, making oral reports, and 
in writing business letters. Several books will be assigned for outside 
reading and discussion. 

English 21 (121) — Sophomore English — World Literature (5-0-5). 
Fall and Winter. 

A study is made of some of the works of Shakespeare. Goethe's 
Faust, and selections from the Bible. 

English 22 (122 I — Sophomore English — 11 orld Literature I 5-0-5). 
Winter and Spring. 

Selected modern poetry, drama and novels are read, both American 
and European. 

English 24 — An Introduction to Poetry (5-0-5). Spring. 

\ stud) of the various types and forms of poetr) with special 






emphasis on more recent poetry. 

English 25 — American Literature (5-0-5). Fall. (Not offered in 
1055-56.1 

\ surve) of American Literature and culture. Each student i> 

asked to select one particular period or area or author for concentra- 



C01 RSI DESCRIPTIONS i'» 



(ion. making reports and writing papers in that phase <>f the work. 
The course is primarily conducted l>\ reading and discussion. 

English 27 Modern Drama (5-0-5). Fall. 

(!la>> reading and discussion <>f modern plays from [bsen's 
"Ghosts to Miller's ""Death of a Salesman.' 1 The course is centered 

on appreciation of drama and improving of oral interpretation through 

reading selected plays aloud. 

English 2r> Fundamentals of Speech (5-0-5). Winter. 

Basic principles and practices of speech. The course gi\es some 
attention to the physiological make-up of the speech mechanism, pho- 
netics, gesture, articulation, pronunciation, and regional speech dif- 
ferences. However, it consists primarily of practicing the fundamentals 
of speech through a wide variety of formal, informal, extemporaneous, 
impromptu, and group participation speech exercises. 

English 29 — Play Production ( 2-6-5 I . Spring. 

A study and practical application of the fundamentals involved 
in staging drama: selecting a script, casting, rehearsal, set design, 
and construction, properties, costuming, make-up. box-office, etc. Lab- 
oratory hours are scheduled by agreement between student and in- 
structor but consist primarily of directed work on productions of 
the Armstrong Masquers. 

English lll.v — Freshman English (5-0-5). 

This course covers a review of punctuation and the fundamentals 
of grammar, theme writing and vocabulary building. The student also 
reads and discusses selections from the Greek drama and the Odyssey 

English 112y — A continuation of English lll.v I 5-0-5 I . 

Selections from the work of some of the most prominent figures of 
the western world are read and discussed. Theme writing and the stud\ 
of grammar are continued. 



FRENCH 

French 11-12 (111-112) — Elementary French (5-0-5). Fall and 
Winter. 

A course for beginners. The spoken language is studied as well 
as grammar and reading. 

French 21(121) — Intermediate French (5-0-5). Spring. Pre- 
requisite: Two quarters of college French or two vears of high school 
French. 



50 ARMSTRONG COLLEGE OF SAVANNAH 

Review grammar, oral practice, reading of selected texts. 

French 22 i L22)— Intermediate French, continued (5-0-5). \\ inter. 
Prerequisite: Tine- quarters of College French or three years of high 
school French. 

Further reading of texts, oral and composition practice. 

French 23 — French Literature of the Nineteenth Century (5-0-5). 

Prerequisite: French 22. (Not offered In L955-1956.) 

A survey course. Reading of texts, written and oral reports on 

collateral reading. 

French 24 — French Classical Drama (5-0-5). Spring. Prerequisite: 
French 22. 

Selected plays of Corneille. Moliere and Racine. 

GEOGRAPHY 

Geography 111 — World Human Geography I 5-0-5 I . Fall and Sum- 
mer. 

A survey of world human geography, emphasizing population 
characteristics, topographic features, distribution of economic activities 
and geo-political problems within the major geographical regions. 
Consideration of adequacy of resources to support expanding world 
populations. 

GERMAN 

German 111 — Beginning German I 5-0-5 I . Fall. 

Elements of the grammar, reading of simple texts and speaking. 

German 112 — Elementary German (5-0-5). Winter. 

Grammar, more reading of selected texts and speaking. 

German 121 — Intermediate German (5-0-5). Spring. 

Grammar review. Reading of short stories and German magazines. 
Composition and conversation. 

HEALTH 

Health 111 — Personal and Community Health Problems l 5-0-5 I . 

This course considers the meaning of health and factors influencing 
health behavior: health problems as related to the individual; overview 
of world, national, state and local health problems; community health 



( <>l IM l>! SCRIPTIONS .1 



organizations; mobilizing and evaluating communit) health resources. 
The legal aspects in community health and the law- goveminj 
portable diseases is given special attention. 

HISTORY 

History II /// Historical Introduction to Contemporary Civiliza- 
tion (3-0-3). I' all. 

This course, required ol all students seeking an Associate Degree 
from Armstrong College of Savannah, comprises a chronological Burve) 
of the main currents <>l political, social, religious and philosophical 
activih in Western Civilization from the period of the sixth century 
in Greece to the presenl time. 

History L2 — A continuation of History 11 (3-0-3). Winter. 

History L3 — A continuation of History 12 (3-0-3). Spring. 

! i addition to a chronological treatment of events studied in the 
above course, the dynamics of Western Civilization are studied in the 
works of the following authors: Plato. Lucretius, Dante, Machiavelli. 
Descartes, Locke, Jefferson. Rousseau. Adam Smith. Malthus. Bentham: 
Marx, and others. 

History 11-12-13 will not be offered in 1955-56. 

History 14 — An Historical Introduction to Contemporary Civili- 
zation (5-0-5). Fall. Winter, and Spring. 

This course comprises a chronological survey of the main currents 
of political, social, religious and philosophical activity in Western Civi- 
lization from the period of the sixth century in Greece to the present 
time. 

History 15 — A continuation of History 14 (5-0-5). Winter and 

Spring. 

In addition to a chronological treatment of events studied in the 
above courses, the dynamics of Western Civilization are studied in 
works of the following authors: Plato, Lucretius. Dante. Machiaxelli. 
Descartes, Locke, Jefferson. Rousseau. Adam Smith. Malthus. Bentham. 
Marx and others. 

History 14 and 15 will be offered in L955-1956 in place of History 
11-12-13. 

History 25 I 125 I — Recent European History (5-0-5). Winter. 

This course is designed to provide an opportunity for detailed 
study of major national and international developments in European 
affairs from about 1870 to the present time. Special emphasis is de- 



52 ARMSTRONG COLLEGE OF S \\ VNNAH 

voted to the firs! World War and new developments in Europe follow- 
ing thai wtii and the complex of world events which preceded tin S 

ond \\ <»rld \\ ar. 

History _'<» (126) Recent tmerican History (5-0-5). Kail. 

This course bas as it- purpose the examination »»f the m«»>t im- 
portant events and movements, political, social and cultural, an Ameri- 
can life from aboul L865 to the present time. 

History lll.v — An Historical Introduction to Contemporary Civili- 
zation (5-0-5). 

This course comprises a chronological surve) of the main currents 
of political, social. religious and philosophical activity in Western 
Civilization from the period of the sixth centur) in Greece to the 

present time. 

History 1 1 2 y — A continuation of History 11 1 .v (5-0-5). 

In addition to a chronological treatment of events studied in the 
above courses, the dynamics of Western Civilization are studied in 
works of the following authors: Plato. Lucretius. Dante. Machiavelli. 
Descartes. Locke. Jefferson. Rousseau. Adam Smith. Malthus, Ben- 
tham. Marx, and others. 



HOME ECONOMIC - 

Home Economics 10 — Orientation: Careers and Personal Develop- 
ment (5-0-5). Fall. 

The main opportunities available in the field, such as food spe- 
cialists, nutrition experts, nursery school teachers, marriage counselors 
and others will he discussed. Professional experts in these fields will 
visit the class to show the main vocations dealing with the home. 

Home Economics 10b — Orientation : Personal Development i 3-0-3 i . 
W inter. 

How to he more attractive through personal grooming and what 
is appropriate in manners and dress on various social occasions are 
emphasized. 

Home Economics In — Nutrition and Food Preparation i o-2-4 i . 
\\ inter. Laboratory fee. $4.00. 

\ stud) of the laws governing the food requirements of human 
beings for maintenance of growth, activity, reproduction, and lactation. 
Complete meal> are prepared and served in each laboratory period 

Home Economics 11 I 111 I — Clothing, (2-6-5). Winter. 



C01 RSE DES( RIPTIONS 



Planning and making individual wardrobes. Fashions, design and 
fabrics are studied. Laboratory fee, $2.00. 

Home Economics 12 Foods (3 Ir5). Spring. Laboratory fee, 
17.00. 

Ihi> course is based on the human food needs. Preparation and 
attractive serving of meals is studied. 

Home Economics 21 Home Furnishings I 1-2-5). Winter. Labora- 
tory fee, $2.50. 

I In* interior and exterior planning of the home i> studied. Em- 
phasis is plated on Style of furniture, color and decoration fabrics 
used in the home. 

Home Economics 23 — Elementary Textiles and Clothing for the 
Family (2-6-5). Spring. Laboratory fee, $2.00. 

Practical application of elementary textile study to the selection 
and use of clothing for the family. 

Home Economics 24 — Family Fundamentals (5-0-5). Fall. 

\ course in the famih with the problems that one faces in the 
preparation for children and the adjustment to these children. 

LIBRARY SCIEN< I 

Library Science 11 — Library Usage. 

A one hour course in the use of the Library. Required of all 
students who have not had the equivalent. A practical survey of 
library hooks, resources, tools and services, designed to aid the col- 
lege student in his stud\. research, and recreational reading. Practice 
in the use of the card catalog. Readers Guide and Reference books. 
Preparation of a bibliograpln b\ methods of research. 

MATHEMATICS 

Mathematics L0 (110) — Basic Skills in Mathematics (5-0-5). Kail 
and Spring. 

'Not open to students who have high school credit for two \ears 
of algebra and one of plane geometry. ) 

This course provides an opportunity for the student to acquire 
basic skills in mathematics necessary to meet the common demands of 
various college programs. 

Topics from plane geometr\ include the properties of such geo- 
metric figures are polygons, triangles and circles. 



:>l ARMSTRONG COLLEGE 01 SAA WWII 



ropica from algebra include fractions, signed numbers, Linear 
equations, ratio, proportions, variation, and graphs 

Mathematics L6 (116)- College tlgebra (5-0-5). Fall and Wint. i 
Prerequisite: Two years of lii,-li school algebra and one of plane geome 
tr\ . or Mathematics 10. 

I he course consists () f functions and graphs, logarithms, linear 
and quadratic equations, the binomial theorem, complex number- and 
the elementary theory of equations. 

Mathematics IT (117) — Trigonometry (5-0-5). Winter and Spring. 
Prequisite: Mathematics 16. 

A course coverning the solution of the right and general triangle, 
the general solution of trigonometric equations, trigonometric identi- 
ties, polar coordinates. 

Mathematics L8 (118) Thine Analytic Geometry (5-0-5). Spring. 
Prerequisite: Mathematics 17. 

Analytic geometry of the point and the line, elementary conic a 
lion-, polar coordinates, transcendental curves and transformation <>f 
coordinates. 

Mathematics 19 (119) — Mathematics of Finance (5-0-5). Spring. 
Prerequisite: Mathematics 16. 

This course gives that background necessan for dealing with 
problems found in banking, real estate, financing, and accounting: the 
operation of the compound-interest law in business: simple problems 
concerning bonds, sinking funds, valuation of properties and annuities. 
Practical problems in these fields will be emphasized. The necessan 
aids and short cuts and use of tables and logarithms will be studied. 

Mathematics 21 (121) — Calculus (5-0-5). Fall Prerequisite: Mathe- 
matics 18. 

This course includes the differentiation and integration of pol\ - 
normals, problems in maxima and minima, approximations by differen- 
tials, areas, volumes, centroids. moment of inertia and work. 

Mathematics 22 (122) — Calculus I 5-0-5 I . Winter. 

Prerequisite: Mathematics 21. 

\ continuation of Mathematics 21. This course includes differen- 
tiation of transcendental function- with application to rates, velocity 
and acceleration, curvature and Newton's Method. It also includes for- 
mulas and methods of integration. 

Mathematics 23 (123) — Calculus (5-0-5). Spring. 

Prerequisite: Mathematics 22. 



col RSI Dl m RIPTIONS 



\ continuation "I Mathematics 22. Tin- course includes Simpon's 
rule, indeterminate forms, series, hyperbolic functions, partial drri\a 
tives and multiple integrals. 

Mathematics II 1 The Slide Rule i l-2-2i. Fall, Spring and Sum- 
mer. 

\n intensive stud) and practice in the use of all scale- including 
the solutions of problems using die trigonometric scales. 

Ml SIC 

Music II Elementary and Si^hi Reading (5-0-5). Fall. 

\ course designed to teach the student to read music at sight and 
t<> understand the fundamental principles of music theory. Melodic die 
tation. melod) writing and an introduction to elementary harmonx are 
included. 

Music 12 — Theory and Harmony (5-0-5). Winter. Prerequisite: 

Music 1 1. 

\ continuation of Music 11. with emphasis on harmony, harmonic 
dictation, four-part harmonic writing. 

Music 20 — Music Appreciation (5-0-5). Spring. 

A course designed to help the student understand and enjoy fine 
music. Analysis of form, style and mediums of musical expression 
from the great periods of musical art. Lectures, discussions and re- 
corded sessions comprise the course. 

Music 115-116-117 — Appreciation of Music (2-0-2). Fall. Winter 
and Spring. 

Courses designed for the musical!) untrained who wish an intelli- 
gent understanding of the art of music. Lectures, discussions and 
recorded listening sessions comprise the course. 

PHILOSOPHY 

Philosophy 111-112-113 I 2-0-2 I . Introduction to Philosophy. Kail. 
Winter and Spring. 

\n informal discussion of the thinking of certain Greek. Roman. 
Early Christian. Rennaissance and modern writers. 

Philosophy 114-115-116 1 2-0-2 1 Seminar in Philosophy. Fall, 
Winter and Spring. (Not offered in 1955-56.1 



56 ARMST RONG COLLEGE OF SAVANNAH 

Seminar in philosoph) discussing the ideas as developed in the 
writings of Plato, Vristole, Suetonius, Montaigne Pascal, d<- Tocque- 
ville, Freud Reisman, Lawrence, and others. 

PHYSICAL EDI CATION 

Physical Education 11 — Conditioning Course (0-3-1). Fall. 

Consists of calisthenics, stunts and tumbling, lift- and carries, road 
work, dual combatives, and simple games. 

Physical Education 12 — Team Sports (0-3-1). Winter. 

Consists of basketball, soccer, speedball and volleyball. 

Physical Education 13 — Elementary Swimming (0-3-1). Spring. 

Physical Education 14 — Officiating of Basketball (1-3-2). Winter. 
Prerequisite: P. E. 12 or tbe equivalent. 

Consists of a stud\ of rules interpretation and actual experience 
in coaching and officiating in class and intramural games. Elective 
credit, except when substituted for P. E. 12. 

Physical Education 20 — First Aid and Safety Education (4-0-3). 
Vi inter. Elective Credit. 

The American Red Cross standard course in first aid is followed 
by a broad consideration of the opportunities for safety teaching in 
the school program. 

Physical Education 21 — Elementary Tennis I 0-3-1 I. Fall. 

Physical Education 22 — Elementary Boxing for Men 1 0-3-1 i. 
Winter." 

Physical Education 23 — Senior Life Saving and Instructors' Course 
in Swimming I 2-3-2 I . Spring. 

Physical Education 24 — Boxing for Teachers I 2-3-2 I . Winter. 

Physical Education 25— Folk Rhythms (0-3-1). Fall. 

Physical Education 26 — Modem Dance for Women (0-3-1). 
Winter. 

Physical Education 27 — Tap Dance for Beginners I 0-3-1 I. Winter. 

Physical Education 2o — Adult Recreative Sports I 0-3-1 I. Spring. 

Consists <>f passive, semi-active and active games and sports which 
have carry-over value for later life. 

Physical Education 29 — Folk Rhythms for Teachers I 2-3-2 l . Fall. 



( 01 RSE DESCRIPTIONS 57 

I In- course consists <>l advance training in f < • I Ww dances and pra< 
tice teaching <>t those dances. 

Physical Education 30 Irchery (0-3-1). Spring. 

PHYSICAL SCIENCE 

Physical Science 11 illli (5-0-5). Fall. No prerequisite. 

\ stud) of the scientific method and its use in the attempt <>l man 
to describe and explain the nature of the physical universe. This will 

include the stud) <>f fundamentals of physics and astronomy with some 
example of the applications »>f this knowledge in providing a bettei 
living for man. An attempt is made to go from the study of the large 
universe to the stud\ of the small fundamental particles of which this 
universe is composed. 

Physical Science 12 (112) (5-0-5). Winter. Prerequisite: Physical 
Science 11. 

A continuation of Physical Science 11. In this course emphasis is 
placed on the study of the principles of inorganic and organic chem- 
istry with some example of the application of chemistry in household, 
industry, medicine, biology, geology, etc. Here the knowledge of the 
structure of the fundamental particles of matter (atoms and molecules) 
is used in the study of the classification of the simple components of 
matter ( elements ) and the changes which thev undergo to form more 
complex substances (compounds). 

PHYSICS 

Physics 11 (111) — General Physics (5-2-6). Winter. Laboratory 
fee. $2.50. Prerequisite: a course in college mathematics or consent 
of the instructor. 

Lectures, demonstrations, recitations and laboratory work covering 
the fields of mechanics and heat. 

Physics 12 (112) — General Physics (5-2-6). Spring. Laboratory 
fee. $2.50. Prerequisite: Physics 11 or consent of the instructor. 

Lectures, demonstrations, recitations and laboratory work covering 
the fields of electricity, sound and light. 

Physics 21 ( 121 1— Mechanics (5-3-6). Fall. 

Laboratory fee: $2.50. Prerequisite: Mathematics 18. 

An intensive course in mechanics. The course includes the stud) 
of statics, kinetics, energy, power, friction, machines, elasticity, hy- 
drostatics and mechanics of gases. 



ARMSTRONG COLLEGE OF >\\ WWII 



21 



Physia 22 il22i Electricity (5-3-6). Winter. 

Laboratory fee: $2.50. Prerequisites: Mathematics 21 an 



I In* course includes the stud) of magnetism, electrostatics, current 
electricity and it- effeel and some electrical instruments. 

Physics 23 I \Z\\ Heat. Sound and Light (5-3-6). Spring. 

Laborator) fee: $2.50. Prerequisites: Mathematics 21 and Physics 

22. 

This course includes basic concept- in heat and thermodynamics, 

sound, properties of light and a stud\ of some optical instrument-. 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 

Political Science 12 I 112 I — The Governments of Foreign Powers 
(5-0-5). 

A study is made of the leading modern political theories, and 
attention is paid to the structure and powers of the major foreign gov- 
ernments. (Not offered in day session 1955-1956.) 

Political Science 13 (113) — Government of the United States 
(5-0-5). Fall, Winter and Spring. 

A study is made of the structure, theory, workings of the national 
government in the I nited States and some of the major problems of 
the state and local government. The course shows how developmental 
practice has created our government as it stands today. 

PHYCHOLOGY 

Psychology \n (5-0-5). 

This course is an introduction to the stud) of human behavior with 
emphasis on the underlying principles of mental adjustments. The im- 
portance of the nurses' own personality is stressed. 

Psychology 21 ( 121 I — Introductory Psychology (5-0-5). Pall and 
\\ inter. 

In thi> course human behavioi Is analyzed into its elemental^ 
functions of learning, feeling, thinking, maturation, motives and con- 
flict-. Pacts and principles from scientific research in psychology are 
used for understanding these functions and for measuring individual 
differences in ability, personality and development. Standardized experi- 
ment- and the student's own experiences are used to explore and applv 
the Facts in this field. 



CO] RSE DESCRIPTIONS 

Psychology 22 (122) Social Psychology (5-0-5). Spring. Pre 
requisite: Psychology 21. 

I hi- course provides a stud) «>t the interactions between tli<' indi- 
vidual ami his Bocial groups Basic psychological process of sensory 
perceptual behavior, motivation, learning and thinking are Btudied as 
the} affect an individual's adjustment t<» the social groups and institu 
dons of our culture. Special attention is given t<> a stud) <»f group 
membership, leadership, development of attitudes and values, public 
opinion, propaganda, prejudice and other inter-group tension-. 

Psychology 23 (123) -Child Psychology (5-0-5). Spring. Pre- 
requisite: Psychology 21. 

This course offers a stud) of the developmental factors operating 
in a child"- experience which make for. or interfere with, effective ex- 
pression of his capacities and adjustments to life situations. Sources 
are drawn from experimental research and from findings of analytic 
psychology. Direct observation of children individually and in a nur- 
ser\ is used as a source of class discussion. 

Psychology 25 < J 25 > — Psychology of Adjustment. (5-0-5). Fall. 

The class setting is used in this course for direct experience of the 
use of group discussion for self-understanding. This is supplemented 
h\ -\stematic written self-analysis. 

SOCIAL SCIENCE 

Social Science 104 — Contemporary Georgia (5-0-5). Winter and 
Summer. 

A study of current economic and social statistics as pertaining to 
agriculture, industry and commerce: population trends and govern- 
mental organizations and problems. 

SOCIOLOGY 

Sociology In — Elementary Sociology (5-0-5). Fall. 

This course considers (1) the principles of sociology: l2i tin- 
nurse as a citizen of the community and as a professional worker: (3) 
the importance of the hospital among the social agencies in the com- 
munity; (4i the patient in the hospital coming from the famih and 
returning to the family. 

Sociology 20 (12()i — Introductory Sociology (5-0-5). Winter. 
A study of the principles of social organizations in American cul- 



r>(> ARMSTRONG COLLEGE OF SAVANNAH 

lure based on scientific studio of groups, "races", population and of 
ilir institutionalized functions <>f society. 

Sociology 21 i 121 i Marriage and the Family (5-0-5). Winter 
and Spring. 

This course introduces the famil\ as an institution in various 
cultures as a setting for studying tlie institutional characteristics of tin- 
modern American family. This is followed by analysis of personalih 
development hasic to mature marital love, choice of a mate, marital 
adjustment, parenthood, family administration, and sociological trends 
for f a ii l i 1 \ stability, family disorganization and adjustment of the aging. 

SPANISH 

Spanish 111-112 — Elementary (5-0-5). Fall and Winter. 

These courses are for the purpose of providing the student with 
the elements of Spanish reading, composition and conversation. 

Spanish 121 — Intermediate Spanish (5-0-5). Fall and Spring. 

This course gives the student an opportunity to review the ele- 
ments of Spanish grammar and to delve into the fine points of the 
language. 

Spanish 122 — Advanced Spanish (5-0-5). 

The purpose of this course is to increase the students' facility in 
writing and speaking Spanish. Selected masterpieces of Spanish litera- 
ture and current Spanish newspapers are read. 

UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA EXTENSION COURSES 

In the fall of 1955, the Continuing Education Center at the Uni- 
versity of Georgia found it necessary to raise the fees for extension 
courses to meet the increased cost of instruction. The student will he 
assessed five dollars and sixty cents ( $5.60 ) for each quarter hour of 
extenion work, or twenty-eight dollars ( $28.00 for each five quarter- 
hour course. A registration fee of $1.00 per student per quarter will 
he charged for University of Georgia Extension courses. The classes 
listed below are I niversity of Georgia Extension courses. 

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION AND ECONOMICS 

Business Administration E-311 Introductory Cost Accounting (5-0-5) 

Business Administration E-351 Principles of 

Organization & Management (5-0-5) 

Business Administration E-370 Business Law. first (5-0-5) 

Business Administration E-371 Business Law. second (5-0-5) 

Business Administration E-390 Real Estate Principles (5-0-5) 

Business Administration E-515 Income Tax Accounting (5-0-5) 

Business Administration E-51 ( ; Tax Accounting (5-0-5) 



col RSE DESCRIPTIONS 



6J 



E i tonomics 
Economics 
Economics 
Economics 
Economics 
Economics 
Economics 



( lassical ( lultur 
( Uassical ( lultur 



Elemental j E i onomic Statistic! 



Mi. 11- \ and Banking 
E-333 Vim 1 1- .in I - onomic I listoi j 
E-360 Principles oi Marketing 

I aliui Economics 
E 131 Investments 
E- Ml ( rovernmenl and Business 



CLASSK - 



E-301i 

E-301y 



( -n rk ( lulture 
Latin Culture 



(5-0-5) 



(5-0-5) 



(5-0-5) 
1 5-0-5 > 



KIU <\Tlo\ 



Education 



Iv.UI 



Health Education 
in Public Schools (5-0-5) 



English 
English 



ENGLISH 

E-303 

E-304 

English E-343 

English E-411 

GEOGRAPHY 

Geography E-101 World Human Geography 

HISTORY 



English Literature to 1800 (5-0-5) 
English Literature after 1800 (5-0-5) 

Contemporary Drama (5-0-5) 

Children's Literature (5-0-5) 



History E-350x 

History E-350y 



American History to 1865 
American History since 1865 



(5-0-5) 



(5-0-5) 
(5-0-5) 



MATHEMATICS 

Mathematics E-102 Mathematics of Finance (3-0-3) 

MUSIC 

Music E-302 Methods of Teaching 

Public School Music (5-0-5) 

Music E-312 Public School Music 

For Elementary Grades (5-0-5) 

PHYSICAL SCIENCE 

Physical Science E-l Survey (5-0-5) 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 

Political Science E-l American Government (5-0-5) 

PSYCHOLOGY 

Psychology of Personnel (5-0-5) 

Abnormal Psychology (5-0-5) 

SOCIAL SCIENCE 

Social Science E-4 Contemporary Georgia (5-0-5) 

SOCIOLOGY 

Sociology E-315 The Field of Social Work ('5-0-5) 

Sociology E-360 Contemporary Social Problems (5-0-5) 

SPEECH 

Speech E-8 Fundamentals of Speech (5-0-5) 



Psychology E-414 

Psychology E-423 



INDEX 



Page 



Admission to Class 20 

Admission to College 10-12 

Admission to Special Students 12 

Admission to Transient Students 12 

Admission lo Veterans . . 11-12 

Administration 3 

Advanced Standing 11 

Advertisement and Placement Tests 20 

Aims 9-10 

Art. Course Descriptions 35-36 

Assemblies 22 

Associate in Arts 24 

Athletics 19 

Attendance Regulations 22 

Audio-Visual Instruction 17 

Biology, Course Descriptions 36-37 

Business Administration. Course Descriptions 37-42 

Business Administration. Senior College Preparatory 26 

Business Administration. Terminal 26 

Business Administration, 1-Year Program 33 

Business Administration. 3-Year Program 25 

Calendar 1955-1956 2 

Certificate. Admission by 10-11 

Chemistry. Course Descriptions 42-43 

College Commission 3 

Commencement Exercises 18 

Commerce, Course Descriptions 43-45 

Commerce, Secretarial. Terminal 30 

Conduct 20 

Core Curriculum 24 

Counseling 14 

Course Load 20 

Course Descriptions 35-61 

( iourse Numbers 35 

Curriculums 24-34 

Dean's List 21-22 

Economics, Course Descriptions 45-46 



M)IA ( Continued) 



Pag( 



Engineering, Senior College Preparatorj 

Engineering, Course Descriptions 17 

English, ( lourse I descriptions 17 19 

Evening College L5 

Extension Courses, I niversit) of Georgia 60-61 

Extension Courses Credit at the; 1 niversit) of Georgia 17 

I'aculh 3-7 

Fees L2-13 

French, Course Descriptions 49-50 

Genera] Regulations 20-23 

German, Course Descriptions 50 

Glee Club 19 

Grades 21 

I Graduation, Requirements for 22-23 

Health. Course Descriptions 50 

History of tin 1 College ( ) 

History. Course Descriptions 51-52 

Hodgson Hall 14-15 

Holidays 2 

Home Economics. Course Descriptions 52-53 

Home Economics. Senior College Preparatory 30 

Home Economics. Terminal 31 

Honors 21-22 

Industrial Management 26-27 

Liberal Arts. Senior College Preparatory 31-32 

Liberal Arts. Terminal 32 

Library 14-15 

Masquers 19 

Mathematics. Course Descriptions 53-54 

Medical Technician 27-2M 

Music, Course Descriptions 55 

Night School (see Evening College! 15-16 

Nursing. 1-Year Program 34 

Organization of the College ( ) 

Orientation and Advisement 14 

Philosophy 45-46 

Physical Education 19 

Physical Education. Course Descriptions 56-57 



INDEX (Continued) 

Page, 



Physical Education, Senior College Preparatory 


31 


Physical Examination 


20 


Physical Science 


57 


Husks. Course Descriptions 


57-58 


Placement Sen ice 


18 


Placement Tests 


20 


Political Science. Course Description- 


58 


Pre-Dental 


28 


Pre-Medical 


28-29 


Pre-Optometry 


29 


Pre-Pharmacv 


29-30 


Pre-Veterinar\ . Senior College Preparator\ 


30 


Psychology. Course Descriptions 


58-59 


Publications 


19 


Recommendations 


23 


Refunds 


13-14 


Reports and Grades 


20-21 


Requirements for Graduation 


23 


Scholarships 


17-18 


Science. Senior College Preparatory 


27 


Senior College Courses 


16 


D 

Social Science, Contemporary Georgia 


59 


Sociology. Course Descriptions 


59 


Spanish, Course Descriptions 


60 


Stenographic. 1-Year Program 


34 


Student Activities 


18 


Student Assistants 


17 


Student Center 


18 


Summer School Calendar 


2 


Transfer to Other Institutions 


24 


Transportation. Terminal 


32-33 


University of Georgia. Extension Courses 


16 


Withdrawal from College 


22 



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